Get Your Free Goodie Box here

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth by Robert A. Albano - HTML preview

PLEASE NOTE: This is an HTML preview only and some elements such as links or page numbers may be incorrect.
Download the book in PDF, ePub, Kindle for a complete version.

index-1_1.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNDERSTANDING 

 

THE 

 

POETRY 

 

OF 

 

WILLIAM 

 

WORDSWORTH 

 

 

 

 

UPWW

 

 

 

 

UNDERSTANDING 

THE POETRY 

OF 

WILLIAM 

WORDSWORTH 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by 

 

 

Robert A. Albano 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MERCURYE PRESS 

 

Los Angeles

 

UNDERSTANDING THE POETRY  

OF WILLIAM WORDSWORTH 

 

Robert A. Albano 

 

 

First Printing: December 2009 

 

 

 

 

 

All Rights Reserved © 2009 by Robert A. Albano No  part  of  this  book  may  be  reproduced  or  transmitted  in any  form  or  by  any  means,  graphic,  electronic,  or mechanical,  including  photocopying,  recording,  taping,  or by  any  information  storage  retrieval  system,  without  the written permission of the publisher. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MERCURYE PRESS 

 

Los Angeles

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

 

1.  Wordsworth and the Romantic Period 7 

 

2.  Tintern Abbey (explication) 

 

 

17 

 

3.  The Intimations Ode (explication) 43 

 

 

 

“Tintern Abbey” (complete poem)   

 

79 

 

 “Intimations Ode” (complete Poem) 85 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER 1 

 

WORDSWORTH AND THE 

ROMANTIC PERIOD 

 

 

 

 

WORDSWORTH’S EARLY YEARS 

 

 

William Wordsworth was most certainly one of the most  influential  of  the  Romantic  poets.    During  the  era  of the Romantics in the early nineteenth century, Wordsworth wrote  many  great  poems.    Two  of  the  best  are  “Lines Composed  a  Few  Miles  above  Tintern  Abbey”  and  “Ode: Intimations  of  Immortality.”    These  two  poems  reflect several  motifs  or  ideas  that  are  common  to  the  Romantic poets,  especially  (1)  a  reverence  for  nature  and  (2)  the idealization of childhood. 

 

 

William Wordsworth was born in 1770 and died in 1850.    His  poetry  often  focused  on  the  relationship between man and nature.  Like all of the Romantic poets, his work shows a remarkable contrast to the literature of the previous era, the Neoclassic Age. 

 

 

Where  the  Neoclassicists  were  organized  or structured,  orderly,  and  artificial  in  their  approach,  the Romantics  were  unlimited  or  boundless,  free,  and  natural.  

Where  the  Neoclassicists  placed  an  emphasis  on  reason, the Romantics emphasized emotion.  

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth Neoclassicists 

Romantics 

organized, structured 

unlimited, boundless 

orderly 

free 

artificial 

natural 

Reason 

Emotion 

 

 

Wordsworth’s  poetry  is  also  remarkable  for  being both  simple  and  complex  at  the  same  time.    Wordsworth presents complex ideas and philosophical concepts through a simple subject matter and language.  

 

 

The second of five  children, Wordsworth was born in  northeast  England  in  1770.    In  1778  Wordsworth’s mother  died;  and  his  father,  who  had  earlier  been  rather successful in business, found himself in debt.  However, his father  did  manage  to  send  young  William  to  a  good boarding school when the boy was nine years old.  Prior to that,  William  received  most  of  his  education  from  his mother. 

 

 

Disaster struck again for Wordsworth when he was thirteen  years  of  age  (in  1783).    His  father  died.  

Wordsworth was fortunate, though, that his uncles became his  new  guardians;  and  they  saw  to  it  that  Wordsworth continued his education at the boarding school Wordsworth graduated at age 17 (in 1787) and then enrolled at Cambridge University.  His guardians expected him  to  be  a  clergyman,  a  member  of  the  church,  when  he graduated. 

  

 

Before  he  graduated,  the  20-year-old  Wordsworth took  a  break  from  his  studies  in  1790  in  order  to  take  a 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 9

walking  tour  through  the  Alps,  the  mountain  range  in central  Europe  and  ranging  along  the  borders  of Switzerland,  France,  Italy,  Germany,  and  Austria.    This experience  with  nature  –  among  others  –  convinced  the gifted scholar that the life of the clergy was not for him. 

 

 

In  1791  Wordsworth  graduated  with  honors  from Cambridge.    He  then  moved  to  London.    A  few  months later  Wordsworth  moved  again,  this  time  to  France.    He fell  in  love  with  a  French  girl  there.    Her  name  was Annette Vallon. 

 

 

In  the  following  year  (1792)  Wordsworth  and  his girlfriend  Annette  had  a  child,  a  daughter  whom  they named Caroline.  However, a lack of money as well as the growing  tensions  between  England  and  France  forced Wordsworth  to  return  to  England  without  his  fiancé  and daughter. 

 

 

Wordsworth’s  experiences  in  the  Alps  became  the subject  matter  for  his  first  published  work  in  1793, Descriptive Sketches.  The poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge hailed  the  work  and  lavishly  praised  Wordsworth  as  “the best poet of the age.” 

 

 

Because of his ties to France, the years prior to the French  Revolution  were  ones  of  great  despair  and suffering  for  Wordsworth.    Wordsworth  worried  about  the political crisis and how it was affecting Annette Vallon and his daughter Caroline.   

 

 

Later, in 1797, with his sister Dorothy, Wordsworth moved  to  Somerset,  in  southern  England.    The  time  he spent there contributed significantly in restoring his mental 

10 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth health.    At  Somerset  Wordsworth  became  close  friends  to Samuel  Taylor  Coleridge.    The  two  intellectual  men shared a passion for poetry, and they influenced the writing of each other in numerous and profound ways. 

 

PREFACE TO LYRICAL BALLADS 

 

 

In  the  following  year,  1798,  Wordsworth  and Coleridge  produced  a  joint  collection  of  poetry  entitled Lyrical  Ballads.    Among  other  poems  in  this  work  is  the highly regarded “Tintern Abbey.” 

 

 

Lyrical  Ballads  was  highly  successful,  and  it entered a second edition in 1800 and a third edition in 1802.  

For the second edition, Wordsworth added a Preface.  And in the 1802 edition he expanded that Preface even further. 

 

 

This Preface today stands as what critics refer to as the  pivotal  turning  point  of  English  Romantic  criticism.  

They  also  use  the  word  “manifesto”  to  describe  it.    The word  manifesto  is  often  used  in  politics  when  a  political party or organization wishes to declare its goals or principle guidelines  or  intentions.    To  call  Wordsworth’s  Preface  a manifesto,  then,  suggests  that  it  somehow  collectively represents  the  unified  thoughts  of  the  Romantic  poets.

Nothing  could  have  been  further  from  Wordsworth’s intentions.    The  poet  was  not  issuing  any  kind  of  political statement, nor was he suggesting that any type of organized movement enveloped the Romantic writers.   

 

 

Yet, nevertheless, his Preface does encapsulate the trends  and  development  of  poetry  in  his  age.    The Preface  examines  the  subject  matter  and  language  of poetry  as  well  as  addressing  the  question,  “What  is  a 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 11

poet?”    Although  the  Preface  is  too  lengthy  and complicated to examine adequately in this introduction, the student  should  be  aware  of  some  of  the  key  concepts  that appear in it. 

  

KEY CONCEPTS OF THE PREFACE 

 

 

(1)  First,  Wordsworth  defines  poetry  as  the spontaneous  overflow  of  powerful  feelings.    Unlike  the Neoclassicists,  who  kept  their  emotional  voice  in  check, Wordsworth declares that an abundance of emotions forms the core of poetry.  Such feelings exist within the poet as a result from his contact with nature, which exists outside or separate from the poet. 

 

 

(2) Second, Wordsworth declares that poetry is free from  rules.    The  poet  is  free  to  explore,  bend,  and  even break the conventions of poetry.  No established meters or rhythm need to be followed.  And ideas or concepts can be explored as freely as rhythmical patterns. 

 

 

(3)  Third,  nature  forms  the  primary  subject matter  of  poetry.    And  nature  becomes,  in  a  sense,  a reflection of the poet’s own soul.   

 

 

(4)  Fourth,  ordinary  items,  everyday  objects,  the commonplace  are  endowed  with  a  special  quality  or glory.    The  poet  may  esteem  and  honor  a  tree,  a  small stream,  or  even  a  little  child.    Such  are  wonderful  and marvelous creations of nature. 

 

 

(5) Fifth, the beauty of  nature contains a strange or even supernatural quality that affects the beholder in a positive and spiritual manner. 

12 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth One  must  keep  in  mind,  though,  that  Wordsworth was not establishing rules here.  He was merely recording his  thoughts  on  the  nature  of  poetry  during  his  age  –

especially  as  it  appears  in  his  own  poems  and  those  by Coleridge. 

