Beeton's Book of Needlework by Isabella Beeton - HTML preview

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In the following scallops always fasten the first point of one scallop to the last point of the preceding scallop. When this row is completed fill up the inner part of each scallop with a network of fine thread, joining the threads at all the places where they cross each other by 2 or 3 stitches with a sewing needle.

[Illustration: 275.--Crochet Border.]

 

* * * * *

 

276.--_Crochet Antimacassar_.

 

Materials: 18 reels of Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 10.

 

[Illustration: 276.--Crochet Antimacassar.]

This pattern can be adapted for a round couvrette or a square one, and is also pretty done in silk for a sofa cushion. Make a chain of 4 stitches, and unite it.

1st round: Work into 1 loop a long stitch, make 1 chain stitch, work another long stitch into the same place, make 1 chain, repeat.

 

2nd round: 3 long stitches into 1 loop, make 2 chain stitches, miss 1 loop, and repeat.

 

3rd round: 1 double crochet into the 2 chain in last round, make 7 chain, and repeat.

 

4th round: Into the 7 chain 2 double crochet, 5 long stitches, and 2 more double crochet, and repeat.

5th round: 1 long stitch into the 1st double crochet in last round, make
9 chain, and repeat. 6th round: Into the 9 chain 2 double crochet, * make 4 chain, work 2 double crochet, repeat from * 3 times more, make 5 chain, work a stitch of single crochet into the 2nd of the 5, make 1 chain stitch, and repeat from the beginning of the round. 7th round: 1 long stitch into the loop formed with the 5 chain, make 12 chain, and repeat. 8th round: Into the 12 chain 2 double crochet into successive loops, make 4 chain, work 1 double crochet into each of the 2 next loops, make 1 chain, work into the 6th loop 1 double crochet, 5 long stitches, and another double crochet, make 1 chain, miss 1 loop, work 2 double crochet into successive loops, make 4 chain, work 1 double crochet into each of the 2 next, make 5 chain, and repeat. This completes the circle. 120 circles sewn together like the engraving will make a good-sized couvrette, 12 in the length, and 10 in the width. If a round couvrette is wished, work 1 circle for the centre larger than the others; this can be done by repeating the 5th and 6th rounds, then sew 8 circles round the centre one, and increase the number of circles in each row till you have made it the size you wish. For the square one, tassels are required for the end and sides; these are made by winding the cotton over a cardboard 4 inches deep about 80 times, then twist 8 threads of the cotton into a cord, cut the cotton wound on the cardboard at one end, make 2 inches of the cord into a loop and tie it firmly with the middle of the tassel, then turn it, tie a thread tightly round, about an inch below the cord, and net over the head; 40 of these tassels will be sufficient.

* * * * *

 

277.--_Crochet Insertion_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 40.

 

[Illustration: 277.--Crochet Insertion.]

The patterns of this insertion are worked in a row, and always two opposite circles at a time. Make a foundation chain of 16 stitches, join them into a circle, then work a 2nd circle consisting again of 16 chain stitches. Work round this circle 24 double stitches, and 24 double round the 1st circle; after the last stitch begin again at the 2nd circle, and work 10 chain scallops as follows:--3 double in the next 3 stitches, * 5 chain, 2 double in the next 2 stitches, repeat 8 times more, 3 double in the last 3 stitches; work in the same manner round the other circle. To get to the next pattern, work 4 slip stitches between the 2 circles in the middle of the just-completed pattern, leaving the cotton under the work and drawing it through the stitch upwards through the loop on the needle; 7 chain stitches, and then 2 circles like those just described, and so on.

* * * * *

 

278 _and_ 279.--_Tobacco Pouch in Crochet Work_.

 

Materials: Black purse silk; crimson ditto; gold thread.

 

The pouch is begun at the bottom, in the centre of the star.

 

With crimson silk make a chain of 3 stitches, and join it into a circle. Work 4 rounds of double crochet, 2 stitches in each stitch.

 

5th round: 2 crimson stitches, 1 gold stitch, and so on.

 

6th round: All gold stitches.

 

7th round: 2 crimson stitches, 2 gold, and so on.

 

8th round: All crimson stitches.

 

9th round: 3 crimson stitches, 2 gold, &c. 10th round: Similar to the preceding.

 

[Illustration: 278.--Star for Tobacco Pouch, No. 279.]

 

11th round: 4 gold stitches, 3 crimson, &c.

 

12th round: 4 gold stitches, 2 black stitches over the 2 centre gold stitches of preceding round, &c.

 

13th round: 3 gold stitches, 4 black stitches, &c.

 

14th round: 1 gold stitch, 6 black stitches, &c.

 

15th round: 3 gold stitches, 4 black stitches, &c.

 

16th round: 4 gold stitches, 2 black stitches, &c.

 

17th round: 4 gold stitches, 2 over the black stitches of preceding round, and 1 on either side, 4 crimson stitches, &c.

 

18th round: 2 gold stitches over the centre ones of preceding round, 7 crimson stitches, &c.

Now work 4 plain crimson rounds, and begin the pattern from No. 279. The centre is crimson, and the pattern is black and gold. The border round the top is of the same colours.

[Illustration: 279.--Tobacco Pouch.]

 

Complete the work by 2 rounds of open treble crochet, and 1 round of gold scallops.

In the open rounds pass a double cord of black silk, finished off with small balls of black silk gimp and gold; and on either side of the pouch fasten one of these same balls with two tassels, one crimson and one black. The pouch is lined with white kid.

* * * * *

 

280 _and_ 281.--_Crochet Rosettes_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 4, 24, or 40.

These rosettes are suitable for trimming cuffs, collars, and bodices, or for making couvrettes, according to the size of the cotton with which they are worked.

[Illustration: 280.--Crochet Rosette.] 280.--Make a foundation chain of 22 chain; join them into a circle and work the 1st round; 44 double.

2nd round: * 7 chain, missing 3 stitches of the preceding round under them, 1 double; repeat 10 times more from *.

3rd round: 1 slip stitch in the first 4 stitches of the next scallop, *
5 chain, miss the last and work back on the other 4, 1 double, 1 treble,
1 long treble, 1 double long treble (throw the cotton 3 times round the needle), 1 slip stitch in the middle stitch of the next scallop; repeat
10 times more from *. Work a wheel in the centre of the rosette, which is ornamented with a circle of chain stitch, as can be seen in illustration; take up one thread of the wheel with every other chain stitch.

* * * * *

 

[Illustration: 281.--Crochet Rosette.]

281.--Begin the rosette with a leaf-like pattern in the centre, and work the 1st row: * 11 chain, miss the last, work back over the following 8 stitches, 1 double, 1 treble, 2 long treble, 1 double long treble, 2 long treble, 1 treble, 1 double in the upper part of the chain stitch before the last, 1 slip stitch in the lower part of the same stitch. The first leaf of the middle pattern is then completed; repeat 6 times more from *. Join the first and last leaves together by working 1 slip stitch in the 1st of the 11 chain stitch. 2nd round: (Fasten on the cotton afresh), 1 slip stitch in the point of each leaf, 12 chain between. 3rd round: 24 double in each scallop. The rosette is then completed.

* * * * *

 

282.--_Crochet Trimming, with Embroidered Flowers worked in Applique, and Velvet Ribbon_.

 

[Illustration: 282.--Crochet Trimming, with Embroidered Flowers worked in Applique and Velvet Ribbon.]

This trimming consists of 2 strips of crochet insertion, ornamented with embroidery patterns worked in applique, and velvet ribbon drawn through. They are worked the long way with fine crochet cotton. Begin on a sufficiently long foundation chain of stitches which can be divided by 20, and work the 1st row: 1 chain, * 5 double, on the first 5 stitches of the foundation, 1 leaf, as follows:--10 chain, without reckoning the loop left on the needle, 1 extra long treble (for which the cotton is wound 5 times round the needle) in the second of the 10 chain, a similar treble in the first, then cast off the 2 treble stitches together, wind the cotton once round the needle, and cast off the last loop with the loop left on the needle. Miss under the leaf 15 stitches of the foundation, and repeat from *.
2nd row: 5 double on the 5 double of the preceding row, inserting the needle in the whole stitches, 15 chain stitches between.

3rd row: * 5 double in the first 5 double of the preceding row, 7 chain,
1 slip stitch in every other stitch of the next scallop of the preceding row, 7 chain between, 7 chain stitches; repeat from *.

4th row: * 1 double in the middle of the 5 double of the preceding row,
3 chain, 1 slip stitch in the middle stitch of each of the 8 scallops, consisting of 7 chain in the preceding row, 3 chain between, 3 chain; repeat from *. These 2 last rows (the third and fourth) are repeated on the other side of the foundation chain.

When the 2 strips of insertion are completed, sew them together so that 2 opposite scallops meet, and ornament them with the embroidery patterns and velvet ribbon.

* * * * *

 

283.--_Crochet Insertion_.

This pretty insertion is very suitable for cerceaunette covers or pillow-cases, and should be worked with middle-sized cotton. If the insertion is used for anything but a pillowcase, omit the lower border on which the button-holes are made. Begin the insertion in the middle of one of the star-like figures, with a foundation chain of 9 stitches; join them into a circle by making 1 slip stitch, and crochet thus:--* 10 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 5th of these chain; this forms 1 purl; 4 chain, 1 slip stitch in the circle, repeat from * 5 times more. Work 4 slip stitches in the next 4 chain, then crochet * in the next purl; 5 double divided by 5 chain, 4 chain, repeat 5 times from *. Fasten the thread after having fastened the last 4 chain-stitches with a slip stitch to the 1st double stitch of this round. This completes the star-like figure. Work on one side of these figures the following rows:--

1st row: * 1 treble in the 2nd scallop of the four placed together, 3 chain, 1 double in the next scallop, 3 chain, 1 treble in the last of the 4 scallops, 3 chain, 1 treble in the 1st scallop of the following 4 placed together, 3 chain, 1 double in the next 2nd scallop, 3 chain, 1 treble in the 3rd scallop, 3 chain. Repeat from *.

2nd row: 3 treble in the 1st stitch of the preceding row, * miss 3 stitches, 3 treble in the 4th following stitch. Repeat from *.

 

3rd row: * 3 treble cast off together as one stitch on the next 3 stitches of the preceding row, 2 chain. Repeat from *.

4th row: 1 double on the next stitch of the preceding row, * 4 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 3 double; this forms 1 purl; 3 double on the next 3 stitches of the preceding row. Repeat from *. After having worked these four rows likewise on the other side of the star figures, work over the last the following 5 rows for the button-holes:--

1st row: 1 double in the next purl, * 2 chain, 1 double in the next purl. Repeat from *.

 

2nd row: 1 double in each stitch of the preceding row.

 

3rd row: Alternately 11 double, 7 chain, under which miss 7 stitches. 4th row: Like the 2nd row.

 

5th row; * 3 double on the next 3 double of the preceding row, 1 purl (4 chain, 1 slip stitch in the last double stitch). Repeat from *.

 

[Illustration: 283.--Crochet Insertion.]

 

* * * * *

 

284.--_Crochet Insertion_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 30.

This insertion is worked in our pattern with fine crochet cotton on a double foundation chain. For the outer edge work a row of purl stitches as follows:--1 double in the 1st stitch, * 1 chain, 1 purl, consisting of 5 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 1st 2 chain, 1 double in the next stitch but 2; repeat from *. The open-work centre consists of 6 rows of scallops; the 1st of these rows is worked on the other side of the foundation chain; 1 double in the middle stitch of every scallop, 5 chain between, then 1 row of slip stitches, and finally a row of purl stitches like the 1st row of the insertion. For the raised flowers, which are fastened over the grounding at unequal distances, * make a foundation chain of 10 stitches, fasten it on over the grounding from illustration by taking the needle out of the loop, inserting it into the 1 chain of the grounding, and drawing the loop through; miss the last of the 10 chain, and work back over the others; 1 slip stitch, 1 double, 1 long double, 3 treble, 1 long double, 1 double, 1 slip stitch, then 1 slip stitch in the 1st stitch, * 9 chain, missing 5 stitches under them, 1 double in the 6th stitch; repeat from *. Each following row consists of 1 double in the middle stitch of every scallop of the preceding row, 9 chain between. Then work the 1st row of the border on the other side of the insertion; 1 double in the 1st stitch of the foundation, inserting the needle into the back part of the stitch; repeat 8 times more from *, and the flower is completed.

