Tag Archives: readers

The value of a thorough copy edit

If you pay a visit to Grammerly’s Facebook page today, you’ll notice that their cover image is a tribute to the Grammarly community’s biggest pet peeve: Your constant use of “your” instead of “you’re” makes me wonder whether your keyboard is missing some keys. It seems I am not the only one who gets a little annoyed when someone misuses the language.

Yet, I also know that I am not the only person who can be completely turned off of a book if the grammar is faulty. And even if the occasional subject-verb agreement is fine with you,

Reading has become more social

Remember when you would borrow a book you saw laying around in the house of your friend/aunt/cousin? Reading in those days was simply a matter of seeing something you thought you might like and borrowing or buying it where it stood.

I remember my first Stephen King buy: It. (I think I may have talked about it before). I had never heard of him before that day, and I came across his book by walking into a hotel gift store. This is what the cover looked like for me:

Scary, no? To be honest, I can’t be sure

The printed book lives on … or does it?

And just when we thought that eBooks were going to take over the world, the news of at least two authors who are sticking with the printed book. Richard Russo and Stephen King have both promised that their next novels are not going to be offered electronically. In King’s case, he adds “for the time being” which sort of implies that he hasn’t closed the door on the idea.

Russo says he wants to support the traditional bookstore model and the notion of local buying; so his next novel, a collaboration between himself and his daughter, is going

Musing on the book burning times.

The title of this post belies the truth since the Qur’an burning of 2010 makes the ‘book burning times’ more current than we’d like it to be.

As a bibliophile, I cannot imagine burning a book. The Concise Oxford Dictionary is up to its 12th edition, and I still have my 8th edition sitting on a shelf somewhere because I don’t know what to do with it. I can’t throw it away, I’m not sure what recycling will do to it, and I can’t imagine what use a dictionary that is 4 editions behind the current one will

Transferring eBooks to your eReader – one more time with feeling (and images).

Having just received our “office” Nook, I am still in geek-mode noting the differences between the two devices.

One of the things that struck me when I first connected the Nook to the computer was the directory structure is completely different from the Kindle’s structure.

The Kindle’s folder structure looks like this on my iMac:

Kindle Directory Structure

For me, as a long-time Kindle user, the directory structure is intuitive. The “audible” directory is where audio-books are, the “documents” directory is the main directory for eBooks, the “music” directory is where we can put music to listen to