 

 

Wordsworth,  like  all  of  the  Romantics,  believed  in the Individualism of the poet.  Poets should not conform to rules,  and  Wordsworth  would  definitely  not  want  other poets to use his poems as inspiration for their own creations or to imitate his own style of writing poetry. 

 

AFTER LYRICAL BALLADS 

  

 

After  the  third  edition  of  Lyrical  Ballads  was printed,  Wordsworth  also  was  able  to  settle  his  personal affairs.  In 1802 Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy took a trip  to  France.    There  he  met  his  former  girlfriend  and  his ten-year-old daughter.  William helped them out financially, but the love that William Wordsworth and Annette Vallon once felt for one another no longer existed. 

 

 

Later that same  year, William Wordsworth married Mary  Hutchinson,  a  friend  whom  he  had  known  since childhood.  Their marriage  was a successful one, and they had five children. 

 

 

Wordsworth  scholars  generally  point  to  the  years from 1797 and 1807 as the period when Wordsworth wrote his greatest poetry.  Of course, this time frame includes the poems  found  in  Lyrical  Ballads.    And  it  also  includes  the 

“Intimations Ode,” which first appeared in 1807. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 13

 

Several  critics  suggest  that  Wordsworth’s  poetry after  1807  does  not  measure  up  to  that  which  he  wrote earlier.  However, Wordsworth’s reputation as a great poet continued to grow over the next few decades.   

 

 

In fact, as late as 1843, more than a decade after the Romantic  movement  had  ended  in  England,  Wordsworth was  honored  with  the  title  of  Poet  Laureate.    He  was declared as the chief poet of England. 

 

 

William Wordsworth died in 1850.  He was the last survivor of the six truly great Romantic poets.  Keats died in  1821,  Shelley  in  1822,  Byron  in  1824,  Blake  in  1827, and Coleridge in 1834.  The final chapter on Romanticism was now at an end. 

 

14 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth THE PRIMARY TOPICS OF WORDSWORTH’S POEMS 

  

 

(1) First, Wordsworth viewed nature as a teacher.  

Nature instructs all of us when we are  young and prepares us for our adult lives. 

 

 

(2)  Second,  a  relationship  exists  between childhood  and  adulthood.    Wordsworth  does  not  just mean  this  is  the  obvious  sense.    Rather,  he  points  to  a mystic  or  supernatural  connection  between  these  two distinct stages in life. 

 

 

(3)  Third,  Wordsworth  does  believe  that  there  is meaning  in  life, and such meaning can be apprehended or understood through a relationship with nature. 

 

 

(4) Fourth, despite the positive affect of nature upon man, there also exists a conflict between man and nature.  

At  times  Wordsworth  depicts  nature  as  a  mysterious  or divine  presence.    It  possesses  a  supernatural  quality  that surpasses the understanding of man.  Thus, nature, although an object of beauty, may also be, at the very same time, an object of awe or even fear. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 15

MOTIFS IN ROMANTIC POETRY 

 

 

The  reader  of  William  Wordworth’s  poetry  should attempt  to  discover  which  of  the  motifs  common  to  many romantic  poets  are  included  in  Wordsworth’s  own  work.

There are primarily eight of these motifs to look for. 

  

1. a reverence for nature 

 

2.  nature’s  appearance  is  largely  subjective,  formed  by the response of the human mind 

 

3.  expressionistic  imagery  (images  are  not  realistic  but often  represent  the  internal  thoughts  and  moods  of  the speaker) 

 

4.  the  conflict  between  desire  and  the  mundane  world (not unlike a conflict between reason and emotion) 5. a portrayal of the sensitive, alienated artist 6. praise of the primitive 

 

7. the idealization of childhood 8. the nature of genius 

 

Not all of these motifs will appear in Wordsworth’s poems, but most of them do.  

 

 

 

CHAPTER 2 

 

TINTERN ABBEY 

 

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

 

In  one  of  his  greatest  poems,  “Lines  Composed  a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey,” the speaker recounts a physical  journey  where  he  returns  to  one  of  his  favorite boyhood  haunts,  a  scenic  river  bank.    Yet  more  important than  the  physical  journey  is  the  mental  one,  in  which Wordsworth  recalls  the  past  and  his  memories  regarding the healing power of nature. 

 

 

“Tintern  Abbey”  was  written  in  1798  and  was included  in  Lyrical  Ballads.    The  complete  title  is  “Lines Composed  a  Few  Miles  above  Tintern  Abbey  on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye During a Tour.  July 13, 1798.”   

 

 

The poem pays homage to the restoring powers of nature. 

 

 

The  poem  recounts  an  actual  event  at  an  actual location.    Tintern  Abbey  is  located  in  Wales  in  close proximity  to  Bristol,  Monmouth,  and  Gloucester.    In  the summer  of  1798,  Wordsworth  took  a  walking  tour  there with his sister Dorothy. 

 

18 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth Wordsworth had been there once before, by himself, five years earlier, in 1793.  The year prior to that, in 1792, Wordsworth  had  been  forced  to  leave  his  girlfriend  and their  baby  daughter  in  France.    That  separation  left Wordsworth  feeling  extremely  depressed  and  full  of despair.    But  the  walking  tour  that  he  took  above  Tintern Abbey  contributed  significantly  to  bringing  the  young Wordsworth, then only 23 years old, back to health. 

 

 

In  1798  Wordsworth  returned  to  the  scenic  spot with  his  sister  Dorothy.    His  hope  was  that  the  magical powers of the landscape would affect her as it did him. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 19

STRUCTURE  

 

 

The poem is 159 lines long and is divided into five stanzas.   

 

 

(1)  In  the  first  stanza,  lines  1  to  22,  Wordsworth describes  the  locale  and  mentions  how  it  awakens memories from five years before. 

 

 

(2) In the second stanza, lines 22 to 49, Wordsworth provides  a  flashback  recalling  how  the  beauty  of  nature has  helped  sustain  and  revive  him  at  those  times  in  the past when he felt weary or depressed. 

 

 

(3) The third stanza is brief, comprising lines 49 to 57.    Wordsworth  questions  his  belief,  his  philosophy regarding the power of nature.  But he does not question his own experience. 

 

 

(4) The fourth stanza is the longest, extending from line  58  to  line  111.   In  this  section  Wordsworth contrasts the present moment with his reflections of boyhood. 

 

 

(5) In the fifth and last stanza, from line 111 to 159, Wordsworth focuses on his sister Dorothy and how she is gaining the gifts of Nature that he had obtained in the past.  

Wordsworth depicts nature as a protector or guardian 

 

20 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STANZA 1 

 

The first stanza begins with the following lines: FIVE years have past; five summers, with the length Of five long winters! and again I hear These waters, rolling from their mountain-springs With a soft inland murmur.-- 

 

The  opening  passage  uses  typical  seasonal  imagery,  with summer  representing  a  pleasurable  time  in  life  and  with winter  representing  a  cold  and  harsh  time.    Wordsworth informs us that five years has passed since his last visit. 

  

 

But  the  poet  is  also  suggesting  that  those  past  five years  have  not  been  easy.    Wordsworth  describes  the winters with a simple adjective, long.  The summers are not described in this way.  Wordsworth is indicating that he has experienced more of the harsher moments in life and not so many of the pleasurable ones. 

 

 

With  another  simple  adjective  –  the  word  soft  –

Wordsworth  describes  the  sound  of  the  mountain  springs.  

Wordsworth indicates the  gentleness  and tranquility of the surroundings and offers these up as a contrast to the harsh times of the past five years. 

 

 

The stanza continues: 

 

Once again  

Do I behold these steep and lofty cliffs, That on a wild secluded scene impress Thoughts of more deep seclusion; and connect The landscape with the quiet of the sky. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 21

Wordsworth establishes a connection in these lines between the wild secluded scene of nature and the deeper, secluded thoughts of the speaker.   The speaker is thus connected to nature.    The  word  wild  –  yet  another  simple  adjective  –

may  thus  also  describe  the  thoughts  of  the  speaker.    His thoughts are wild due to his depression or despair. 

 

 

Yet the speaker also establishes another connection, this  time  between  the  wild  landscape  of  nature  and  the quiet  of  the  sky.    The  sky  lends  its  quiet  calm  upon  the wild and unruly growths of nature.  And since the speaker’s thoughts are connected to the landscape, the quiet charm of the sky also affects him.  The speaker absorbs the calm and quiet  presence  of  nature.    And  the  speaker  sits  down  to relax under the shade of the sycamore tree. 

 

The day is come when I again repose Here, under this dark sycamore … 

 

Wordsworth  may  have  specifically  mentioned  the sycamore  because  of  its  symbolism.    In  Egypt  the sycamore is the Tree of Life.  And in the Bible the tree is a symbol  of  rejuvenation.    Of  course,  Wordsworth  finds Nature to have restorative or rejuvenating qualities.  So the symbolism is appropriate. 