[Illustration: 284.--Crochet Insertion.]

 

* * * * * 285.--_Crochet Garter_.

 

Materials: Grey thread of medium size; fine red wool; fine round white elastic cord; a pearl button.

 

This garter is worked in close double crochet, over fine elastic cord; the border and pattern in red wool, the centre in grey thread.

 

[Illustration: 285.--Crochet Garter.]

Begin in the middle by a chain of 98 stitches, with red wool; take the elastic cord, which must always be stretched out a little, and work over it. Work on both sides of the foundation chain; the pattern is completed in the course of the two first rounds; the button-hole is made at the beginning of the first round; make a loop of 21 stitches, and, when you come to it, work over this loop instead of over the foundation chain. Increase the number of stitches at either end of the garter, to round it off. When the second round is completed work two plain grey rounds, then a plain red one. The last round (grey thread) is composed of alternately 1 double, 1 purl formed of 3 chain, 1 slip stitch in the first, missing 1 stitch under the 1 purl. Sew on a pearl button to correspond with the button-hole. The garter would be both more elegant and more elastic if worked entirely in silk.

* * * * *

 

286.--_Crochet Trimming for a Lady's Chemise_.

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton, and a needle to match.

This pattern, as can be seen in illustration, is an imitation of old guipure lace; it is worked all in one piece for the bosom and sleeves, and is part of one of the shoulder-pieces in full size. Both strips of rosettes join at that place, and one is continued for the part round the bosom and the other for the sleeve. In the pattern there are 42 rosettes round the bosom, and 14 round each sleeve. These rosettes are fastened one to another in the course of the work. They are made in the following manner:--Make a chain of 6 stitches, and join it into a ring. 1st round: 8 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 4th chain, which forms a purl (the 3 first chain are reckoned as 1 treble), 1 chain, 1 treble in the ring, * 5 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 1st to form a purl, 1 chain, 1 treble in the ring. Repeat 6 times from *. Instead of the last treble, work a slip stitch to fasten the end of the round to the 3 chain of the beginning, which thus form 1 treble. 2nd round: 9 chain (the 3 first to be reckoned as 1 treble), * 1 treble on the 1st treble of last round, 6 chain. Repeat 6 times from *. 1 slip stitch in the treble at the beginning. 3rd round: On each scallop of preceding round work 2 double, 1 purl, 2 double, 1 purl, 2 double, 1 purl, 2 double. This completes the rosette. Each rosette is fastened to the last by joining the 2 middle purl of both. In the illustration, which is full-size, the purl that are to be joined to those of another rosette are marked by a cross. The joining between the part round the bosom and the sleeve is made in the same manner. The space left between 4 rosettes is filled up with a star formed of chain stitches, marked in our illustration with an asterisk. For this star make a chain of 5 stitches, the 1st of which forms the centre; slip the loop you have on the needle through one of the 8 purl that are free, make 5 chain, 1 double in the centre stitch. Repeat 7 times from *; then tie the two ends tightly, or sew them together 3 of these stars are required for each shoulder.

[Illustration: 286.--Crochet Trimming for a Lady's Chemise.]

For the Border.--It is worked at the same time both round the bosom and sleeves. 1st round: * 1 double in the centre purl of the 1st scallop of the rosette, which we will call the _first rosette_; 5 chain,
1 double in the centre purl of the 2nd scallop of the same rosette, 4 chain; then work the kind of cross which comes between each rosette (see illustration). To make this cross throw the cotton 3 times round the needle, work 1 double treble in the last purl left free of the 1st rosette, keep the last loop on the needle, throw the cotton twice round it, and work a double treble in the 1st purl left free in the 2nd rosette, throw the thread twice round the needle, work 1 treble with the loop left on the needle, make 2 chain, and work 1 treble in the last double treble, which completes the cross; make 4 chain. Repeat from * at each slit on the shoulders; after the last cross make 6 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 2 purl at the end of the slit, 6 chain to come to the next space, where a cross is to be made. 2nd round: Work alternately 1 treble, 2 chain, miss 2; at the slit on the shoulders work 6 double over the 6 chain. The two rounds just explained are also worked round the upper edge, and finished round the sleeves by the following round:--1 double in one of the spaces in last round, * 6 chain, 1 double in the 2nd of the 6 chain, which forms a purl, 1 chain, 1 double on the next but one of the last round, 6 chain, 1 double in the 2nd of the 6 chain, 1 chain, 1 double in the next space. Repeat from *. On the upper edge of the bosom, between the 1st and 2nd rounds of the border, work 1 round of crosses, but throwing the cotton twice only round the needle, so that the treble stitches are not double; make 3 chain between each cross.

* * * * *

 

KNITTING.

287.--KNITTING, though considered to be an old-fashioned art, is by no means so ancient as lacemaking. Knitting has never entirely quitted the hands of English and German ladies; indeed, among all good housewives of any civilised country, it is reckoned an indispensable accomplishment. Knitting schools have been established of late years both in Ireland and Scotland, and Her Majesty the Queen has herself set an example of this industry, as well as largely patronised the industrial knitters of Scotland. Of the rudiments of this useful art many ladies are at present ignorant; it is in the hope of being useful to these that the following instructions are offered.

To knit, two, three, four, or five needles, and either thread, cotton, silk, or wool are required.

Knitting needles are made of steel, of ivory, or of wood; the size to be used depends entirely upon the material employed, whether thread, cotton, silk, single or double wool, for knitting. As the size of the needles depends upon that of the cotton, a knitting gauge is used (see No. 287). The gauge (page 290) is the exact size of Messrs. H. Walker and Co.'s knitting gauge. Our readers will remark that English and foreign gauges differ very essentially; the finest size of German needles, for example, is No. 1, which is the size of the coarsest English wooden or ivory needle. Straight knitting is usually done with two needles only for round knitting for socks, stockings, &c., three, four, and five needles are employed.

[Illustration: 287.--Knitting Gauge.]

 

* * * * *

 

288.--_Casting On_.

This term is used for placing the first row or round of knitting stitches on the needles--"casting them on"--and is done in two ways--by "knitting on" the stitches, or as follows:--

Hold the thread between the first and second finger of the left hand, throw it over the thumb and first finger so as to form a loop, and pass the needle in the loop; throw the thread lightly round the needle, pass it through the loop, and draw up the thread; this forms the first stitch (see No. 288).

[Illustration: 288.--Casting On.]

 

289.--_To Knit On_.

 

[Illustration: 289.--Knitting On.]

Take the needle on which the stitches are cast in the left hand, and another needle in the right hand--observe the position of the hands (No. 289). Hold the left-hand needle between the thumb and third finger, leaving the first finger free to move the points of the needles. (The wonderful sense of touch in the first or index finger is so delicate, that an experienced knitter can work without ever looking at her fingers, by the help of this touch only--in fact, knitting becomes a purely mechanical labour, and as such is most useful.) Insert the point of the right-hand needle in the loop or stitch formed on the left-hand needle, bring the thread once round, turning the point of the needle in front under the stitch, bringing up the thread thrown over, which in its turn becomes a stitch, and is placed on the left-hand needle.

290.--_Simple Knitting (plain)_.

 

[Illustration: 290.--Plain Knitting.]

Pass the right-hand needle into the 1st stitch of the left-hand needle, at the back throw the thread forward, and with the first finger pass the point of the needle under the stitch in forming a fresh stitch with the thread already thrown over, as in "knitting on," only, instead of placing the newly-formed stitch on the left-hand needle, leave it on the right-hand needle, and let the stitch drop off the point of the left-hand needle. Continue thus until all the stitches are taken from the left to the right-hand needle, and the row is then complete.

291.--_To Purl, Pearl, or Seam_.

Seaming or purling a stitch is done by taking up the stitch _in front_ instead of at the back, throwing the thread over and knitting the stitch as in plain knitting; but before beginning to purl, the thread must be brought in front of the needle, and if a plain stitch follows, the thread is passed back after the purl stitch is made (see No. 291). [Illustration: 291.--Purling.]

292.--_To Increase_.

 

Increasing or making a stitch is done by throwing the thread once round the needle and in the next row knitting it as an ordinary stitch.

 

[Illustration: 292.--Increasing.]

 

293.--_To Decrease_.

This is done in two ways: _firstly_, taking up two stitches and knitting them together as one; _secondly_, by taking up a stitch without knitting it, called slipping, then by knitting the following stitch in the usual way, and then slipping the 1st (unknitted) over the 2nd (knitted) (see No. 293). When it is necessary to decrease two stitches at once, proceed thus:--Slip one, knit two stitches together, then slip the unknitted stitch over the two knitted together.

[Illustration: 293.--Decreasing.]

 

294.--_Round Knitting_.

To knit a round four or five needles are used; it is thus that stockings, socks, cuffs, mittens, &c., are made. To knit with four needles, cast on, say, 32 stitches upon one needle, insert a second needle in the last stitch of the first, and cast on 30 stitches; proceed in a similar way with a third needle, but casting on 28 only; when this is done, knit the two extra stitches on the first needle on to the last; this makes 30 stitches upon each needle, and completes the round.

295.--_Casting Off_.

Knit two stitches, and with the left-hand needle slip the first stitch over the second; continue this to the end of the row. _Note_.--The last knitted row, before casting off, should be knitted loosely.

296.--_To Pick up a Stitch_.

 

This is done by taking up the thread between two stitches and forming a stitch with it.

 

* * * * *

 

The following Designs of New Stitches can be used for a variety of work:--

 

297.--_Peacock's Tail Pattern_.

 

Needles, wood or ivory; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton.

 

[Illustration: 297.--Peacock's Tail Pattern.]

Cast on a number of stitches divisible by nine, as it takes nine stitches for each pattern, and two for each border; the border, which is in plain knitting, will not be mentioned after the first row.

1_st Row_.--2 plain for border; 2 plain *, make 1, 1 plain, repeat this four times from *, make 1, 2 plain; repeat from the beginning--then 2 plain for border.

2_nd Row_.--2 purl, 11 plain, 2 purl; repeat. [Illustration: 298.--Spiral Stitch.]

 

3_rd Row_.--Take 2 together, 11 plain, take 2 together; repeat.

 

4_th Row_.--Purl 2 together, purl 9, purl 2 together; repeat.

 

5_th Row_.--Take 2 together, 7 plain, take 2 together.

 

Begin from the 1st row.

 

Thirteen stitches are large enough for a stripe for a sofa-cover. These stripes should be sewn together after all are finished.

 

* * * * *

 

298.--_Spiral Stitch_.

 

Materials: Needles, thick steel or bone; double wool.

This stitch is far more effective worked in thick wool than in cotton. It is done in stripes alternately wide and narrow. For wide stripes cast on twenty-one stitches, for narrow fifteen; this without counting the first and last stitch, the first being slipped, the last always plainly knitted.

1_st Row_.--Purl 3 together to end of row.

 

2_nd Row_.--Make 1, * 1 plain, make 2, repeat from * end by making the last stitch before the plain knitted one at end of row.

 

* * * * *

 

[Illustration 299.--Knotted Stitch.]

 

299.--_Knotted Stitch_.

 

Materials: Needles, wood or ivory; double wool.

 

Cast on 11 stitches.

 

1_st Row_.--All plain, throwing the wool twice round the needle before each stitch.

2_nd Row_.--Each stitch on the needle is now composed of 3 threads of wool: knit the first plain, the second purl, the third plain; cast off the second over the third, and the first over the second; this leaves but one stitch; repeat from first row until a sufficient length is obtained. This pattern makes very pretty borders.
* * * * *

300.--_Knitted Moss Borders_.

