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‘Manga’-Fying Shakespeare: The Case of the Temptest

‘MANGA’-FYING SHAKESPEARE: THE CASE OF THE TEMPEST
TO BEGIN WITH:
Shakespeare has arguably been one of the most adapted authors across the centuries, around
the world, through varied media forms – be they told (written media); shown (visual media,
whether direct or mediated) or interactive (games or visual novels). Here the adaptation to be
dealt with is the September 2007 edition of The Tempest from the series entitled Manga
Shakespeare, by the London publishing house specializing in graphic novels; named
SelfMadeHero (SMH) and its unique presence as a brand-new addition to the oeuvre of
adaptations of Shakespeare‟s works.
MANGA WHAT? A SHORT OVERVIEW:
According to John A. Lent, manga are comics created in Japan, or by Japanese creators in
the Japanese creators in the Japanese language, conforming to a style developed in Japan in the
late 19th Century (pp 3-4). As Adam Kem has discovered, they have a long and complex
pre-history in earlier Japanese art. A number of artists in the United States have drawn comics
and cartoons influenced by manga, such as Vernon Grant, Frank Miller, Adam Warren, Toren
Smith, Ben Dunn etc. In 2004 TokyoPop introduced original English- language manga (O EL
manga), and the illustrator SMH manga The Tempest is a British artist, who has drawn for this
endeavour.
Heike Jüngst, points out that “Manga have become the largest segment of translated comics
in the Western World (50); which is further attested by Paul Gravett in 2006 that “this is not
some passing craze or flavor of the month.” As Troni Grande states, it is also “a means of
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