 

 

During  the  Renaissance,  the  sycamore  took  on  an entirely  different  meaning.    It  is  associated  with  dejected love or, simply, sad love.  The sycamore appears notably in one of the songs that Desdemona sings in the play Othello.  

This symbolism is also appropriate for Wordsworth, who is sad over having to leave his girlfriend in France.  And quite likely, Wordsworth could have intended both meanings. 

 

22 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth This Renaissance symbolism may have been created by  poets  who  were  always  on  the  look  out  for  puns  and wordplay.  The word sycamore sounds like "sick  amour," 

meaning  a  sick  or  sad  love.    For  Shakespeare's  Othello, another pun could be intended.  Sycamore sounds similar to 

"a  sick  Moor."    Othello  was  a  Moor,  the  Moors  being  a tribe of people in northern Africa.  Othello’s jealousy is a 

“sick amour” or sick love; and, so, Othello is a sick Moor. 

 

 

In describing the landscape, the speaker in “Tintern Abbey” corrects himself. 

 

Once again I see  

These hedge-rows, hardly hedge-rows, little lines Of sportive wood run wild. 

 

The  plants  form  little  lines,  but  they  are  not  hedges.    A hedge refers to plants purposely planted close together in a yard or garden to form a fence or boundary.  In wild nature there  is  no  gardener  to  attend  the  plants.    They  grow naturally,  wildly,  without  order.  Nature  in  this  way resembles Romantic poetry, which is also natural but free from any constrained and restrictive rules. 

 

 

The speaker then observes the farm houses that dot the landscape: 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 23

 

… these pastoral farms,  

Green to the very door; and wreaths of smoke Sent up, in silence, from among the trees!  

With some uncertain notice, as might seem Of vagrant dwellers in the houseless woods, Or of some Hermit's cave, where by his fire The Hermit sits alone. 

 

Wordsworth uses two similes – introduced by the word as in line 19 – to describe the farm houses.  The first simile is that  of  the  vagrants  –  hoboes  or  travelers  –  camping  out beneath  a  tree  in  the  woods.    The  second  simile  is  the comparison to the hermit living in a cave.  Both the woods and  the  cave  are  part  of  nature,  and  Wordsworth  is suggesting that the farms appear to be just as natural.  The farms  have  taken  on  the  attributes  of  nature.    The  smoke sent up from the farmers’ chimneys are silent, like the quiet of the sky.  The farms are serene and peaceful just like the streams  and  wild  woods.    The  final  word  of  the  stanza  is alone.    The  loneliness  compliments  the  seclusion  noted earlier.   

  

 

The  stanza  thus  depicts  nature  with  several  key terms: wild, secluded, quiet, and alone.  The speaker also possesses these qualities.  His own wild nature becomes at rest in the quiet of nature. 

 

  

24 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STANZA 2 

 

 

The second stanza begins with the following lines: These beauteous forms,  

Through a long absence, have not been to me As is a landscape to a blind man's eye. 

 

The  speaker  is  now  connecting  nature  to  himself  and  is describing  the  power  of  that  nature.    Even  though  he  has been away from the beauty of nature for five years, he has not  forgotten  its  beauty  or  its  power.    The  beauty  and power of nature have always been with him.  He can still see its beauty even though he is away from it.   It exists in his memory.  He is not blind to it. 

 

 

The speaker then adds … 

 

But oft, in lonely rooms, and 'mid the din Of towns and cities, I have owed to them In hours of weariness, sensations sweet, Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart; And passing even into my purer mind, With tranquil restoration. 

 

The key word of this passage and perhaps the central theme of  the  entire  poem  is  restoration.    Wordsworth  is describing the restorative power of nature.   

 

 

The  din  or  noise  of  life  in  the  city  is  in  direct contrast to the quiet of nature.   Life in the city is not only noisy, but it fills one with weariness.  And such weariness is not only physical; it is also psychological and emotional. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 25

 

Nature  is  the  solution  to  this  weariness.    It provides  tranquil  restoration.    It  provides  serenity  and peace.  It soothes the nerves and calms the mind. 

  

 

The speaker then adds that the pleasures or gifts of nature ... 

 

… have no slight or trivial influence On that best portion of a good man's life, His little, nameless, unremembered, acts Of kindness and of love. 

 

In  other  words,  the  speaker  is  declaring  that  the  power  of nature  causes  man  to  act  in  good  and  positive  ways.  

Men,  of  course,  are  not  always  kind  and  loving.  

Sometimes they are cruel and hateful.  Wordsworth may be suggesting that such men are cut off from nature.  They are either  physically  away  from  nature  or  they  are  blind  to  it.  

Such men are to be found more often in the city than in the country. 

 

 

Wordsworth,  thus  far,  has  suggested  that  nature provides  at  least  two  gifts  to  man:  (1)  it  restores  men’s troubled or depressed feelings, and (2) it causes men to act in  good,  kind,  and  loving  ways.    But  there  is  yet  another gift that nature provides. 

 

 

Wordsworth  describes  this  third  gift  beginning  at line 35: 

26 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth Nor less, I trust,  

To them I may have owed another gift, Of aspect more sublime; that blessed mood, In which the burthen of the mystery, In which the heavy and the weary weight Of all this unintelligible world, Is lightened: 

 

The adjective sublime, mentioned in line 37, suggests that this  third  gift  has  a  higher  spiritual  value.    The  first  two gifts, restoration and  goodness, are physical,  emotional, or psychological gifts.  But this third gift sustains the spirit or soul of man. 

  

 

The  speaker  explains  that  life  in  general  makes  us feel  like  we  are  carrying  an  enormous  burden  or  load  on our  shoulders.    Life  is  often  difficult.    It  makes  us  tired, exhausted,  weary.    And  this  heavy  load  weighs  down  our spirits,  our  souls.    And,  worse  yet,  we  do  not  understand why this is so.  The speaker tells us it is a mystery.  We feel like we are always carrying this burden or load, but we do not know why. 

 

 

This  third  gift  of  nature,  then,  is  the  uplifting  of our  spirit  or  soul.    Nature  is  our  spiritual  support.    Our spirit  is  stronger  because  of  nature’s  affect  on  it.    And  we are thus able to stand up and move on despite the heaviness that  life  bears  down  upon  us,  upon  our  spirits.    This  third spiritual  gift  also  lasts  us  our  entire  lives,  according  to Wordsworth;  and  once  our  bodies  are  gone,  our  spirit continues as a living soul. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 27

The final three lines of the stanza are these: While with an eye made quiet by the power Of harmony, and the deep power of joy, We see into the life of things.  

 

Wordsworth concludes his second stanza by stating that (1) the  power  of  nature  brings  us  joy  (the  gift  of  restoration when  we  are  feeling  depressed  or  full  of  despair)  and  (2) harmony  or  fellowship  with  other  people  (the  gift  of goodness).      And  (3)  Nature  gives  us  the  ability  to understand  life.    We  see  not  only  the  physical  aspects  of life,  but  we  also  come  to  see  the  spiritual  aspects  of everything in life. 

 

28 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STANZA 3  

 

 

The  third  stanza  is  quite  brief  and  begins  with  the following: 

 

If this  

Be but a vain belief … 

 

The  word  vain  here  could  mean  incorrect,  worthless,  or even  foolish.    Wordsworth  is  questioning  his  philosophy regarding the three gifts of nature.  He wonders whether he might  be  wrong.    But  then  he  supports  his  belief  with  the following: 

 

… yet, oh! how oft--  

In darkness and amid the many shapes Of joyless daylight;  

when the fretful stir  

Unprofitable, and the fever of the world, Have hung upon the beatings of my heart-- 

How oft, in spirit, have I turned to thee, O sylvan Wye! thou wanderer thro' the woods, How often has my spirit turned to thee! 

 

Essentially,  Wordsworth  is  supporting  his  belief  with  his own  experience.    The  word  sylvan  refers  to  the  woods  or forest,  the  word  Wye  is  the  name  of  the  river  near  Tintern Abbey.   

 

 

Wordsworth  uses  personification  to  describe  the river as a wanderer traveling through the woods.  The river becomes alive and thus has a spirit of its own. 

  

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 29

 

Wordsworth may doubt his philosophy, but he does not  doubt  his  memory  or  experience.    He  explains  that, while  he  was  living  in  the  city  and  experiencing  severe bouts of depression, he only needed to think about the Wye River  and  its  surroundings.    Then  he  would  be  restored.  

He  would  no  longer  be  troubled  or  depressed.    He  would then  feel  joy  even  though  he  did  not  physically  leave  the city. 