 

Materials: Steel needles; moss wool of several shades of green.

Cast on enough stitches for double the width required, say twenty, and knit very tightly in plain knitting, row by row, until a sufficient length has been obtained. Cut off and place the strip on a sieve over a basin of boiling water, and cover it over. When it has absorbed the steam, and while wet, iron it with a box-iron. Then cut the strip down the centre, and unravel the wool on each side. The threads of wool all curling, resemble moss. They are held firmly by the selvedge of the knitting.

* * * * *

 

301.--_German Brioche Stitch_

 

Materials: Wood or ivory needles; wool.

 

Cast on an even number of stitches.

All the rows are knitted as follows:--Slip 1, taken as for purling, make 1, take 2 together. In the following rows the made stitch must always be slipped, the decreased stitch and the slipped stitch of the previous row knitted together.

[Illustration: 301.--German Brioche Stitch.]

 

Ordinary Brioche Stitch is made by casting on an even number of stitches, and working the rows as follows:--

Make 1, slip 1, take 2 together; repeat. _Note_.--The made stitch and the slipped stitch of the previous row must always be knitted together, and the decreased stitch of that row slipped.

* * * * *

 

NETTING.

302.--NETTING is one of the prettiest and one of the easiest accomplishments of a lady. The materials are simple, while the effects produced by good netting are most elegant and of great durability. One great advantage of netting is that each stitch is finished and independent of the next, so that if an accident happens to one stitch it does not, as in crochet or knitting, spoil the whole work.
Netting, so easy to do, is most difficult to describe. The materials required are--a netting-needle and mesh (see illustration No. 302). These are made of bone, of wood, of ivory, and most commonly of steel. The wood, bone, and ivory are only used for netting wool, the steel for silk, cotton, &c.

The needle is filled by passing the end of the thread through the little hole at the left-hand point, and tying it; then the thread is wound on the needle as on a tatting shuttle. The needles are numbered from 12 to 24; these last are extremely fine. The meshes correspond to the sizes of the needles, and are made of the same materials. The larger the size of the stitch required the thicker the mesh must be selected; indeed, large hat meshes are often used for some patterns. A stirrup to slip over the foot to which the foundation is attached is required by those who do not use a netting cushion, placed before them on the table and heavily weighted; to this the foundation is fastened.

The stirrup is made of a loop of ribbon, to which the foundation is tied. Some ladies work a pretty stirrup of the exact shape of a horseman's stirrup; a loop of ribbon is passed through this, and the foundation fixed as before.

[Illustration 302.--Needle and Mesh.]

 

303.--_To Net_.

Place the mesh under the thread, between the thumb and finger of the left hand; it must rest on the middle of the finger and be held only by the thumb (see illustration No. 303). Take the needle in the right hand, pass the thread over the middle and ring finger and over the mesh, pass the needle upwards and behind the mesh in the large loop which forms the thread round the fingers, and at the same time through the first stitch or loop of the foundation. Draw the needle out, retaining the loops on the fingers and dropping them off, the little finger being the last to release the thread. As the thread tightens and the knot is firm, the loop on the little finger should be drawn up quickly and smartly. The next stitches are precisely similar, and row upon row is formed in the same manner. Having learnt the stitch, the next task is to make a foundation. Tie a large loop of strong thread on the stirrup ribbon, and net fifty stitches into this loop, then net four or five rows, and the foundation is ready.

[Illustration: 303.--Netting.]

Simple netting as above explained forms diamonds or lozenges. When a piece of netting is finished it is cut off the foundation, and the little ends of thread that held the stitches are drawn out.

304.--_Square Netting_. Is done precisely in the same manner as plain netting, only begin from one stitch, then net two stitches into this first, and increase by making two in the last loop of every row. As soon as the right number of stitches is complete diminish exactly in the same way by netting two stitches as one at the end of each row until one stitch alone remains. These squares are used for guipure d'art and for darning on.

305.--_Round Netting_

Is nearly similar to plain netting. A little difference exists in the way of passing the needle through the stitch; this is shown in No. 305. After having passed the needle through the stitch it is drawn out and passed from above into the loop just made. This stitch is very effective for purses.

[Illustration: 305.--Round Netting.]

 

306.--_Diamond Netting_

Is often called "pointed netting," and is made by netting from one stitch, increasing one stitch at the end of each row, and decreasing in the same way, as described at page 303.

307.--_To Net Rounds_.

To form a circle, as for a purse, the needle must pass through the first stitch, keeping the last three or four on the mesh and removing this when required by the work.

308.--_"English" Netting_

Is made as follows:--Net a row of plain netting, begin the second row by netting the second stitch, then net the first; repeat, always passing by one stitch and taking it up.

_3rd Row_.--Plain.

 

_4th Row_.--Begin by a plain stitch, then continue as in the 2nd row.

 

_5th Row_.--Plain.

 

[Illustration: 308.--"English" Netting.]

 

309.--_Lace Edging_.

Begin by one stitch and net two in one at the end of each row until as many stitches are required for the narrowest part of the edge. * Increase one then in the two loops until the point of the edge or scallop is reached; at the next row leave the squares which form the point, and begin from *.

310.--_Open Lace_.

 

This kind of edging is made with two meshes of different sizes and extremely fine crochet cotton.

 

Tie the thread to the foundation, net 3 rows with the small mesh of the required length.

 

_4th Row_.--On the large mesh, one stitch in each stitch.

 

_5th Row_.--On the small mesh take 3 stitches together to form 1 loop; repeat to end of row.

 

_6th Row_.--On the large mesh make 5 loops in each stitch; repeat to end of row.

 

[Illustration: 310.--Open Lace.]

 

_7th Row_.--On the small mesh, one loop in each of the 4 first stitches, pass over the 5th, repeat to end.

 

_8th Row_.--On the small mesh make a loop in each of the two first stitches, pass over the 4th; repeat.

 

_9th Row_.--On the small mesh make a loop in each of the two first stitches, pass over the 3rd; repeat.

 

This lace is often used in fine wool of two colours to trim opera-caps, children's hoods, &c.

 

311.--_Shell Border_.

This border is intended as an edging for square netting for couvrettes, d'oyleys, &c. The mesh must be three times as long as that employed for the square netting.

Make 12 stitches in the first stitch of the edge, pass over 8, make 12 in the ninth, and repeat. Then take the mesh used for the square netting, and net one stitch in each stitch, take a still smaller mesh, and complete by adding another row of one stitch in each stitch.

This border forms a very appropriate edging for all articles in square netting, as couvrettes, mats, also for trimming guipure d'art work, and should be netted in the row of holes edging the work; two sets of shells must be worked at the corners when a little fulness is required.
[Illustration: 311.--Shell Border.]

* * * * *

 

KNITTING AND NETTING PATTERNS

 

312.--_Knitted Sock for a Child._

 

Materials for 1 pair: 1 ounce of single Berlin wool; 1 yard of narrow pink or blue ribbon; 2 fine steel pins.

This sock fits well, and is easy to make. It is knitted upon two pins, backwards and forwards. Cast on 22 stitches and knit 22 rows, but increase once at the end of every other row on the right side of the work, so that there are 33 stitches in the 22nd row. Now cast off 28 stitches and knit 12 rows, increasing 1 stitch at the end of every other row. Now 12 more rows, decreasing 1 stitch at the end of every other row; this forms the toe. Cast on 28 stitches on the same needle, and knit 22 rows, decreasing 1 stitch at the end of every other row, and cast off. Pick up the 68 stitches on the upper part of shoe, and knit 20 rows, alternately 2 plain and 2 purl rows, decreasing 1 stitch on each side of the 12 stitches in every other row, which forms the toe and front of sock. Knit 14 rows of 2 plain, 2 purl stitches alternately, then 3 open rows with 1 plain row between. The open rows are worked as follows:--* Purl 2 together, purl 1, make 1, repeat *, 3 plain rows, 1 open row, 1 plain row, and cast off. The sock is sewn together down the back of leg, centre of sole, and the point joined like a gusset to form the toe.

[Illustration: 312.--Knitted Sock.]

 

* * * * *

 

313.--_Knitted Pattern for Counterpanes, Berceaunette Covers, Couvrettes, Antimacassars, &c._

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton; 5 steel knitting-needles of a corresponding size.

 

[Illustration: 313.--Knitted Pattern for Counterpanes, Berceaunette Covers, &c.]

According to the size of the cotton employed, this beautiful square makes different articles, such as counterpanes, couvrettes, &c. &c. If worked with Evans's cotton No. 10, it will be suitable for the first-mentioned purpose. Begin the square in the centre, cast on 8 stitches, 2 on each needle; join them into a circle, and knit plain the 1st round. 2nd round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1; repeat 3 times more from *.

3rd round: Plain knitting. This knitted round is repeated after every pattern round. We shall not mention this again, nor the repetition from *.

4th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

 

6th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

 

8th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

The 9th to 18th rounds are knitted in the same manner, only in every other round the number of stitches between the 2 stitches formed by throwing the cotton forward increases by 2, so that in the 18th round 15 stitches are knitted between.

20th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 5, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

22nd round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, throw the cotton forward, knit 4, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

24th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch; throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

26th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward 3 times alternately, slip 1, knit 1, draw the first over the last, throw the cotton forward; knit 2, slip 1, knit 1, draw the first over the last, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 2, three times alternately, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

28th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, four times alternately, throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch; throw the cotton forward, knit 1, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch; knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 1, four times alternately throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

30th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, six times alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, knit 1 six times alternately, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

32nd round: Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 6 times alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 stitches together, 6 times alternately throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

34th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 7 times alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, knit 1, 7 times alternately knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

36th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 7 times alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, throw the cotton forward, knit 4 stitches together, 7 times alternately throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

38th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 8 times alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the, slipped over the knitted stitch, 8 times alternately knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

40th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 8 times alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 stitches together as 1 stitch, 8 times alternately throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton torward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1. You now have 41 stitches on each needle; knit 1 round, and cast off. When completed, the squares are joined together on the wrong side.

* * * * *

 

314.--_Knitted Sleeping Sock._

 

Materials for one pair: 4 ounces white fleecy, 3 ply; 1 ounces light blue fleecy.

[Illustration: 314.--Knitted Sleeping Sock.] These socks are knitted with white and blue wool in a diamond pattern, and in rounds like a stocking. Begin at the upper part of the sock; cast on 103 stitches with blue wool on pretty thick steel knitting-needles, and knit 20 rounds of the diamond pattern as follows:--

1st round: Quite plain.

 

2nd round: Purled; both these rounds are worked with blue wool.

 

3rd to 6th rounds: Knitted plain with white wool.

7th round: With blue wool; knit 3, draw the wool through the next stitch of the 2nd round worked with blue wool, draw it out as a loop, keep it on the needle, knit again 3 stitches, and so on. 8th round: With blue wool; the loop which has been taken up on the preceding round is purled off together with the preceding stitch. Repeat the 3rd and 8th rounds twice more; the loop of one round must be placed between those of the preceding one. Then knit with white wool 31 rounds, alternately 2 stitches knitted, 2 stitches purled, then work the foot in the diamond pattern in the same way as usual for a stocking. The heel is formed by leaving 23 stitches on each side the seam stitch, and knitted backwards and forwards in the diamond pattern. At the toe decrease so that the decreasings form a seam on both sides of the toe. This is obtained by knitting the 3rd and 4th stitches of the 1st needle together; on the 2nd needle slip the 4th stitch before the last, knit the next stitch and draw the slipped stitch over the knitted one; decrease in the same manner on the other 2 needles of this round. Repeat these decreasings exactly in the same direction and at the same places, so that there are always 4 stitches between the 2 decreasings at the end and at the beginning of 2 needles; they always take place after 3 or 2 plain rounds, and at last after 1 plain round. The remaining stitches are knitted off 2 and 2 together. To complete the sock, the outline of the sole is marked by working slip stitches with blue wool in crochet all round it; work also slip stitches on the selvedge stitch of the heel. The stocking is finished off at the top with a double round of loops in blue wool, worked over a mesh four-fifths of an inch wide.

