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Castle Mine 2

CASTLE MINE 2. 1.A birthday – not mine alas. Copy-write P. Audcent 2015
Well here I am planted into my enormous bed with blankets and eiderdown under my
armpits listening to the noise from below so clearly I don't need to cross over to my
pipes, everything is as clear as a bell, well if you like a full orchestra with drums and
trumpets in the ascendant! So I'm completely left out as usual, me the provider of a
roof to all those dependants, so what has changed. My fault since I did invite the
whole dam lot to come and live here, well yes my two boys are very useful about the
place after all they do is look after the land and the rental of the estate housing. Then
my two useless brothers Gideon came back from OZ bearing two kids and a wife
and a lot of debt from his farm closure. Then brother Eustace, the lemon lad, married
an Italian sort, dark hair and bloodless lips, but a figure to die for, except she bought a
little lad called Fig, short for Figaro I expect. About three years old at a guess, thank
goodness he left the father behind, heard she was not married but the fellow tr ied his
hand at selling his mistress to lemon lad. The grapevine had it that the lemon grove
was a straight swap for the black haired beauty! Then there is Sofia seems to have
brightened up considerably with all these young ones calling her Aunt, so she ho lds
sway over all the youth, well nearly all because my Robroy still holds out, is
politeness personified but avoids any further combat with her.
Speaking of Robroy its his seventh birthday being celebrated downstairs and that
child has quite forgotten his ailing Grandpa and his crop of measles no doubt caught
from that little Italian urchin two weeks ago. Measles at my age, I had them when I
was nine, ages ago, yet I dam well got caught again so nobody is allowed up here.
Well Tom is different he seems to be impervious to any decease and I think I can hear
him plodding up those stone steps which will be the death of us all eventually.
“Your Grace, a piece of Master Nicks birthday cake and a napkin to catch the
crumbs.”
'Thank you Tom and how thoughtful, I presume my wife asked you to come up.'
“Actually it was young Master Nick himself, I suppose he felt a bit sorry for his old
Grand-papa stuck up here all by himself.”
'No doubt Tom, and thank Master Nick, and would you know by any chance what the
Doctor has told my dear wife about my condition.?'
“I heard him in the hall saying you should be now clear of the illness you having
already had the decease before, I believe you were about nine your Grace.”
'Indeed I was and that ruffian, if he had checked my history properly, would not have
me staying up here forlornly, I might add, I should sack him for being a fool!'
“Alas he's the only one we have in the village your Grace.”
I shooed Tom away with my hand and commenced eating a very crumbling cake
with most of it going onto the napkin, and I was just about to climb out of bed and
brush the crumbs out of the window when in dashed Robroy and a bellowing group
of young children all jumping about and frightening the sparrows on my window
ledge.
How on earth did those sparrows know they were getting the crumbs? That’s one of
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