 

30 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STANZA 4 

 

 

In stanzas two and three, Wordsworth is discussing his first visit above Tintern Abbey in 1793.  In stanza four Wordsworth  then  turns  to  the  present  moment:  his  second visit there five years later, in 1798.  The word now, in line 58, marks this shift.  The return visit brings mixed emotions: With many recognitions dim and faint, And somewhat of a sad perplexity, The picture of the mind revives again: Wordsworth  first  comments  that  he  experiences  sadness and  confusion  at  this  second  visit.    The  sadness  may  be due  to  the  fact  that  he  has  been  away  for  so  long  and  has missed  the  scene  and  the  experience  of  being  there.    The experience is so wonderful and uplifting to him that he may perhaps be wondering why he did not return there sooner.   

 

 

Wordsworth  vaguely  remembers  his  earlier  visit, but he notes that his memories about certain features of the place  are  dim  and  faint.    This  return  visit,  then,  revives those  memories.    The  return  visit  also  brings  pleasure  and pleasing thoughts.  Wordsworth’s pleasure comes from the belief … 

 

That in this moment there is life and food For future years. 

 

In  other  words,  the  memories  that  will  come  from  this second visit will be able to restore him and bring him joy in the many long years ahead when he returns, once again, to the city and lives separated from nature. 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 31

At least, Wordsworth hopes this will be true.  He hopes that the effects of this second visit will be the same as the first. 

 

 

Yet  Wordsworth  also  realizes  that  he  is  no  longer the same man that he was five  years earlier.  And so he is not  certain  that  nature  will  affect  him  in  the  same  way.

Wordsworth  describes  his  younger  self  with  a  simile.    He declares that five years ago he was like a roe.  He was like a  wild  deer  leaping  and  jumping  over  the  hills  and mountains.    Wordsworth  then  extends  his  simile  by suggesting  that  maybe  he  was  more  like  a  deer  being pursued by hunters.  He adds the following: 

 

… more like a man  

Flying from something that he dreads, than one Who sought the thing he loved. 

 

Back  in  1793  Wordsworth  was  flying  from  or  running away  from  himself  and  his  own  dreaded  depression.    He did  not  know  then  the  effect  that  nature  would  have  upon him.  The positive experience was, then, accidental. 

 

 

But  with  the  return  visit  in  1798,  Wordsworth  is running  to  Nature.  Nature is the “thing he loves.”  And, so,  Wordsworth  is  perhaps  wondering  whether  that  happy accident can repeat itself. 

  

 

The fictional character that Wordsworth creates in his  poem  is  not  exactly  the  same  as  the  real  Wordsworth himself.    In  1793  Wordsworth  was  then  23  years  of  age.  

But he indicates that his speaker is a much younger person at that time.  Wordsworth depicts the speaker at the earlier time (in 1793) as a youth, full of innocence. 

 

32 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth For nature then  

(The coarser pleasures of my boyish days, And their glad animal movements all gone by) To me was all in all. 

 

Like many Romantic poets, Wordsworth idealizes youth or childhood.    The  child  is  fully  connected  to  or  integrated with  Nature.    Wordsworth  describes  his  youthful connection  to  Nature  in  terms  of  emotions.    He  is  all appetite,  feelings,  and  love.    There  is  an  emotional connection  between  the  child  and  nature,  and  the innocent  youth  does  not  have  any  need  for  the  three  great gifts of nature that Wordsworth describes in stanza two. 

 

 

With  some  regret,  Wordsworth  declares  that  his time of childhood and youth are over: That time is past. 

 

And all of the wonderful and magnificent emotions that the child receives from nature are also over:  

 

… and all its aching joys are no more. 

 

The adult is no longer in touch with nature; and, so, he can no  longer  feel  the  pure  and  glorious  joy  that  the  child experiences. 

 

 

But the speaker does not regret or mourn the loss of this childhood joy and pleasure.  He comments that Nature provides other gifts to the adult that are just as wonderful and as magnificent as the gifts that the adult has lost.  The speaker now looks upon nature in a new way, far different from his childhood self. 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 33

 

 

Wordsworth explains that, yes, it is true, the adult is forced to listen to the “sad music of humanity.”  The adult is forced to experience the harshness and displeasure of life.

And this sad music of humanity has the power to “chasten and  subdue”  the  adult.    In  other  words,  humanity,  life  in society, can be harmful to us in many ways.  It can get us down and defeat us, as if we were prisoners or slaves to it.  

Adulthood is clearly quite difficult.  But Wordsworth then explains  that  adulthood  is  not  entirely  negative.    There  is something positive to provide balance in our lives. 

 

And I have felt  

A presence that disturbs me with the joy Of elevated thoughts; a sense sublime Of something far more deeply interfused, Whose dwelling is the light of setting suns, And the round ocean and the living air, And the blue sky, and in the mind of man. 

 

The  word  presence  (in  line  94)  suggests  that  there  is something alive, but not human.  Rather, it is spiritual.  The word could indicate, then, the Spirit of Nature.  The word disturbs is used in a positive way here.  This spirit of nature interrupts  Wordsworth  from  his  mundane  or  ordinary problems.   It awakens him to a world outside the ordinary and physical. 

 

 

The  words  elevated  and  sublime  also  indicate  that this  presence  is  high  and  lofty  and  spiritual,  that  it  is beyond  the  scope  of  ordinary  vision  and  understanding.

And  so,  this  presence,  this  spirit  of  nature,  brings  the speaker  a  sense  or  feeling  of  sublime  joy.    It  moves  his soul beyond the worries and cares of the ordinary world. 

  

34 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth And  this  joyful  spiritual  presence  is  everywhere: in  the  sun,  in  the  stars,  in  the  ocean,  and  in  the  sky.    It  is everywhere.    And,  most  importantly,  this  joyful  and sublime spiritual presence enters into the mind of man. 

 

 

Wordsworth  further  defines  or  describes  this Spiritual Presence in the next few lines: A motion and a spirit, that impels All thinking things, all objects of all thought, And rolls through all things. 

 

This spirit is everywhere.  It is in everything and everybody.  

It  is  ubiquitous  or  omnipresent.    It  is  flowing  through everything and everybody. 

 

 

Although  Wordsworth  does  not  directly  call  this spiritual presence God, most Christians would.  God also is everywhere and exists in all people and things.  God also is a  presence  that  flows  through  everything  and  everybody.

Wordsworth,  though,  does  not  feel  that  it  is  necessary  to enter into a religious debate or argument.  He leaves it up to his readers to decide whether they should call this spiritual presence God or not. 

 

 

The  conclusion  of  the  stanza  is  clearly  marked  by the word therefore: 

 

Therefore am I still  

A lover of the meadows and the woods, And mountains; and of all that we behold From this green earth. 

 

Wordsworth  can  no  longer  experience  and  enjoy  nature with the “glad animal movements” of his boyhood.  He no 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 35

longer can become a part of nature on a purely physical and emotional  level.    But  he  still loves  nature  because  now  he can enjoy it on a deeper and far more spiritual level. 

  

 

In  the  final  lines  of  stanza  four,  Wordsworth describes nature metaphorically: The anchor of my purest thoughts, the nurse, The guide, the guardian of my heart, and soul Of all my moral being. 

 

In the first of these five metaphors, Wordsworth describes Nature as the anchor of his purest thoughts.  Like a ship’s anchor,  nature  keeps  man  firm  and  secure  –  but  that security  is  in  goodness  and  benevolence.    Pure  thoughts suggest acting in a good and noble and harmonious manner. 

The 

next 

three 

metaphors 

are 

self-explanatory.  

Wordsworth also describes nature as a nurse, a guide, and the guardian of his heart.  Finally, and most importantly, Wordsworth calls Nature the “soul of all my moral being.”

But the distinction between heart and soul is a crucial one.  

The  word  heart  refers  to  a  person’s  physical  or  emotional self.    Nature  both  guards  and  heals  the  physical  and emotional  aspects  of  the  speaker.    But  the  word  soul connects nature to man’s spiritual self. 

 

 

Nature  exists  within  the  soul  of  man.    The  soul  of man is interfused and intertwined with nature.  The spiritual force of nature is also, then, the spiritual force within man.  

Man  is  a  part  of  nature,  and  cannot  –  or  should  not  –  be separated from it. 

  

36 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STANZA 5 

 

 

In  the  fifth  and  final  stanza  of  “Tintern  Abbey,” 

Wordsworth  mentions  his  traveling  companion,  his  sister Dorothy.  Wordsworth begins the stanza in this way: Nor perchance,  

If I were not thus taught, should I the more Suffer my genial spirits to decay. 

 

The word genial, as the certain critics suggest, could mean creative.    But  the  word  can  also  mean  pleasant  or comforting, and Wordsworth most likely intended all three of  these  meanings.    Wordsworth  is  stating  that  his  genial spirits,  his  good  and  positive  feelings,  would  not  suffer  or decay  in  any  way  even  if  nature  did  not  provide  the spiritual gift that he was previously discussing. 