* * * * *

 

_315 and 316.--Netted Fichu or Cape._

 

Material: Fine wool, or white and blue silk; netting needle and meshes.

This fichu or cape is made either with fine wool or with silk used three or four times double. It may be worn as an evening wrap, either over a cap or on the hair, or as a necktie. The ground in our pattern is white, the border blue. The illustration of the ground and of the border, in full size, will serve as a guide for the size of the meshes to be used. For the ground cast on the first mesh, with white silk, 56 stitches; work 2 rows on the 56 stitches. From the 3rd row, always miss the last stitch, so that each row is decreased 1 stitch. Continue in this manner till the 39th row, when there will be but 19 stitches left. From the 40th row, miss 2 stitches at the end of each row. The ground is completed with the 46th row. The 1st row of the work is the _cross-way side_; the last, the _point at the bottom_; fasten on the blue silk to the 1st stitch of the 1st row, and on a larger mesh work 1 row round the ground of the fichu, not forgetting that the stitch on the outer edge at the sides must always be taken, and 2 stitches made in the 5th, 10th, 14th, [Illustration: 315.--Netted Fichu, or Cape, for Evening Dress.] 18th, 21st, 23rd, and 25th stitches at the sides, as well as in each of the 2 middle stitches of the last row; in each of the other stitches 1 stitch should be made. On the corners of the sides increase _once_, on the cross-way side, seven times in all. This forms the 1st round of the edging or lace.

[Illustration: 316.--Showing the Netting full size for Border of Fichu.]

2nd round of the lace: In each stitch make 2 stitches--still on the larger mesh. 3rd round: Always miss the small flat scallop formed in last row, and work 2 stitches in the stitch which forms a tight loop. Keep thus the same number of stitches, with which work 6 more rounds. For the last round, work 1 stitch in each _tight_ loop.

* * * * *

 

_317.--Lady's Knitted Purse._

Materials: 2 skeins of black purse silk; 2 skeins of scarlet ditto; black jet beads; a steel clasp with chain; a tassel of black beads; 5 steel knitting-needles.

[Illustration: 317.--Lady's Knitted Purse.]

This purse is knitted with black and scarlet purse silk, and ornamented with black beads and a black bead tassel. Begin the purse with the black silk in the centre of the bottom part, and cast on for one part of it 7 stitches. Knit 14 rows on these backwards and forwards, in such a manner that the work is knitted on one side and purled on the other. The 1st stitch of every row is slipped, the 1st row of this part is purled. * On that side where hangs the thread with which you work take the back chain of the 7 selvedge stitches of the part you have just knitted on a separate needle, and knit another part, which must have 15 rows, and the 1st row of which is knitted. Repeat 10 times more from *. The stitches of several parts can be taken on the same needle, so as not to be hindered in working by too many needles. When the 12th part is completed, take the selvedge stitches on the left hand on another needle, cast them off together with the cast on stitches of the 1st part, and fasten the silk thread. Then take the 7 right-hand selvedge stitches of one black part on a needle, take the red silk on which the beads have been strung and work 15 rows on these stitches, the 1st row from the wrong side, and therefore purled; in the 1st, as well as in all the other purled rows, the last stitch must be purled together with the next stitch of the next black part. In the purled rows, moreover, excepting in the first and last one, a bead must be worked in after casting off the 2nd, 4th, and 6th stitches. The stitch must be worked by inserting the needle into the back part, and in drawing through the silk which has been thrown forward, let the bead slide through the stitch so that it is on the right side of the work. In the following knitted row, the needle must also be inserted into the back part of the bead stitch. When 12 such red parts have been completed, work again 12 black parts on the selvedge stitch of the same, in which the beads are not knitted in, but sewn on afterwards, when the purse is completed. Then work 3 times more alternately 12 red and 12 black parts; when the last 12 black parts have been completed cast off the stitches of the last black part together with the selvedge stitches, the 1st on the wrong side; the stitches of the 6th part are cast off in the same manner together with the selvedge stitches of the 7th. The red parts which remain to be worked on the black part are thus lessened by 2; the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th, and the 7th, 8th, and 9th of these parts must be by 6 rows longer. Then gather all the stitches and selvedge stitches of the 10 parts on 2 needles, in such a manner that the 2 black parts, the stitches and selvedge stitches of which have been cast off together, are placed on the sides of the purse, and knit as follows with black silk, first on the stitches of the one needle, and then on those of the other:--1 row knitted, knitting together every 3rd and 4th stitch; then work 3 rows backwards and forwards on the same number of stitches, which must be knitted on the right side; then work 8 rows more in the same manner, casting off the 2 first stitches of the 8 rows. Then cast off all the remaining stitches, sew the beads on the black parts from illustration; also the clasp and bead tassel.

* * * * *

 

318 to 320.--_Knitted Antimacassar or Berceaunelle Cover._

 

Materials: Grey and violot fleecy wool.

 

[Illustration: 318.--Square for Antimacassar.]

This antimacassar, part of which is seen on No. 320, smaller than full size, is made of rosettes and small squares, which are knitted separately with violet and grey fleecy wool with fine knitting-needles. In the middle of each rosette sew on a tatted circle of grey wool. The edge of the antimacassar is ornamented with a grey woollen fringe. For each rosette cast on 6 stitches with violet wool, and knit 12 rows backwards and forwards in such a manner that the work is knitted on one side and purled on the other: the first of these 12 rows is purled, the first stitch of every row is slipped; * then take the first five
selvedge stitches of the knitted part on a separate needle (on the side where the end of wool hangs down, leaving it unnoticed for the present), inserting the needle into the back chain of the stitch (the selvedge stitch which is next to the cast-on stitch remains, therefore, unworked upon), and knit on these a new part, which must have 13 rows; the first row is knitted, and in this row work 2 stitches in the first stitch, one purled and one knitted, so that this new part is equally six stitches wide. Repeat 8 times more from *. After having worked several parts, the stitches can, of course, be taken on the same needle, so as not to increase the number of needles. When the 10th part is com-* *pleted, take the selvedge stitches of the left-hand side of the same on a separate needle, cast them off with the cast-on stitches of the first part, and fasten the wool. Then take the 6 selvedge stitches on the right hand of one part on a separate needle; take the grey wool, and work on these stitches 13 rows backwards and forwards; the first row is knitted; it is worked on the right side of the work; in this, and in every following _knitted_ row, knit the last stitch together with the next stitch of the next violet part. When 10 such grey parts are completed (each of the remaining 9 parts consists of 13 rows, and begins with one knitted row), take all the stitches and the selvedge stitches of these parts on four needles and knit with these stitches, also with grey wool 1 row knitted, in which the 6 selvedge stitches must be decreased to 3 by knitting always 2 stitches together as 1 stitch; each of the other stitches is knitted as usual. Then purl 2 rows with violet wool, and cast off.

[Illustration: 319.--Rosette for Antimacassar.]

 

[Illustration: 320.--Part of Antimacassar.]

For the tatted circle in the centre of the rosette, work with grey wool a circle consisting of 1 double, and 11 times alternately 1 purl 3-10ths of an inch long, 2 double, then 1 purl and 1 double. The circle is sewn on the rosette, from illustration, with grey wool. No. 319 shows such a rosette full size. The small squares (_see_ No. 318) are worked with grey wool; cast on 36 stitches, join the stitches into a circle, and purl 2 rows. To form the corners, knit together 4 times 2 stitches after every 7 stitches in the first of these two rounds, in the second round knit together 2 stitches after every 6 stitches; these decreasings and those of the other rounds must always take place, at the same places as in the preceding round. Then take the violet wool, and knit 7 rows; in the first of these knit 4 times 2 stitches together after intervals of 5 stitches; no decreasings take place in the 2nd, 4th, and 6th rows; in the 3rd row knit together 4 times 3 stitches as 1 stitch, and in the 5th and 7th rows 4 times 2 stitches as 1 stitch. After the 7th round, the remaining stitches are cast off together as 1 stitch. Then fasten the wool and cut it off. Lastly, sew the rosettes and squares together from No. 320 for a cover, and edge it round the border with a fringe of grey wool.
* * * * *

[Illustration: 321.--Knitted Border.]

 

321.--_Knitted Border._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s No. 10 or No. 50 knitting cotton.

If knitted with thick cotton, this border will be suitable for trimming a quilt or berceaunette cover; if, on the contrary, fine cotton is used, the pattern will form a very pretty collar for a little boy or girl.

To make a collar, begin by a chain of 220 stitches, and work 6 rows backwards and forwards alternately, knitting 4 stitches and purling 2.

 

In the 2nd, 4th, and 6th rows the 4 stitches are purled, and the 2 are knitted.

 

7th row: * Purl 2, make 1, knit 2, purl 2. Repeat from *.

8th row: Alternately purl 5, knit 2. All the rows with _even_ numbers are knitted like this, except that the number of the knitted stitches are increased by 2 in each of them. We will not, therefore, henceforth mention these rows.

9th row: * Knit 2, make 1, knit 1, make 1, knit 2, purl 2. Repeat from *.

 

11th row: * Knit 2, make 1, knit 3, make 1, knit 2, purl 2. Repeat from *.

13th row: * Knit 2, make 1, knit 5, make 1, knit 2, purl 2. Repeat from *. The pattern is continued in the same manner. The small gores formed between the ribs are increased by 2 stitches in every second row. Each of these gores has 13 stitches in the 21st row, which is the last. Cast off all the stitches after this row.

Take a crochet needle, and with the same cotton as that used for the knitting work 1 stitch of double crochet in every stitch of the selvedge, then the 2 following rows for the edging. 1st row: Alternately 1 treble, 1 chain, under which miss 1.

2nd row: Alternately 1 double over 1 treble of preceding row, 1 purl (that is, 5 chain and 1 slip stitch in the first), under which miss 1. Over the first row of the knitting work 1 row of close double crochet. The border is now completed.

* * * * * 322.--_Knee-cap in Knitting._

 

Materials: For 1 pair, 4 oz. pink 4-thread fleecy wool, and a small quantity of white ditto.

Begin each knee-cap by casting on with pink wool 114 stitches, equally divided upon 4 needles, and joining them into a circle. Upon this number of stitches work 47 rounds, alternately knitting and purling 2 stitches. In the 48th round begin the gore which covers the knee; it is worked separately backward and forwards, always alternately knitting and purling 2 stitches.

[Illustration: 322.--Knee-cap in Knitting.]

After 2 rows change the pattern, so as to form small squares Knit the first row of this gore upon 26 stitches slipped off from the last row on to a separate needle. At the end of each following row knit the nearest stitch of the nearest needle, so as to increase 1 stitch in each row of the gore.

Continue in this way until only 42 stitches remain of the ribbed part. After this work the remainder of the gore separately, decreasing once at the beginning and end of each row till only 26 stitches remain; then take up 23 stitches of the selvedge on each side of these 26 stitches, and work 47 rounds, alternately knitting and purling 2 stitches.

The edging at the top and bottom of the knee-cap is worked in crochet. With white wool make a chain of 50 stitches; turn and work 1 row of crochet _a tricoter_; then work a second row thus: the first part, as usual, with white, but coming back, with pink make 4 chain between each stitch, work in the same way on the other side of the foundation chain, thus forming a small ruche, and sew it on to the edge of the knitting.

* * * * *

 

323.--_Knitted Neckerchief in Black Shetland Wool._

 

Material: Black Shetland wool.

 

This three-cornered neckerchief is knitted in the following pattern (commencing at the corner).

 

1st row: slip 1, make 1, knit 2 together, inserting the needle into the back part of the stitch, slip 1, make 1, knit 2 together.

2nd row: Knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in the preceding row; the other stitches are purled. In the next row the holes are alternated; the neckerchief must of course be increased at the beginning and end of every other row. It measures at the upper edge 1 yard 16 inches across from one corner to the other; the lower corner is rounded off. The neckerchief is edged with a knitted lace.