 

 

And  the  reason  why  this  is  so  is  that  his  sister  is with  him:  “for  thou  art  with  me  here.”    Wordsworth  is experiencing  his  pleasant  holiday  with  his  sister  Dorothy, whom  he  describes  as  his  dearest  friend.    Wordsworth  is extremely happy to share this glorious experience in nature with his sister. 

 

 

The speaker describes his sister as being much like he was when he first visited the location five years earlier.  

He  is  suggesting  that  she  will  experience  that  particular locale  in  nature  just  as  he  did  when  he  was  a  youth  five years earlier. 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 37

 

In thy voice I catch  

The language of my former heart. 

May I behold in thee what I was once. 

 

Actually,  Wordsworth  is  using  a  poetic  conceit  here.    In reality,  Dorothy  was  only  one  year  younger  than Wordsworth  himself.    The  character  of  Dorothy  in 

“Tintern  Abbey”  is  a  fictional  figure  used  for  poetic purposes.  Wordsworth does this because he wants to make a  point,  and  he  also  wants  to  create  a  splendid  poem.  

Wordsworth is not writing a biography here.  Wordsworth is a poet.  He is not a biographer. 

 

 

In  the  fictional  situation  created  in  the  poem,  the character  of  Dorothy  serves  to  remind  Wordsworth  of  his own boyhood, his own youth.  Wordsworth thus hopes and prays  that  Dorothy  will  benefit  from  nature  in  the  same way  that  he  did.    In  the  rough  times  ahead  that  Dorothy, like all people, must face in society, Wordsworth hopes that she will receive the comfort and joy and spiritual protection from Nature. 

 

 

Wordsworth  notes  that  Nature,  personified,  treats those who love her with kindness: Nature never did betray  

The heart that loved her. 

 

Referring  to  Nature  as  “she,”  Wordsworth  once  again explains  how  Nature  sustains  and  comforts  us  during  the rough times of our lives. 

 

38 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth She can so inform  

The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts,  

that neither evil tongues,  

Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith, that all which we behold Is full of blessings. 

  

The word inform (in line 125) means to place within us or to have a lasting effect upon us.  Nature’s effect within us is a lasting one.  It does not disappear. 

 

 

Once  again  Wordsworth  is  explaining  how  nature will cheer us and bless us so that later, when we are in the midst  of  the  woe  and  the  suffering  and  evil  of  life,  we  do not  succumb  or  fall  to  it.    We  are  able  to  get  through  the hard times in life because the power of nature is within us.

The  stanza  shifts  directions  (at  line  134),  beginning  with the word “therefore.” 

 

Therefore let the moon  

Shine on thee in thy solitary walk; And let the misty mountain-winds be free To blow against thee. 

 

In  a  prayer-like  fashion,  Wordsworth  asks  Nature  –  the moon, the mountains, the wind – to bless his sister.   

 

 

The  speaker  also  believes  that  Nature  will  sustain and  comfort  his  sister  as  she  gets  older  and  encounters difficulties of life. 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 39

 

In after years,  

When these wild ecstasies shall be matured Into a sober pleasure. 

 

The speaker believes that his sister will experience the two stages  of  Nature  just  as  he  had.    As  a  boy  or  young  man, the  speaker  was  one  with  nature,  like  an  animal,  enjoying nature on an emotional level.  But as an adult, the gifts of nature  are  sublime  or  spiritual.    The  speaker  sees  his youthful  sister  experiencing  nature  on  an  emotional  level, but  he  also  believes  that  she  will  also  later  experience nature on a spiritual level later, after they end their journey. 

  

 

Thus, Nature will heal and comfort Dorothy in later years  whenever  she  experiences  the  “solitude,  or  fear,  or pain,  or  grief”  that  is,  unfortunately,  so  much  a  part  of living. 

 

 

The  speaker  concludes  by  foreseeing  his  own death  –  a  time  when  he  “no  more  can  hear”  his  sister’s voice.  But he adds that his sister will have one more  gift related to nature that he did not have earlier.  Dorothy will have the memory of having shared Nature with her brother William. 

 

We stood together. 

 

 

In  his  concluding  section,  Wordsworth  once  again describes  his  relationship  with  Nature  in  religious  terms.  

He is “a worshipper of Nature” and has for Nature a “zeal of holier love.” 

 

40 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth Wordsworth loves nature in the same manner that a good  Christian  loves  God.    But  Wordsworth’s  love  is increased  or  enhanced  all  the  more  because  he  is  able  to share that love with his sister Dorothy, whom he also loves. 

 

 

In  the  final  five  lines  of  the  poem,  Wordsworth predicts  that  his  sister  Dorothy  will,  many  years  in  the future,  continue  to  remember  this  single  experience  in Nature with fondness and love for two reasons: (1) because the  gifts  of  nature  will  sustain  and  comfort  her  during difficult  times;  and  (2)  because  she  will  remember  having shared  this  experience  with  her  dear  and  close  brother, whom she also loves. 

  

 

And  William  Wordsworth  is  also  comforted  in knowing  that  he  has  shared  the  experience  in  nature  with the sister whom he loves: 

 

These steep woods and lofty cliffs, And this green pastoral landscape, were to me More dear, both for themselves and for thy sake! 

 

And,  so,  for  the  speaker,  the  return  journey  to  the  Wye River above Tintern Abbey in 1798 also brings two gifts: (1) the speaker is able to recall with gladness and fondness his earlier  visit  five  years  earlier.    In  so  doing,  he  is  able  to understand  and  appreciate  the  gifts  of  nature.    And  (2)  he will now have the comforting knowledge that he has shared his  love  of  nature  and  its  gifts  with  his  own  dear  and cherished  sister  and  that  she  too  will  experience  the powerful  and  sublime  force  of  nature  herself  in  the  many years to come. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 41

 

Many  modern  critics  praise  “Tintern  Abbey”  and note that it was Wordworth’s first poem to create a mythos surrounding  nature.    Nature  is  a  mythic  force,  a  powerful force,  a  god-like  force  that  blesses  and  protects  mankind.

The poem connects the inner world of the mind with the external  world  of  nature.    Nature  is  thus  infused  within the inner being of man. 

 

 

When the book, Lyrical Ballads, appeared in 1798, it  introduced  a  new  age  of  poetry.    That  book,  and especially  the  poem  “Tintern  Abbey,”  ushered  in  a  new style  and  spirit  of  poetry.    And  that  new  style  was Romanticism. 

 

  

 

 

CHAPTER 3 

 

THE INTIMATIONS ODE 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION: MY HEART LEAPS UP 

 

 

Wordsworth 

expanded 

upon 

the 

concepts 

introduced  in  “Tintern  Abbey”  in  the  following  years.

Wordsworth  had  already  indicated  that  the  supernatural  or spiritual gifts of youth are lost, but not entirely forgotten, as a  person  reaches  adulthood.    Further,  the  memory  of  that spiritual  power  helps  to  sustain  us  even  during  the  most troubled and turbulent times of our lives. 

 

 

In  1802,  just  a  few  years  after  he  wrote  “Tintern Abbey,”  Wordsworth  wrote  another  of  his  greatest  works, the “Intimations Ode.”  The complete title of this poem is 

“Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood.”  Wordsworth introduces the poem with the  final  three  lines  of  another,  shorter  poem  that  he  had written  just  a  little  time  earlier,  also  in  1802.    That  poem, entitled “My Heart Leaps Up,” is only nine lines long. 

 

My heart leaps up when I behold  

A rainbow in the sky: 

So was it when my life began;  

So is it now I am a man;  

So be it when I shall grow old,  

Or let me die!  

The Child is father of the Man;  

I could wish my days to be  

Bound each to each by natural piety. 

  

44 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth The entire poem appears to be rather simple.  The speaker enjoys  the  beauty  of  nature,  symbolized  by  the  rainbow.  

And  the  speaker  adds  that  such  appreciation  of  nature occurs from the time he  is a child to the time he  is an old man. 

 

 

But  then  the  puzzling  seventh  line  appears:  “The Child  is  father  of  the  Man.”    The  line  is  open  to interpretation,  but  the  reader  should  recall  the  relationship between  man  and  nature  as  Wordsworth  expressed  it  in 

“Tintern  Abbey.”    In  “Tintern  Abbey”  the  poet  suggests that  a  child  enjoys  nature  on  a  purely  physical  and emotional  level.    But  as  an  adult,  he  enjoys  nature  on  a deeper  and  sublime  level.    He  enjoys  nature  on  a  spiritual level.    The  childhood  self  thus  teaches  and  prepares  the adult self for life.  The adult self is born from the childhood self. 

 

 

A similar concept is suggested in the seventh line of

“My Heart Leaps Up” and is explored at a far deeper level in “Ode: Intimations of Immortality.” 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 45

ODE 

 

 

The term ode comes from the classical age of Rome and is usually described as a lyrical poem having a high or exalted  style.    The  form  of  the  ode  often  employs  a  rise and  fall  of  emotional  power.    During  the  Classical  Age, odes were frequently sung at public festivals or in drama. 