[Illustration: 323.--Knitted Neckerchief in Shetland Wool.]

The lace is worked in rows backwards and forwards, the cross way. Cast on 22 stitches and work the 1st row as follows:--Slip 1, knit 11, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 6.

2nd row: Slip 1, purl 18, knit 1 and purl 1 with the stitch formed in the preceding row by throwing the wool forward.

3rd row; Slip 1, knit 2 together, knit 9, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 5.

4th row: Slip 1, purl 5, knit 1, purl 1, knit 1 in the stitch formed in the preceding row by throwing the wool forward, purl 13.

5th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, knit 6, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 4.

6th row: Slip 1, purl 8, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 9.

 

7th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, knit 4, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward 4 times alternately, knit 2 together, knit 4.

 

8th row: Slip 1, purl 3, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in the preceding row, purl 13.

 

9th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, knit 2, 5 times alternately; knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 2.

 

10th row: Slip 1, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 5.

 

11th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, 6 times alternately knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 1.

 

12th row: Slip 1, knit 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 13.

 

13th row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, 5 times alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 2.

14th row: Slip 1, purl 10, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 5.
15th row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 4, knit 2 together, 4 times alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 3.

16th row: Slip 1, purl 3, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 13.

 

17th row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 6, knit 2 together, 3 times alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 4.

 

18th row: Slip 1, purl 8, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 9.

 

19th row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 8, knit 2 together, twice alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 5.

 

20th row: Slip 1, purl 5, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 13.

 

21st row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 10, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 6.

 

22nd row: Slip 1, purl 6, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in preceding row.

 

23rd row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 12, knit 2 together, knit 7.

24th row: Purled. Repeat from the 1st row till the lace is sufficiently long. Then sew on the lace round the edge; the lace can be knitted somewhat narrower for the upper edge. One of the ends of the neckerchief is knotted, As seen in the illustration, and the other end is drawn through the knot.

* * * * *

 

_324 and 325.--Knitted Bodice without Sleeves._

 

Materials: 4 ounces black, 3-1/2 ounces purple fleecy; black silk elastic; a steel buckle; 9 black bone buttons.

This bodice is knitted in brioche stitch with black and purple wool, so that the raised ribs appear black on one side and purple on the other. The bodice fits quite close. It is fastened in front with black bone buttons and a steel buckle. Two strips of silk elastic are knitted in at the bottom. Begin at the bottom of the bodice with black wool, and cast on 170 stitches. The needles must be rather fine, and the knitting not too loose. Work backwards and forwards 24 rows as follows:--Slip the 1st stitch, alternately throw the wool forward, slip 1 as if you were going to purl it, and knit 1. In the next row knit together the stitch which has been slipped and the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward, slip the knitted stitch, after having thrown the wool forward. In the 25th row take the purple wool and work 1 row as before.

[Illustration: 324.--Knitted Bodice without Sleeves (Back).]

 

[Illustration: 325.--Knitted Bodice without Sleeves (Front).]

Now work alternately 1 row with black wool and 1 row with purple, but as the wool is not cut off, the brioche stitch must be alternately knitted and purled. Work always 2 rows on the same side from right to left. The following 26th row is worked with black wool in common brioche stitch, only the slipped stitch of the preceding row is purled together with the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward. 27th row: Turn the work, with purple wool purled brioche stitch. 28th row: On the same side with black wool knitted brioche stitch. After having worked 40 rows all in the same manner, begin the front gore. Divide the stitches upon three needles, 82 stitches on one needle for the back, and 44 stitches for each front part on the two other needles. Then work the first 11 stitches of the left front part (this row must be worked on that side of the work upon which the ribs appear purple) in knitted brioche stitch; the 11th stitch must have a slipped stitch, with the wool thrown forward, therefore it is a purple rib. After this stitch begin the gore with the following 13 stitches. The ribs are then worked so that a purple one comes over a black one, and a black one over a purple one. Do not work upon the following black stitch; knit the following stitch with the one formed by throwing the wool forward. Throw the wool forward, and then only slip the black stitch which had been left, so that it comes behind the stitch which has just been knitted. This crossing of the stitch is repeated once more, then knit the following stitch together with the one formed by throwing the wool forward, throw the wool forward, slip the crossed black stitch and the two following single black stitches. The slipped stitch and the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward before the 3rd single black stitch are then knitted together, so that the crossed stitches are placed in opposite directions. The three black stitches which are knitted off together as 1 stitch in the next row form the middle line of the front gore, and are continued in a straight line to the point of the gore. The crossing takes place twice in this row, but now the black stitch is slipped first. After the 24th stitch knit together the following stitch with the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward. Then continue to work in common brioche stitch to the other front part, where the gore begins before the 24th stitch from the end. In the next row, which is worked in purled brioche stitch with black wool, take up the black loop between two purple ribs after the 11th stitch; purl it so as to form the stitch which is missing at that place. The 3 slipped stitches in the preceding row are purled together as one stitch with the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward between the ribs. The loop is also taken up on the other side of the front gore in the same manner, as well as on the other front part. Then work 6 rows without increasing or decreasing. The crossing of the stitch is repeated after every 7 rows, always on the knitted brioche stitch side, with purple wool. In the 18th row of the gore the 3 middle stitches are not knitted together, but separately, so that the pattern must be decreased in 26 rows. In the back 30 stitches only must be decreased, two in every 6th row. After the 60th row another decreasing takes place on the outer edges of the front parts for the neck; they decrease 2 stitches (1st rib) after the 5th stitch from the front edge in every 3rd row. The 5 stitches which close to the neck are cast off together with the 5 stitches on the shoulders. Then cast off loosely the stitches of the back; take all the selvedge stitches of the front on the needles, and knit 24 rows of brioche stitch with black wool, making 9 button-holes on the right front part. On the wrong side of this part sew on a strip of black silk, with slits worked round in button-hole stitch, stitching at the same time into the knitting. The following scallops are knitted round the top of the jacket and round the armholes with black wool:--Take the selvedge stitches on the needles, work 4 rows alternately, 1 stitch knitted, 1 stitch purled, thread the wool into a Berlin wool-work needle, * cast off 3 stitches together, draw the wool through the needle, and take the 2 following stitches on the wool in the worsted-needle; repeat from *. Sew on the buttons the strips of silk elastic on either side of the black stripe at the bottom, and fasten the ends of the latter with the steel buckle.

_326.--Baby's Boot._

 

Materials for one pair: 1/2 ounce red, 1/2 ounce white, Berlin wool; steel knitting-needles.

This pretty boot consists of a shoe knitted in red wool, and a sock in white wool ornamented with red. Begin the knitting with the upper scalloped edge of the latter. Cast on 96 stitches with red wool, divide them on four needles, and knit in rounds as follows:--1st and 2nd rounds: With red wool, purled.

3rd to 8th round: With white wool.

 

3rd round: Knitted.

 

4th round: * Knit 4, throw the wool forward, knit 1, throw the wool forward, knit 4, knit 3 together. Repeat 7 times more from *.

5th round: Knitted; the stitches formed by throwing the wool forward are knitted as one stitch. Knit 3 stitches together at the place where 3 stitches were knitted together in the 4th round, so that the decreasing of the preceding round forms the middle stitch of the 3 stitches to be decreased in this round.

6th and 7th rounds: Like the 5th.

 

8th round: Knitted; you must have 48 stitches left. 9th to 11th round: With red wool. 9th round: Knitted.

 

10th and 11th rounds: Purled.

 

12th to 30th round: With white wool.

 

12th round: Knitted.

 

13th round to 30th round: Alternately purl 1, knit 1, inserting the needle in the back part of the stitch.

 

31st to 33rd round: With red wool.

 

31st round: Knitted.

 

32nd round and 33rd round: Purled.

 

34th and 35th rounds: With white wool. 34th round: Knitted.

35th round: Alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together. Each stitch formed by throwing the wool forward is knitted as one stitch in the next round.

36th to 38th round: With red wool.

 

36th round: Knitted.

 

37th and 38th rounds: Purled.

39th to 47th round: With white wool. Alternately purl 1, slip 1, as if you were going to purl it; the wool must lie in front of the slipped stitch; in the following rounds take care to purl the slipped stitches.

[Illustration 326.--Baby's Boot.]

Take now 18 stitches for the front gored sock part (leave 30 stitches untouched), and work backwards and forwards with red wool. 48th to 50th row: With red wool.

48th row: Knitted.

 

49th row: Purled.

 

50th row: Knitted.

51st to 85th row: With white wool in the pattern described in the 39th round. But as you work backwards and forwards you must alternately knit and purl the stitches. Decrease 1 stitch at the beginning and at the end of the 84th and 85th rows; decrease 1 stitch in the middle of the 85th row, so that the 85th row has 13 stitches left. After this work with red wool.

86th row: Knitted.

 

87th row: Knit 1, purl 2, knit 1, purl 2, knit 1, purl 2, knit 1, purl 2, knit 1.

Repeat these last 2 rows 3 times more and knit plain to the 94th, decreasing one, however, on each side. Now work with the whole number of stitches, taking up the selvedge stitches of the gored part and dividing them with the 30 other stitches on four needles. Knit once more in rounds; the next 20 rounds are alternately 1 round knitted, 1 round purled. In the 2 last knitted rounds decrease twice close together in the middle of the back part of the shoe. Knit 8 rounds; in every other round decrease twice in the middle of the front of the shoe, leaving 9 stitches between the two decreasings. The number of stitches between the decreasings decreases with every round, so that the decreasings form slanting lines meeting in a point. Cast off after these 8 rounds, by knitting together 2 opposite stitches on the wrong side. The sock part is edged with a raised red border, which is worked by taking all the red stitches of the 1st round of the shoe on the needle and knitting 4 rounds, so as to leave the purled side of the stitch always outside; then cast off very tight. Draw a piece of braid through the open-work row in the sock part, and finish it off at either end with tassels to match.

* * * * *

 

327.--_Knitted Border for a Bedquilt_.

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s No. 8 white knitting cotton; thick steel pins.

 

Cast on a sufficient number of stitches for the length of the border, which must be able to be divided by 31; knit 4 plain rows:

 

5th row: Alternately make 1, knit 2 together.

 

Then 5 more plain rows.

 

[Illustration 327.--Knitted Border for a Bedquilt.]

Now begin the pattern:--1st row: * Make 1, knit 1 _slantways_ (to knit a stitch slantways, insert the needle from the front to the back and from right to left); # purl 5; knit 1 slantways. Repeat from # 4 times more than from * to the end of the row.

2nd row: Purled.
3rd row: Knit 2, * make 1; knit 1 slantways; # purl 5; knit 1 slantways. Repeat from # four times more. Repeat from * to the end of the row.

4th row: The same as the second.

The continuation of the work is clearly shown in our illustration. The increasing caused by knitting the _made_ stitches is regularly repeated in each second row, so that the stitches between the striped divisions increase, and form large triangles; the striped divisions, on the other hand, are narrowed so as to form the point of the triangles. To obtain this result, decrease five times in the 6th, 12th, 18th, and 24th rows, by purling together the two last stitches of one purled division, so that each division has but eleven stitches left in the 25th row. In the 28th row knit together one purled stitch with one knitted slantways, so that there will be only 6 stitches left for each division; these stitches are knitted slantways in the 29th and 30th rows. In the 31st row they are knitted together, two and two. There remain in each division three more stitches, which are knitted together in the 34th row. Two rows entirely purled completethe upper edge of the border.

* * * * *

 

328.--_Knitted Quilt._

 

Materials: 8-thread fleecy wool; wooden needles.

This pattern may be worked in narrow strips of different colours, and in that case each strip should contain 1 row of patterns; or the quilt may be composed of wide strips with several rows of patterns, those of one row being placed between those of the preceding. In the first case, that is if you work narrow strips, you may use several colours; but if wide strips are preferred, they should be of two colours only. Our pattern was worked in wide strips, alternately grey and red. Each strip is knitted the short way.

[Illustration: 318.--Knitted Quilt.]

 

For a strip with five raised patterns in the width cast on 20 stitches.

 

2nd row: Right side of the work. Slip 1, purl 1, * make 1, purl 4. Repeat from * 3 times more; make 1, purl 2.

 

3rd row: Slip 1, knit all the stitches that were purled in the preceding row, and purl all those that were made.

 

4th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 1, make 1, purl 4. Repeat from * 3 times more; knit 1, make 1, purl 2.

5th row: Slip 1, knit all the purled stitches, purl all the rest.
6th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 2, make 1, purl 4. Repeat from * 3 times more; knit 2, make 1, purl 2.

7th row: The same as the 5th.

 

8th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 3, make 1, purl 4, and so on.

 

9th row: The same as the 5th row.

 

10th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over the knitted one, knit 2, purl 4, repeat from *.

 

11th row: Knit all the purled stitches, purl all the rest.

 

12th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over, knit 1, purl 4, and repeat from *.

 

13th row: The same as the 11th.

 

14th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over, purl 4, and repeat.

 

15th row: Slip 1, * knit 2 together, knit 3. Repeat from * 3 times more; knit 2 together, knit 2.

The second row of patterns begins with the 16th row. There are only 4 in this 2nd row, so that after the 1st slipped stitch you purl 3 stitches instead of 1, and in the 2nd row, after the 4th made stitch, you purl 4 more stitches. Repeat alternately these 2 rows of raised patterns, and when you have a sufficient number of strips sew them together. Trim the quilt all round with a knotted fringe.

* * * * *

 

329.--_Stitch in Knitting, for Couvrettes, Comforters, Opera Caps, Carriage Shawls, Jackets, &c._

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 20, or fine wool.

 

Cast on an uneven number of stitches.

 

1st row: Slip 1, *

 

make 1, knit 1, make 1, knit 1. Repeat from *.

2nd row:
Slip 1, * knit 2 together, and repeat from * to the end of the row. [Illustration: 329.--Stitch for Couvrettes, Comforters, &c.]

* * * * * 330 _and_ 331.--_Knitted Veil._

 

Material: Fine Shetland wool.

 

[Illustration: 330.--Knitted Veil.]

Illustration 330 represents a knitted veil in reduced size. The original was worked with fine Shetland wool in an open pattern; it is edged with a knitted lace. Its length is 24 inches, its width 18 inches. Work the veil from a paper pattern of a shape corresponding to that of illustration 330. Compare the paper shape often with the knitting in the course of the work, and try to keep them alike.

Knit the veil in the pattern of the original, or in the pattern of illustration 331. For the former one begin at the lower edge of the veil, cast on 45 stitches upon thick wooden needles, and work the 1st row: * Knit 2, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together twice, repeat from *.

2nd row: Purled.

 

3rd row: Knit 1, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, * throw the wool forward, knit 2 together twice, and repeat from *.

 

4th row: Purled.

5th row: Like the 2nd row. The pattern must be reversed. The pattern figures increase with the increasings at the beginning and at the end of each row.

The pattern of illustration 331 consists of the 2 following rows:--1st row: Slip 1, then alternately throw the wool forward, and knit 2 together.

2nd row: Entirely knitted; make 1 stitch of the wool thrown forward in the last row. When the veil is finished, wet it, and stretch it over paper or pasteboard; let it dry, and then edge it with the following lace:--Cast on 10, knit the 1st.

2nd row: Knit 1, throw the wool forward, knit 9.

 

3rd row: Knitted.

 

4th row: Knit 1, throw the wool forward, knit 2, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together twice, knit 4.

 

5th row: Knitted.

 

6th row: Knit 1, throw the wool forward, knit 2, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together 3 times, knit 3.

 

7th row: Cast off 3 stitches, knit 10. 8th row: Knitted.

 

[Illustration: 331. Pattern of Veil.]

 

[Illustration: 332.--Knitted Pattern with Embroidery.]

 

* * * * *

 

332.--_Knitted Pattern with Raised Embroidery_.

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 8 or 20.

This pattern is worked in rows going backwards and forwards with thick or fine cotton according to the use you wish to make of it. The star-like figures on the knitted squares are worked with soft cotton in _point de poste_. Cast on a number of stitches long enough (19 stitches are necessary for the two squares), work the 1st row: * Knit 11 stitches, alternately 4 times knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward. Repeat from *, The 2nd row is worked like the 1st, only purled, in this row, as well as in the following ones, the stitch must be knitted with the cotton thrown forward _after_ the stitch, the last stitch of a plain square with the first cotton thrown forward of the open-work figure. The number of stitches in the last must always be 8. The pattern consists alternately of these two rows. Each pattern contains 12 rows, with the 13th the squares are reversed. The star figures are embroidered with double cotton by working 5 chain stitch in the middle of each square; draw the needle underneath the knitting to the next centre of a square.

* * * * *

 

333 _and_ 334.--_Knitted Table Cover, (see page 578.)_

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s coarse knitting cotton; thick steel knitting-needles.

 

[Illustration: 333.--Table-Cover Border.]

This cover is suitable for either a large or a small table, as the pattern may be increased as much as required. It is suitable for antimacassars. Cast on 4 stitches, join them into a circle, and work the 1st round four times alternately. Throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

2nd round: Entirely knitted.

3rd round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 1. Repeat 7 times more from *. After every pattern round knit 1 round plain. Until after the 21st round, we shall not mention this any more.
5th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 2 *. From the

7th to the 12th round the knitted stitches in every other round increase by 1 stitch, so that in the 12th round there are 7 stitches between those formed by throwing the cotton forward.

13th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 4, knit 2 together *.

 

15th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, knit 2 together *.

 

17th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 2 together *.

 

19th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, *.

 

21st round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 *.

 

22nd round: * Knit 2, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 3 *.

 

23rd round: * Knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 *.

 

24th round: * Knit 3, knit 2 together, knit 5 *.

 

25th round: * Knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 4.

 

26th round: Entirely knitted *.

 

27th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton forward, knit 1 *.

 

28th round: Entirely knitted.

 

29th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 *.

 

30th round: Entirely knitted.

 

31st round: * Knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 *.

 

32nd round: Entirely knitted.

 

33rd round: * Knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton forward, knit 4 *.

 

34th round: * Knit 4, knit 2 together, knit 5, knit 2 together, knit 5 *.

 

35th round: * Knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 7, throw the cotton forward, knit 5 *.

 

36th round: * Knit 5, knit 2 together, knit 3, knit 2 together, knit 6 *.

 

37th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 5 three times, throw the cotton forward, knit 1 *.

 

38th round: * Knit 7, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 8 *.

39th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 3. throw the cotton forward, knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 *.

40th round: * Knit 9, knit 3 together, knit 10*.

 

41st round: * Knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 15, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 *.

 

42nd round: * Knit 3, knit 2 together, knit 11, knit 2 together, knit 4 *.

 

43rd round: * Knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 13, throw the cotton forward, knit 4 *.

 

44th round: * Knit 4, knit 2 together, knit 9, knit 2 together, knit 5 *.

When the cover is completed, edge it all round, with the following border worked the short way:--Cast on 5 stitches and knit the 1st row, slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2.

2nd row: Slip 1, knit the rest. Repeat this row after every pattern row.

 

3rd row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

 

5th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2.

 

7th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

9th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2.

11th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 1.

13th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2.

15th round: Cast off 8 stitches, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

16th round: Entirely knitted. Begin again at the 1st row, knit a sufficient length of the border, and then trim the cover with it on the outer edge.

[Illustration: 335.--Looped Knitting.]

 

* * * * *

 

335.--_Looped Knitting._

 

Materials: 4-thread fleecy wool; 2 wooden knitting-needles; 1 flat wooden mesh.

 

Cast on a sufficient number of stitches, and knit the 1st row plain.

2_nd Row_.--Slip the 1st stitch; insert the needle into the next stitch, and throw the cotton forward as if you were going to knit the stitch; place the mesh behind the needle in the right hand, and turn the wool which is on this needle upwards, bring it back again on the needle so that it is wound once round the mesh, and twice round the needle. Then only the double stitch through the second stitch, knit it, and insert the needle into the next stitch, and repeat what has been explained. Knit the last stitch without a loop.

3_rd Row_.--Before drawing out the mesh, turn the work and knit one plain row. Every double stitch is knitted as one stitch, so as to attain the same number of stitches as in the 1st row.

4_th Row_.--Like the 2nd row. Repeat these rows as often as required.

 

This knitting is chiefly used for borders of mats. * * * * *

 

[Illustration: 336.--Pattern for Comforters.]

 

336.--_Knitted Pattern for Comforters._

 

Materials: 4-thread fleecy; 2 wooden knitting-needles.

 

Cast on a sufficient number of stitches.

 

1st row: * 3 stitches in the first stitch, knit 1, purl 1, knit 1, knit 3 stitches together, repeat from *.

 

2nd row: Plain knitting.

 

3rd row: Purled.

4th row: Knitted. Repeat these four rows, only in the next row the 3 stitches knitted together are worked on the 3 stitches worked in 1 stitch, and the 3 stitches to be worked in 1 stitch are to be placed on the one formed by knitting 3 stitches together.

* * * * *

 

337.--_Knitted D'Oyley. (See page 579.)_

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 36; glazed embroidery cotton No. 10; steel knitting-needles.

This pattern is knitted with very fine crochet cotton. The middle part as well as the lace border are worked separately; the latter is sewn on to the middle part. The spots in the thick parts are worked in afterwards with coarser cotton. Commence the pattern in the centre, cast on 6 stitches, join them into a circle, and knit 2 plain rounds.

3rd round: Alternately knit 1, throw the cotton forward.

 

4th and 5th rounds: Plain.

 

6th round: Alternately knit 1, throw the cotton forward.

 

7th round: Plain. Every other round is plain. We shall not mention these plain rounds any more.

8th round: Knit 2, * throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 3; repeat from * to the end of the round; lastly, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

10th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.
12th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.

14th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.

16th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 7, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together. The

18th, 20th, 22nd, and 24th rounds are worked like the 16th round; only the middle plain part of the pattern figures increases by 2 stitches in every pattern round, so that there are 15 plain stitches in the 24th round between the 2 stitches formed on either side of the same by throwing the cotton forward.

26th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 6, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together.

28th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 6, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 1.

30th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 6, throw the cotton forward knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward, knit
6, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward.

32nd round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 13, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward.

34th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 11, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton forward.

36th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 9, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward.

38th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 7, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward.

40th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 5, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward.

42nd round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 3, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward.

44th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton forward.

45th and 46th rounds: Plain, then cast off loosely.

For the lace border, which is worked in the short way backwards and forwards, cast on 22 stitches and knit as follows:--1st row: Slip 1, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 4, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.

2nd row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 11.

3rd row: Slip 1, knit 9, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit
2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

4th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 7, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 9.

5th row: Slip 1, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

6th row: Knit 2 together (knit together the stitch and the next stitch formed by throwing the cotton forward), throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 5, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 10.

7th row: Slip 1, knit 10, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 3, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together (stitch formed by throwing the cotton forward and the next stitch).

8th row: Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 12.

9th row: Slip 1, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 5, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.

10th row: Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit
14.

11th row: Slip 1, knit 11, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 together. Then begin again on the 2nd row, and work on till the border is long enough; sew the lace on to the centre, slightly gathering the former. Lastly, work in the spots with glazed or coarse embroidery cotton.

* * * * *

 

_338.--Knitted Braces_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 8 or 12.