 

 

Not surprisingly, Wordworth's own “Ode” has been set  to  music  three  times.  Arthur  Somervell's  version appeared  in  1907.      Gerald  Finzi's  cantata  Intimations  of Immortality  premiered  in  1950.    It  was  also  recorded  by Ron  Perlman  on  a  1989  album  entitled  Of  Love  &  Hope, inspired by the television show Beauty & the Beast, starring Ron Perlman and Linda Hamilton. 

  

46 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STRUCTURE 

 

 

Wordsworth  divides  his  “Ode”  into  eleven  stanzas of varying length.   

(1)  In  the  first  stanza,  the  speaker  notes  how,  as  a  youth, earth possessed a celestial or heavenly quality. 

(2) But in the second stanza, the speaker notes how, as he became older, that celestial quality began to disappear. 

(3) In the third stanza, the speaker, as an adult, experiences conflicting emotions – grief and joy. 

(4) In the fourth stanza, the speaker employs his memory to recall the past experience of youth.  And he wonders what has happened to that lost vision of childhood. 

(5)  In  stanza  five,  the  speaker  elaborates  on  how  the heavenly vision of childhood dies away. 

(6) In the next stanza, the poet then comes back to the adult and his experience on earth. 

(7)  But  in  the  seventh  stanza,  he  returns  to  the  topic  of childhood and refers to the child as an actor and imitator. 

(8)  And  in  the  eighth  stanza  the  speaker  also  notes  how, rather ironically, the child is all too anxious to grow up. 

(9)  In  the  ninth  stanza  the  poet  uses  the  word  benediction to indicate that the adult can experience the pleasures of the past. 

(10)  In  the  tenth  stanza,  the  speaker  philosophically accepts the change in how he experiences nature as a child and adult. 

(11)  And  in  the  final  stanza  the  speaker  becomes reconciled to the relationship between mankind and nature. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 47

STANZA 1 

 

 

In Stanza One, the speaker begins with “there was a time.”  He is referring to his time of youth.  He is referring to his childhood. 

 

There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream, The earth, and every common sight, To me did seem  

Apparelled in celestial light. 

 

The word appareled means dressed or covered.  Everything in nature appears to be bathed or infused with a celestial or heavenly presence.  Nature possesses a spiritual quality.  It possesses  a  wonderful  or  marvelous  quality  that  is  more like a dream than reality.   

 

 

The poet then uses the simile “of a dream” (in line 5).    The  experience  of  Nature  is  a  marvelous  and enchanting  dream  for  the  youth.    But  for  the  adult,  the experience is not the same:  

 

It is not now as it hath been of yore. 

 

The  word  yore  refers  to  the  time  of  the  past.    Here, specifically,  it  refers  to  the  time  of  childhood.    But  the word  now  refers  to  the  time  of  adulthood.    The  adult experience of nature is different from that of the child. 

 

 

The stanza concludes with this line: The things which I have seen I now can see no more. 

  

48 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth The adult cannot feel or experience the celestial presence of nature.    The  adult  does  not  have  that  direct  spiritual connection to nature that he once had as a child.  There is a tone of regret or sadness regarding this loss. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 49

STANZA 2 

 

 

In Stanza Two, the speaker notes that, as an adult, he  can  still  appreciate  and  marvel  at  the  beauty  of nature.    He  still  is  pleased  with  the  loveliness  of  the rainbow  and  the  rose  and  the  moon.    He  still  enjoys  the reflection of the stars on a lake at night.  He still loves the shining sun. 

  

 

However,  the  speaker  regrets  losing  the  celestial experience with nature that he had as a child: But yet I know, where'er I go,  

That there hath past away a glory from the earth. 

 

The  speaker  is  sad  that  he  can  no  longer  experience  that glorious heavenly connection to nature. 

 

50 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STANZA 3 

 

 

The poet begins the third stanza with the word now.  

He is referring to the present time when he is now an adult. 

Despite  the  beauty  of  nature,  the  speaker  feels  regret  and sadness:  

 

To me alone there came a thought of grief. 

 

The youthful connection to nature that he has lost fills him with  grief.    However,  the  speaker  quickly  thinks  about something to alleviate and remove his sadness: A timely utterance gave that thought relief. 

 

The  word  utterance  simply  means  something  said  or uttered.    Some  critics  interpret  this  word  to  suggest  a specific  poem,  such  as  “My  Heart  Leaps  Up.”    But  more likely  the  word  utterance  refers  to  a  concept  or  idea.  It refers to the idea that is expressed in the following lines of the  stanza.    And  that  idea,  simply  expressed,  is  the  joy  of nature.  And this joy in nature is so powerful that it brings relief to the speaker.  It makes him strong (as mentioned in line  24).    In  fact,  he  feels  so  strong  that  he  vows  that  his sadness will never return:  

 

No more shall grief of mine the season wrong. 

 

 

As  noted  earlier,  traditionally  the  ode  has  the  form of  rising  and  falling  emotional  power  or  intensity.    In Wordsworth’s  “Ode,”  the  poet  has  taken  his  readers through the celestial exuberance of youth and the regret of the  adult  in  the  first  two  stanzas.    And  in  the  third  stanza the poet has quickly moved from grief to joy. 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 51

 

 

The  remaining  lines  of  the  third  stanza  are  much like  a  simple  song:  the  speaker  delights  in  the  glories  and pleasures of nature.  It is a song about the joy one can find in nature. 

 

I hear the Echoes through the mountains throng, The Winds come to me from the fields of sleep, And all the earth is gay;  

Land and sea  

Give themselves up to jollity,  

And with the heart of May  

Doth every Beast keep holiday;-- 

Thou Child of Joy,  

Shout round me, let me hear thy shouts, thou happy Shepherd-boy! 

 

The shepherd  boy mentioned in the last line of the stanza refers literally to boys who work as shepherds and who are thus  more  closely  connected  to  nature.    But  the  shepherd boy  is  also  symbolic  of  any  child  who  is  connected  to nature, including the speaker himself when he was a child.   

 

52 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STANZA 4 

 

 

The  song  of  the  joy  in  nature  continues  into  the fourth stanza.  The  adult speaker witnesses the joy  around him. 

  

Ye blessed Creatures, I have heard the call Ye to each other make; I see  

The heavens laugh with you in your jubilee; My heart is at your festival,  

My head hath its coronal. 

 

The word creatures can refer directly to the shepherd boys mentioned previously.  They are like wild animals in nature, enjoying  it,  fully  part  of  it.    The  word  coronal  refers  to  a crown  of  flowers.    Shepherds  might  wear  such  crowns  or circlets of flowers during festivals and holidays.  Of course, it is a naturally-made crown.  It is a crown symbolizing the beauty  of  nature.    In  stanza  four,  the  adult  speaker  states that  he  is  wearing  such  a  crown.    He  is  indicating  that  he feels the beauty of nature within himself. 

 

 

Thus,  the  speaker  shares  the  joy  and  the  bliss  that the younger boys experience.  He declares the following: I feel--I feel it all.  

 

Their joy rubs off on him.  The speaker then suggests that feeling grief – feeling sad or sudden – is wrong or perhaps even  evil  when  there  is  so  much  joy  going  on  all  around him:  

 

Oh evil day! if I were sullen. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 53

No  one  should  be  sad,  the  speaker  is  saying,  when  the pleasures  of  nature  surround  him  every  day.    The  speaker even uses the word joy directly a few lines later: I hear, I hear, with joy I hear! 

 

Nature still provides the adult with pleasures and joy. 

 

 

However,  a  change  or  shift  occurs  in  line  51 

(beginning with the word but).  There is a shift in both tone and  direction.    There  is  also,  once  again,  a  shift  in emotional  intensity.    The  emotion  moves  from  joy  to regret. 

  

But there's a Tree, of many, one, A single Field which I have looked upon, Both of them speak of something that is gone: The Pansy at my feet  

Doth the same tale repeat:  

Whither is fled the visionary gleam?  

Where is it now, the glory and the dream? 

 

In  looking  at  nature,  the  adult  speaker  realizes  that something is different.  Nature no longer appears the same to  him.    Nature  no  longer  produces  the  same  feelings  or emotions  within  him.    He  has  looked  at  the  tree  and  the field  before,  as  a  child.    Then  such  objects  in  nature produced  marvelous  sensations  and  remarkable  passions within him.  The adult  speaker  wonders  why  he  can  no longer feel the same way. 

54 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth The words glory and dream (in line 57) connect the poem back to line 5, back to the first stanza.  The speaker is wondering  how  that  celestial  or  heavenly  experience  and connection  with  nature  that  he  had  as  a  child  could disappear.    “Where  did  it  go?”  he  is  asking.    The  speaker wants to feel the full joy of nature; he wants to be like the shepherd boys.  But the bliss he feels is only temporary.  It begins to disappear. 

 

 

The speaker ponders the memories of his childhood experience with nature.  He wishes he could enjoy nature as he  did  then.      He  would  like  to  be  fully  integrated  with nature, to be one with nature once more.  But as an adult, that is impossible. 

  

 

Thus,  the  speaker  feels  a  sense  of  regret.    He  also feels  a  sense  of  longing  for  the  past.    He  wants  to  be  a child once again.  He would like to have that special dream-like magic that a child has in his connection to nature. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 55

STANZA 5 

 

 

In  the  fifth  stanza,  William  Wordsworth  becomes metaphysical.  Metaphysics is a branch of philosophy that covers, among other topics, the study of being –  the study of existence. 

 

 

In the beginning of the fifth stanza, Wordsworth  is no  longer  talking  about  the  relationship  between  man  and child.  Rather, he is talking about the nature of the soul. 

 

Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting: The Soul that rises with us, our life's Star, Hath had elsewhere its setting,  

And cometh from afar. 

 

Departing from Christian beliefs, the poet is stating that the soul  exists  long  before  the  birth  of  the  body.    The  soul exists  long  before  we  are  born,  even  before  we  are conceived. 

 

 

Thus,  when  Wordsworth  states  that  “birth  is  but  a sleep,” he is suggesting that the soul itself has been asleep.  

At birth, the soul wakes up.  But it has forgotten its earlier existence. 

 

 

Wordsworth  also  uses  the  metaphor  of  the  star  to describe  the  soul.    The  soul  is  a  bright  heavenly  light  that has been in existence for thousands of years.  When we are born, according to Wordsworth, this bright heavenly light –

our  soul  –  travels  down  from  the  heavens,  from  its  place near God, and enters our body. 

  

56 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth Yet,  the  soul  has  not  completely  forgotten everything  about  its  earlier,  heavenly  existence.    The  soul still has vague memories of its earlier existence when it was a light up in the sky, without a body. 

 

Not in entire forgetfulness,  

And not in utter nakedness,  

But trailing clouds of glory do we come From God, who is our home. 

 

Thus,  the  soul  still  remembers  its  spiritual  or  heavenly nature,  and  the  mind  of  the  young  child  shares  that memory.  And, so, the poet declares … 

 

Heaven lies about us in our infancy! 

 

Our  physical  or  earthly  existence  is  still  connected  to  that heavenly  spark,  the  soul.    And  when  we  are  infants, Wordsworth  is  declaring,  we  are  closest  to  that  heavenly part of the soul.   

 

 

But as we get older, the connection diminishes and eventually  disappears.    A  shift  in  stanza  5  then  occurs  (at line 67): 

 

Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing Boy. 

 

Earth, and especially the human  body,  is  a  prison  of  the soul.    The  soul  is  trapped  in  the  body  and  is  unable  to ascend into the heavens where it came from. 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 57

 

 

Yet,  in  our  childhood,  we  are  still  able  to  see  the heavenly  light  that  is  shining  within  us.    The  child  is  still connected to his soul and is able to see or feel the heavenly light of that soul.  And the light of that soul fills the child with joy (as noted in line 70). 

 

 

Wordsworth  then  uses  a  metaphor  to  describe  the process of growing up: 

 

The Youth, who daily farther from the east Must travel … 

  

The poet metaphorically describes growing up as a journey that  everyone  must  take  –  a  journey  from  the  east  to  the west.    The  sun  rises  in  the  east  and  sets  in  the  west.    The east thus symbolizes the beginning of the day, and the west symbolizes the end of the day.  And, by extension, the east can  symbolically  represent  the  beginning  of  life,  and  the west can symbolize the end of life or death. 

 

 

The  sun  is,  of  course,  an  extremely  appropriate symbol  for  this  particular  poem  since  it  is,  after  all,  a heavenly light. 

 

 

At  the  end  of  the  fifth  stanza,  Wordsworth  notes how the heavenly  light  of  the  soul  disappears as a  child grows into manhood. 

 

At length the Man perceives it die away, And fade into the light of common day. 

 

58 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STANZA 6 

 

 

In  the  short  sixth  stanza,  the  poet  now  focuses  on the adult.  Although the heavenly light of the soul is gone, although  the  adult  can  no  longer  experience  the  heavenly pleasure  and  joy  of  the  soul,  he  has  earthly  pleasures  to take their place. 

 

 

The  earth  is  described  metaphorically  as  a  gentle mother  and  a  friendly  nurse.    Yet  earth  is  not  the  true mother.  She is only a foster mother.  Man’s true essence is his soul, and the soul is born in the heavens, not on earth. 

 

 

But since the adult man no longer can remember his heavenly  existence,  the  earth  comforts  him  and  helps  him to … 

 

Forget the glories he hath known, And that imperial palace whence he came. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 59

STANZA 7 

 

 

The  speaker  returns  to  the  child  again  in  stanza seven.    Even  as  early  as  age  6,  the  child  begins  to  move away from his spiritual or heavenly self and move into his earthly  existence.    Wordsworth  describes  the  child  as being … 

 

Fretted by sallies of his mother's kisses, With light upon him from his father's eyes! 

 

The  mother  here  is  Mother  Earth,  the  father  is  the Heaven.  The earth troubles or disturbs the spiritual nature of the child.  The heavenly light of the soul thus begins to fade at an early age. 

 

 

And  so,  from  about  age  six,  the  child  begins  to adapt to his new earthly environment.  The child begins to plan and shape his life.  He becomes involved with earthly concerns,  and  his  spiritual  nature  becomes  unused  and forgotten. 

 

 

Wordsworth describes human existence as a series of events: 

 

A wedding or a festival,  

A mourning or a funeral. 

 

Life  is  just  an  ongoing  series  of  events  that  everyone becomes involved or enmeshed in.  The activities of life are merely  ones  of  “business,  love,  or  strife.”    Every  life  is similar, Wordsworth suggests.  The lives of the present are not unlike the lives of the past. 

 

60 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth Wordsworth  uses  the  metaphor  of  the  actor  on  a stage  to  describe  life.    The  stage  as  a  metaphor  for  life  in the world was often used by William Shakespeare.  In his comedy As You Like It, for example, one of the characters asserts the following: 

 

All the world’s a stage, 

And all the men and women merely players. 

 

Shakespeare suggests that life is extremely short, not unlike the length of time that it takes for a play to be presented on stage.    On  stage  the  actor  speaks  his  lines,  expresses emotions  such  as  grief  or  joy,  and  acts  according  to  the directions  set  in  the  play.    Then  the  play  ends.    The character exists no more.  Similarly, all of us in life express the same kinds of emotions, act according to the pattern set by life, and then pass away. 

 

 

In  Wordsworth’s  poem,  a  child  is  an  actor.    He imitates  the  adults  around  him,  expressing  the  same emotions, acting in ways that are the same or similar to that of the adult.  But as the child becomes an adult, he is still an  actor.    He  is  still  going  through  the  same  kinds  of emotions and engaging in the same kinds of activities that have gone on before for countless generations.  

 

 

Wordsworth  compares  life,  earthly  existence,  to  an actor  playing  his  part  on  the  humorous  stage.    Here,  the word  humorous  does  not  mean  funny,  even  though  there may  be  a  certain  ironic  humor  about  life.    Rather, Wordsworth is referring to bodily fluids called the humors.  

During  the  Middle  Ages,  people  believed  that  there  were four  dangerous  fluids  –  sanguine,  phlegm,  choler,  and 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 61

melancholy  –  that  somehow  entered  the  blood  and  caused people to act in highly emotional and negative ways.   

 

 

Too  much  sanguine  would  cause  a  person  to  be bloodthirsty  or  violent;  too  much  choler  would  make  him angry or bad-tempered; too much melancholy would make him  depressed  or  gloomy;  and  too  much  phlegm  would make him lazy, sluggish, and unemotional. 

 

 

During  the  Renaissance  writers  of  plays  would often utilize this concept in their comedies where they had overly  emotional  characters.    Such  plays  were  simply called  Humor  Comedies.    The  playwright  Ben  Jonson  is especially noteworthy for writing several of these plays and even  wrote  one  such  play  in  1598  entitled  Every  Man  in his Humour. 

 

 

Perhaps, then, Wordsworth is comparing life to a comedy of the humours.  Life is full of strong and violent emotions.    But  the  Renaissance  comedy  always  had  a happy  ending.    And,  so,  by  extending  the  metaphor, Wordsworth might also see life as having a happy ending. 

 

62 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth STANZA 8 

 

 

In Stanza 8, the poet describes the other side of the child’s nature.  In the previous stanza, the child is an actor or  imitator.    But  in  stanza  eight,  he  is  a  philosopher  and prophet. 

 

 

The  child  thus  has  a  dual  nature,  an  earthly  side and  a  heavenly  side.    He  is  equally  both  body  and  soul.