These braces are knitted with coarse white cotton, taken double; the braces themselves are worked in brioche stitch, the lappets are knitted plain. Begin at the bottom of the front lappet, make a foundation chain of 14 stitches, knit 5 rows plain backwards and forwards, then divide the stitches into two halves to form the button-hole; knit 15 rows on each of the halves consisting of 7 stitches; then take the 14 stitches again on one needle and work 17 rows on them. Then work a second button-hole like the first one; knit 6 more rows plain, increasing 1 at the end of every row, so that the number of stitches at the end of the lappet is 20.
Then begin the pattern in brioche stitch; it is worked as follows:--Knit first 1 row, then slip the first stitch of the first following pattern row, * throw the cotton forward, slip the next stitch (slip the stitches always as if you were going to purl them), knit 2 together; repeat 5 times more from *; the last stitch is knitted.

2nd row of the pattern: Slip the 1st stitch, * knit 2; the stitch which has been formed in the preceding row by throwing the cotton forward is slipped after the 2nd knitted stitch; repeat 5 times more from *; knit the last stitch.

3rd row: Slip the 1st stitch, * decrease 1 (here, and in all the following rows, knit the next stitch together with the stitch before it, which has been formed in the preceding row by throwing the cotton forward), throw the cotton forward, slip 1; repeat from *; knit the last stitch.

4th row: Slip the 1st stitch, * knit 1, slip the stitch which has been formed in the preceding row by throwing the cotton forward, knit 1, knit the last stitch. Repeat these 4 rows till the braces are long enough. The pattern is 19 inches long. Then knit 6 rows plain, decreasing 1 at the end of every row, then work each lappet separately, dividing the stitches so that each lappet is 7 stitches wide. Each lappet has 72 rows; after the first 18 rows make a button-hole as described for the preceding one. Work 18 rows between the 1st and 2nd button-hole. The lappets are rounded off by decreasing after the 2nd button-hole.

[Illustration: 338.--Knitted Braces.]

 

* * * * *

 

339.--_Pattern for Knitted Curtains, &c._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 8.

This pattern is suitable for knitting different articles, according to the thickness of the cotton used. The number of stitches must be divided by ten. The pattern is knitted backwards and forwards.

[Illustration: 339.--Pattern for Knitted Curtains.]

 

1st row: All plain.

 

2nd row: * Knit 1, make 2, slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over the knitted one, knit 5, knit 2 together, make 2. Repeat from *.

3rd row: Purl the long stitch formed by making 2 in preceding row, * make 2, purl 2 together, purl 3, purl 2 together, make 2, purl 3. Repeat from *. (By _make_ 2 is meant twist the cotton twice round the needle, which forms one long stitch, and is knitted or purled as such in next row.)

4th row: Knit 3, * make 2, slip 1, knit 1, and pass the slipped stitch over, knit 1, knit 2 together, make 2, knit 5. Repeat from *.

 

5th row: Purl 3, * make 2, purl 3 together, make 2, purl 7. Repeat from*.

6th row: Knit 3, * knit 2 together (1 stitch and 1 long stitch), make 2, knit 1, make 2, slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over (the knitted stitch is a _long stitch_), knit 5. Repeat from *.

Continue the pattern by repeating always from the 2nd to the 5th row; the 6th row is the repetition of the 2nd row, but it is begun (compare the two rows) about the middle of the 2nd row, so as to change the places of the thick diamonds in the following pattern. This will be easily understood in the course of the work.

* * * * *

 

_340.--Knitted Insertion._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 20 or 30.

Cast on 14 stitches, and knit in rows, backwards and forwards, as follows:--1st row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, throw cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw cotton forward, knit 3. This row is repeated 18 times more; the stitch formed by throwing the cotton forward is knitted as 1 stitch.

20th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, make 1, knit 1; place next 3 stitches upon another needle behind the cotton, and leave them alone; knit 1, knit 2 together, throw cotton forward, now knit the first 2 of the 3 stitches which have been left; knit the last of the 3 together with the next stitch on the needle, throw cotton forward, knit 3. Repeat these 20 rows till strip is long enough.

[Illustration: 340.--Knitted Insertion.]

 

* * * * *

 

341 _and_ 342.--_Knitted Cover for Sofa Cushion._

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 12; eight ply fleecy wool.

 

[Illustration: 341.--Stitch for Sofa Cover.]

This cushion (15 inches wide, 12 inches high) is made of grey calico; it is covered on one side with knitting, worked with grey crochet cotton. The knitted cover has an open-work pattern, worked backwards and forwards on a number of stitches which can be divided by 2, and which must suit the width of the cushion, in the following manner:--1st row: Alternately throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.

2nd row: Slip 1, knit the other stitches. The stitch formed by throwing the cotton forward is knitted as 1 stitch.

 

3rd row: Knit 1, * throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together. Repeat from *; after the last decreasing knit 1.

 

4th row: Like the 2nd row.

These four rows are repeated till the cover is sufficiently large. Draw a narrow piece of red worsted braid through every other open-work row of the pattern, as can be seen in illustration 341. When the cushion has been covered with the knitting, it is edged all round with a border knitted the long way, in the above-mentioned open-work pattern; it is 14 rows wide, and also trimmed with worsted braid: a fringe of grey cotton and red wool, 3 1/4 inches wide, is sewn on underneath the border at the bottom of the cushion; to this is added a thick red worsted cord, by which the cushion is hung on over the back of an arm-chair. The cushion, on account of its simplicity, is especially suitable for garden chairs.

[Illustration: 342.--Sofa Cushion.]

 

* * * * *

 

343.--Netted Nightcap.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 12.

This cap is netted with crochet cotton over a mesh measuring three-quarters of an inch round; work first a long square for the centre of the crown, cast on 28 stitches, and work backwards and forwards 27 rows with the same number of stitches. Then work 34 rounds round this square, and fasten the cotton. Then count 43 stitches for the front border, and 24 stitches for the back border, and leave them for the edge of the cap. On the remaining stitches on each side work the strings in 95 rows backwards and forwards on the same number of stitches; each string is pointed off at the lower end by decreasing 1 stitch in every row. Sew in a narrow piece of tape in the back border of the cap; the remaining part of the border, as well as the strings, are trimmed with crochet lace or with netted edging, No. 311.

[Illustration: 343.--Netted Nightcap.]

 

* * * * * 344.--_Netted Nightcap_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton, 3-thread, No. 30.

 

[Illustration: 344.--Netted Nightcap.]

This nightcap is very simple and practical. It consists of two similar three-cornered pieces, sewn together so as to form a double triangle; the point of the triangle is turned back, as seen in illustration, and fastened on the lower half of the same. The cap is edged with a lace; a similar lace covers the seam between both parts of the cap. The pattern is worked with crochet cotton over a mesh measuring three-quarters of an inch round. Begin each half in the corner; cast on 2 stitches, and work backwards and forwards, increasing 1 stitch at the end of every row, till the number of stitches is 60. Then sew both halves together, and trim the cap and strings (the latter are worked as on the cap No. 343) with the following lace: work 2 rows of open-work treble stitches--the treble stitches are divided by 1 chain--then work 1 row of double, always working 4 double round the chain stitches which divide 2 treble in the preceding row, or with netted edging No. 311.

* * * * *

 

345.--_Knitted Pattern_.

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 20 for couvrettes, or Berlin wool for sofa quilts.

This pattern can be worked either in wool or cotton, and is suitable for many purposes. Cast on a sufficient number of stitches, divided by 18, for the 1st row: Knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward knit 2 together, knit 4, purl 6, repeat from *.

2nd row: The stitches knitted in the 1st row are purled as well as the stitches formed by throwing the cotton forward; the purled stitches are knitted. This row is repeated alternately, therefore we shall not mention it again.

3rd row: * Knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 6, purl 2.

 

5th row: Purl 4, * knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 4, purl 6.

 

7th row: Knit 2, * purl 2, knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 6.

9th row: Knit 2, * purl 6, knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 4.
11th row: * Knit 6, purl 2, knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.

13th row: Throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, * knit 4, purl 6, knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.

15th row: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 6, purl 2, knit 6. The knitting can now be easily continued from illustration.

[Illustration: 345.--Knitted Pattern.]

 

* * * * *

 

346 _to_ 348.--Knitted Shawl.

 

Materials: Shetland wool, white and scarlet; steel needles.

 

[Illustration: 346.--Pattern for Shawl (348).]

 

[Illustration: 347.--Pattern for Shawl (348).]

This shawl is knitted in the patterns given on Nos. 346 and 347. Both illustrations show the patterns worked in coarse wool, so as to be clearer. Begin the shawl, which is square, on one side, cast on a sufficient number of stitches (on our pattern 290); the needles must not be too fine, as the work should be loose and elastic.

Knit first 2 rows plain, then 3 of the open-work row of pattern No. 346, which is worked in the following manner:--1st row: Slip the first stitch, * knit 2 together, inserting the needle into the back part of the stitch, slip 1, knit 2 together, throw the wool twice forward; repeat from *.

2nd row: Knit 1 and purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward in the preceding row; the other stitches are purled. In the next row the holes are alternated--that is, after the 1st slipped stitch knit 1, throw the wool forward, and then knit twice 2 together.

When 3 such open-work rows are completed, knit 1 row plain, and then work the pattern seen on No. 347, which forms the ground, and is worked in the following way:--1st row: Slip the 1st stitch, alternately throw the wool forward, and decrease by slipping 1 stitch, knitting the next, and drawing the slip stitch over the knitted one.

2nd row, entirely purled.

When 6 such rows have been worked in this pattern, work again 9 rows of the open-work pattern, but work on each side of the 2 stripes, each 6 stitches wide, in the pattern of the ground (No. 347); each first stripe is at a distance of 4 stitches from the edge, and each second stripe at a distance of 20 stitches. After the 9th open-work row, work again 6 rows in the pattern of the ground, then again 8 open-work rows, and then begin the ground, only continue to work on both sides of the shawl the narrow stripes of the ground pattern, the narrow outer and the two wide inner stripes of the border in the open-work pattern. When the ground (pattern No. 347) is square, finish the shawl at the top with two wide and one narrow open-work row, as at the bottom, divided by stripes in the ground pattern. Knot in, all round the shawl, a fringe of scarlet wool; the fringe must be 3-1/2 inches deep.

[Illustration: 348.--Knitted Shawl.]

 

* * * * *

 

TABLE OF SIZES OF MESSRS. WALTER EVANS & Co.'s KNITTING COTTON, 3 THREADS.

|------------------|-----------------------------| | | No. | |------------------|-----------------------------| |Borders | 20, 80 | |Couvrettes | 8 | |D'Oyleys | 80, 100 | |Edgings | 16, 30 | |Insertions | 30, 50 | |Nightcaps | 20 | |Quilts | 4, 8, 12 | |Socks | 20 | |Table Covers | 16 | |------------------------------------------------|

MONOGRAMS AND INITIALS.

 

ALPHABETS.

 

* * * * *

 

349.--_Alphabet_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

 

These letters are embroidered in overcast stitch and in satin stitch, and are the capitals for the alphabet No. 350. Stars ornament this very effective alphabet. [Illustration: 349.--Alphabet (Capitals).]

 

350.--_Alphabet (Small Letters)_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

This alphabet will be found useful for marking linen as well as pocket-handkerchiefs. It is worked in satin stitch, the stars in fine overcast; an eyelet-hole occupies the centre of each star.

[Illustration: 350.--Alphabets (Small Letters)]

 

351.--_Alphabet of Small Capitals_.

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 12 for linen. No. 18 for handkerchiefs.

These letters will be found useful for marking table-linen; they may be worked either in green, red, or white cotton. The letters are worked in raised satin stitch with raised dots and open eyelet-holes.

[Illustration: 351.--Alphabet of Small Capitals.]

 

352.--_Alphabet_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 12.

This pretty alphabet is worked in satin stitch, both raised and veined; the design is composed of forget-me-not blossoms and leaves. Raised dots worked in satin stitch form all the fine lines.

[Illustration: 352.--Alphabet in Satin Stitch.]

 

353.--Alphabet in Coral Stitch.

 

Material: Coloured ingrain marking cotton, or black sewing silk, or filoselle.

The letters of this alphabet are particularly suitable for
pocket-handkerchiefs. The embroidery is worked either with marking cotton, or coloured or black sewing silk; the long white lines are worked in overcast stitch, the small white spots in satin stitch, the remaining parts of the letters in coral stitch, as can be distinctly seen in illustration.
[Illustration: 353.--Alphabet in Coral Stitch.]

354--- Small Alphabet.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This useful alphabet is worked in satin stitch, veined in parts and ornamented with tendrils. As the alphabet of capitals (page 377, No. 351) and that of these small letters correspond, any name may be worked from them.

[Illustration: 354.--- Alphabet of Small Letters.]

 

355.--Alphabet (Capitals).

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 12 and 20.

This alphabet is worked in raised satin stitch, the outlines being partly scalloped; for the fine lines, which should be worked in overcast, embroidery cotton No. 20 should be employed.

[Illustration: 355.--Alphabet in Satin Stitch.]

 

356. Alphabet (Capitals).

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

The alphabet here illustrated is in the florid style; the graceful flowing lines are worked in raised satin stitch, as well as the variously-sized dots which ornament the letters.

[Illustration: 356.--Alphabet (Florid Capitals).]

 

357--Alphabet.

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 12 and 16.

The letters are worked in point d'or, or dotted stitch, with an outline in fine overcast, and large raised spots in satin stitch. The ornamental wreaths round the first five letters can of course be worked round any of the others. It is very fashionable to work one letter only upon handkerchief corners.
[Illustration: 357.--Alphabet in paint d'or.]

358.--_Alphabet in White Embroidery_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16

This alphabet is worked in applique; the ears of corn only are worked in overcast, satin, and knotted stitch. These letters look particularly well on transparent materials. The ears may be omitted by beginners, though they add much to the beauty of the alphabet. To this alphabet are added the ten numerals, which will be found exceedingly useful. By means of the whole alphabet and all these figures, any combination of initials and numbers can be made.

[Illustration: 358.--Alphabets and Numerals in White Embroidery.]

 

359.--_Alphabet (see page_ 402).

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20; very fine black silk.

The vine-leaves and grapes of this graceful and fanciful alphabet are worked in veined and slightly raised satin stitch, the tendrils in point russe; for these the fine black silk is employed.

* * * * *

 

360.--_Sampler (Frontispiece_).

 

Materials: cambric muslin or fine linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 16, 18, and 20; red cotton and black silk.

This illustration shows a sampler which will be found useful for learning to embroider letters for marking linen. The material used is cambric muslin or fine linen. Work the embroidery with white embroidery cotton, red cotton, or black silk. The thick parts of the letters are worked in slanting satin stitch and back stitch; the outlines of the stitched parts are worked in overcast, as well as the fine outlines of the letters and all the fine outlines of the patterns. The monograms and crowns are worked in a similar manner. Work button-hole stitch round the outside of the sampler. The letters and crowns may, of course, be employed for other purposes.

* * * * *

 

361.--_Alphabet (Capitals)_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20 This effective alphabet is very easily worked, the stitches employed being raised and veined satin stitch, and overcast. The raised dots are worked in satin stitch, care being taken to preserve their position in the _centre_ of each open space.

[Illustration: 361.--Alphabet (Capitals).]

 

* * * * *

 

MONOGRAMS AND INITIALS.

 

* * * * *

 

[Illustration: 362.--Alice.]

 

362.--_Alice_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

The letters of this name, except the initial letter, are very simple, being worked in plain satin stitch, while the initial letter is worked in raised satin stitch, point de poste, and overcast.

363.--_Amalie_.

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 16 and 20.

 

[Illustration: 363.--Amalie.]

The highly-ornate initial of this name is not difficult to work, requiring only great regularity and evenness in embroidering the tendrils and eyelet-holes. The veinings of the letter must be carefully defined. The remainder of the name is executed in plain satin stitch, a few eyelet-holes being introduced.

"Amalie" can easily be altered into "Amelia" by changing the place of the _a_ and _e_. In the centre of each letter a large eyelet-hole is placed; smaller eyelet-holes of graduated sizes occupy parts of the overcast scrolls, which should be worked with No. 20 cotton. The initial letter is worked in raised satin stitch.

[Illustration: 364.--Amy.]

 

364.--_Amy_. Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This pretty name is worked in delicately raised satin stitch and point de pois; the dots in dotted satin stitch, and the elegant little design beneath is worked in point russe.

365.--_Annie_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

 

[Illustration: 365.--Annie.]

The letter _A_ of this name is rather elaborate, and is worked in point de pois or back stitching, the outlines in fine overcast, the letters in satin stitch. The ornaments surrounding the word "Annie" are worked in overcast.

366.--_A.M.K._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

 

This name is worked in satin stitch, with small dots of raised satin stitch. The eyelet-holes in the middle letter to be worked in overcast.

 

[Illustration: 366.--A.M.K.]

 

367.--_B.R._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

 

[Illustration: 367.--B.R.]

 

These initials are worked in applique in the centre of a medallion in satin stitch, overcast, and lace stitches.

 

368.--_Carrie_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

 

[Illustration: 368.--Carrie.]

This name is very easy to work, being very clearly and simply embroidered in overcast and satin stitch. The thick dots may be worked without the eyelet-holes if preferred.

[Illustration: 359.--Caroline.] 369.--_Caroline_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This pretty name requires care in working; the leaves which adorn the letters must be very well defined; they, as well as the letters, are embroidered in satin stitch, the initial letter being veined, and the ornaments worked in overcast and eyelet-holes.

370.--_Charlotte_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

 

[Illustration: 370.--Charlotte.]

This name is worked in satin stitch and overcast, the small and elegant dots in point de russe and graduated satin stitch; the large ones are worked in raised satin stitch.

371.--_Cornelie_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

 

This word is worked in plain satin stitch, the ornamentation in overcast stitch.

 

[Illustration: 371.--Cornelie.]

 

372.--_C.M._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

 

This design is simple, is worked in graduated satin stitch, and is most elegant.

 

[Illustration: 372--C.M.]

 

[Illustration: 373.--Dora.]

 

373.--_Dora_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 30.

This elaborate design should not be attempted by beginners in the art of embroidery; it is worked in overcast stitch, raised and veined satin stitch; the tendrils are entirely worked in graduated overcast; the name is placed over a graceful spray of wild flowers worked in the above-named stitches. This pattern, although originally designed to be worked on net or fine muslin, is far more effective when worked on cambric or fine lawn.

374.--_D.C._

 

[Illustration: 374.--D.C.]

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

These letters are worked in satin stitch and veined satin stitch; the forget-me-nots are worked in raised satin stitch with a small eyelet-hole in the middle worked in overcast stitch.

375.--_Emily_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16. This name is worked in satin stitch, the dots in the middle in point de poste, the rest of the letters in satin stitch and in dotted satin stitch.

[Illustration: 375.--Emily.]

 

376.--_Ernestine_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This elegant design is most effective; the first letter very elaborate; the rest of the letters simply worked in satin stitch. The small stars are worked in overcast stitch, and the initial letter itself in veined satin stitch.

[Illustration: 376.--Ernestine.]

 

377.--_Etta_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 10.

The letters which compose this name are formed entirely of leaves, flowers, and tendrils, worked entirely in satin stitch and overcast; the tendrils which surround the name are worked in overcast, and have a few eyelet-holes placed among them.
[Illustration: 377.--Etta.]

378.--_Eva_.

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 16 and 20.

 

This name is worked in satin stitch, the leaf in point de sable; the veinings are worked in raised satin stitch.

 

[Illustration: 378.--Eva.]

 

379.--_E.A._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s White and Red Embroidery Cotton No. 30.

This very pretty monogram is worked quite in a new style of embroidery. The design represents the emblems of Faith, Hope, and Charity. The outlines of the shield and cross are worked in overcast, the initials "E.A.," the torch, and the anchor in satin stitch with white cotton, the leaves partly in satin stitch with white and partly in point d'or with red cotton, with only a fine outline in overcast. The cross and the flames of the torch are embroidered in the same manner.

[Illustration: 379--E.A.]

 

380.--_E.A.P._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

 

These pretty initials are worked in satin stitch, the middle letter in point russe and point de poste.

 

[Illustration: 380.--E.A.P.]

 

381.--_E.P._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

 

These elegant letters are worked in veined and raised satin stitch.

 

[Illustration: 381.--E.P.] [Illustration: 382.--E.R.]

 

382.--_E.R._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 30.

The ovals are worked in overcast and point de pois, the letters in satin stitch, the ornamentation in satin stitch and overcast.

[Illustration: 383.--E.A.]

 

383.--_E.A._

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

These initials are placed in a medallion; they are worked in satin stitch and overcast, and in applique on muslin. For that part of the pattern in which the name is to be embroidered the material is taken double.

384.--_Elisabeth_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

This word is embroidered in satin stitch and overcast. A few small eyelet-holes break the monotony of the outlines, and give lightness to this name.

[Illustration: 384.--Elisabeth.]

 

385.--_Elise_.

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 12 and 16.

The open part of these letters is ornamented by one or more dots; the thick work is raised over chain stitches worked in No. 12, a rather coarser cotton.

[Illustration: 385.--Elise.]

386.--_Emma_. This name is worked in satin stitch; the large dots may be worked with the eyelet-holes in fine overcast, the smaller dots in satin stitch. The remaining letters in raised satin stitch and point de sable.

[Illustration: 386.--Emma.]

 

387.--_F.B._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This elegant monogram is worked in raised satin stitch, the inside embroidered with lace. The leaves and tendrils are worked in satin stitch and point de sable.

[Illustration: 387.--F.B.]

 

388.--_F.S._

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 16 and 20.

The initials "F.S." are placed in the pages of an open book, the outlines of which are worked in overcast, the sides in point de pois. The wreath of flowers which surrounds the book is embroidered in satin stitch, the tendrils and veinings are in overcast. The initials are worked in fine satin stitch.

[Illustration: 388.--F.S.]

 

389.--_Fanny._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

 

This name is simply worked in satin stitch and overcast.

 

[Illustration: 389.--Fanny.]

 

390.--_Francis._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

The initial letter of this elegant design is worked in fine over-casting; the centre star in raised satin stitch with lace in the middle; the leaves surrounding it in veined satin stitch; the other letters are worked in plain satin stitch; and the dots of the line in point de poste.
[Illustration: 390.--Francis.]

391.--_E.C._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

The initials "E.C." are worked within a frame of overcast outlines and satin stitch dots. Vine-leaves and grapes worked in point de pois and eyelet-holes are placed as ornaments around the frame.

[Illustration: 391.--E.C.]

 

392.--_Gordon_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

 

This pretty name being worked in raised satin stitch, is very suitable for gentlemen's handkerchiefs.

 

[Illustration: 391.--Gordon.]

 

393.--_Helene_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

We give the French version of this pretty name, it being easily changed to English "Helen" by omitting the final _e_ in working. The name is worked in plain satin stitch, slightly raised at the thickest parts of the letters.

[Illustration: 393.--Helene.]

 

394.--_H.D.G._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

 

This elegant design is worked in fine overcast and satin stitch, and point de russe.

 

[Illustration: 394--H.D.G.]

395--_Jessie._ This design is very simple to work, the letters being so clear and well defined. The thick satin stitch is scalloped in parts.

[Illustration: 395.--Jessie.]

 

396.--_J.C._

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 12.

 

The letters "J.C." are worked in raised satin and overcast stitch, the thickest part of each letter being worked in scallops.

 

[Illustration: 396.--J.C.]

 

397.--_Lina_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

 

This name is worked in raised veined satin stitch; the small stars are worked in point russe round eyelet-holes.

 

[Illustration: 397. Lina.]

 

398.--_Lizzie_.

 

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This name is worked partly in satin stitch, partly in raised dots and fine overcast; the letters are in the Greek style, and have an excellent effect if well worked.

[Illustration: 398.--Lizzie.]

 

399.--_L.G.A._

 

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20, and Linen Thread No. 16.