The stanza begins by addressing the child with these lines: Thou, whose exterior semblance doth belie Thy Soul's immensity. 

 

The  young  child’s  exterior  semblance,  his  human  body,  is quite small.  This size is in startling contrast to the size of the  soul,  which  is  immense.    The  soul  is,  metaphorically speaking, much larger than the body that contains it. 

 

 

The  speaker  also  notes  how  the  child  retains  his heritage  (in  line  111).    The  word  heritage  indicates  what the child has been able to keep within himself regarding his true  heavenly  nature.    The  child  knows  and  innately understands  that  he  is  connected  with  the  infinite.    The child  is  fully  aware  of  his  spiritual  existence.    The speaker then refers to the child as … 

 

Mighty Prophet! Seer blest! 

 

The  child  naturally  sees  and  understands  the  truth  about human life and existence.  The poet uses the word truths, in the plural (at line 115), to indicate the answers to the many questions which men continuously ask regarding the nature of life and the soul and our relationship to the infinite.  The 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 63

child knows or inwardly senses the answers to all of these questions.  But men, adults, have forgotten these answers, these truths. 

 

 

Regarding  these  truths,  the  speaker  tells  us  that adults  may  constantly  struggle  or  toil  to  find  the  answers, but such answers are lost in the darkness.   

 

Which we are toiling all our lives to find, In darkness lost. 

 

Adults are just not capable of seeing these truths. 

 

 

But for the child, the truth is always present.  His immortality always surrounds him: Thou, over whom thy Immortality  

Broods like the Day. 

 

The  word  broods  means  to  surround  and  envelop. 

Immortality  wraps  around  the  child  like  a  blanket.    It  is always  with  him.    The  child  understands  that  he  has  a spiritual nature, and he realizes that this spirit is immortal. 

 

 

The speaker then asks a question of the child: Why with such earnest pains dost thou provoke The years to bring the inevitable yoke, Thus blindly with thy blessedness at strife? 

 

The  question  is  rhetorical:  there  is  no  answer.    A  yoke  is literally a device used by farmers.  It is a leather or wooden harness that is placed over a horse or ox to pull a plow or wagon.  Wordsworth uses the word yoke as a metaphor for 

64 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth life.  All people, like the animal pulling the plow, struggle and sweat in life.  Life is a struggle.  Life is difficult. 

 

 

So, the speaker in the poem is questioning why the child  is  in  such  a  hurry  to  grow  up.    Because,  once  he does  grow  up,  his  life  will  be  difficult.    His  life  will  be  a struggle. 

  

 

This is the puzzle or mystery of life.  The adult has only hardships and problems to contend with.  But the child has a blessed and highly spiritual life. 

 

 

So,  the  speaker  cannot  understand  why  the  child  –

why any of us – wants to give up his blessed and spiritual happiness and replace it with hardship and toil. 

 

 

The  eighth  stanza  ends  with  several  metaphors  to describe  the  burden  of  adulthood.    One  of  these  is 

“earthly  freight.”    Freight  more  generally  refers  to  heavy goods  carried  by  a  ship  or  train.    Thus,  it  symbolizes something heavy  and burdensome.   Life is  also  heavy  and burdensome.    It  is  a  burden  that  is  extremely  difficult  to carry. 

 

 

Wordsworth also describes life as a “weight, heavy as frost.”  Thus, adult life is not only a heavy burden, but it is  also  cold  and  cruel,  like  an  icy  frost  that  shocks  us  and chills us. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 65

STANZA 9 

 

 

Although the eighth stanza ends on a negative note, the  ninth  stanza  quickly  raises  our  emotions  back  up  to  a positive one.  As noted earlier, in the ode there is a rise and fall of emotional power.  In stanza eight there is a definite fall, but the emotions quickly rise in the ninth stanza. 

 

 

The  cause  of  that  joy  is  the  vague  or  distant memory  of  what  we  once  were.    Somehow  there  is  still  a faint  memory  of  our  spiritual  essence.    That  spiritual essence has not entirely  disappeared as we become adults.

Even  though  the  memory  or  thought  of  that  spiritual essence  is  very  small  or  slight,  the  speaker  asserts  that  it gives him a perpetual or everlasting benediction.   

 

 

A  benediction  is  a  blessing.    Like  a  blessing  from God,  the  memory  or  thought  of  his  childhood  spirituality brings him comfort and  solace.   It calms him even though he faces the struggles of life everyday. 

 

 

The speaker clarifies his position.  He states that it is not the simple pleasures of childhood that he is referring to.  These pleasures, delight and liberty, are important and wonderful.  They are “worthy to be blest.”  But the speaker is referring to something far deeper.  He tells us …  

 

Not for these I raise  

The song of thanks and praise. 

 

Instead, the speaker is referring to the faint memory of our childhood  past  that  raises  “obstinate  questionings”  and 

“blank misgivings” within us. 

 

66 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth The  questions  he  asks  are  obstinate  or  stubborn because he never stops asking them.  These questions about life are always within him.  They are part of his spirit. 

 

 

A  misgiving  is  a  feeling  of  uncertainty.    And  the speaker’s feelings of uncertainty are blank because there is no  answer  to  be  seen.    The  uncertainty  remains  uncertain.

The feeling never goes away. 

 

 

Yet  these  doubts,  these  questions,  and  these misgivings bring joy to the speaker.  The speaker describes himself as a “creature” who is … 

 

Moving about in worlds not realised. 

 

An unrealized world means here an unreal world.  Because of  our  shadowy  memory  of  our  spiritual  nature,  the physical  world  around  us  does  not  quite  seem  quite  real.  

We  sense  that  there  is  something  more,  something greater, beyond the mere physical world. 

 

 

By contrast, the  real  world  is  the  world  of  spirit.  

Even though it is beyond our physical comprehension, it is there.  And that spiritual world is the true world for all of us.

 

 

The poet  also refers to the  memory  or  thought  of childhood  spirituality  as  instinct.    He  states  that  our memories or thoughts are … 

 

High instincts before which our mortal Nature Did tremble like a guilty Thing surprised. 

 

There is something deep, internal, and instinctive within all of us – a spark of our spiritual nature – which surprises or 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 67

frightens  our  mortal  nature.    It  frightens  or  surprises  us because we are not sure what it is. 

 

 

Nevertheless,  this  memory  or  instinct  is  a  positive quality.  These memories or instincts … 

 

Are yet the fountain light of all our day, Are yet a master light of all our seeing. 

 

Like  a  fountain  of  water,  there  is  a  nourishing  and cleansing  quality  to  these  instincts  that  are  continually bubbling forward without ceasing.  Like a master light or, perhaps,  like  a  sun,  these  instincts  illuminate  what  is otherwise  dark.    They  help  us  to  see  or  understand  life.  

They help to clarify what is otherwise confusing or unclear.  

 

 

Thus, the instincts or memories of our childhood … 

 

Uphold us, cherish, and have power to make Our noisy years seem moments in the being Of the eternal Silence. 

 

The  instincts  provide  us  with  strength  and  courage.    Our instincts  help  us  to  realize  that  the  “noisy  years”  of adulthood  are  brief  and  matter  little  when  one  sets  them along side of the millions and billions of years that make up all eternity.  

  

 

Wordsworth  then  adds  that  the  truth  or  reality  of these  instincts,  the  truth  of  our  spiritual  essence,  will never  perish.    It  will  never  end.    Nothing  can  abolish  or destroy this truth. 

68 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth Stanza Nine ends with the following lines: Hence in a season of calm weather Though inland far we be,  

Our Souls have sight of that immortal sea Which brought us hither, 

Can in a moment travel thither,  

And see the Children sport upon the shore, And hear the mighty waters rolling evermore. 

 

The season of calm weather is a metaphor for those times when  we  are  feeling  calm  and  at  peace  with  nature  and everything  around  us.    At  such  times  our  spirits  or  souls can  then  get  a  glimpse,  a  sight  of  the  spiritual  world.

For  a  very  brief  moment  our  souls  or  spirits  can  travel upward  from  earth  to  the  heavens  and  get  a  look  at  the children,  the  bodiless  souls,    that  frolic  and  play  in  those heavens, in that spiritual world. 

 

 

In  other  words,  for  an  extremely  brief  moment  we can,  as  adults,  connect  to  that  spirit  world  and experience  the  delight  and  joy  that,  as  children,  we  had constantly enjoyed. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 69

STANZA 10 

 

 

The  joy  of  that  connection,  the  joy  described  in stanza  nine,  continues  into  stanza  ten.    In  fact,  the  entire stanza is a simple one wherein the speaker rejoices for his connection to the spiritual world. 

  

 

The pastoral imagery indicated earlier in the poem also  occurs  here.    Lambs  are  frolicking  and  birds  are chirping amidst the grass and flowers on a beautiful spring day. 

 

Then sing, ye Birds, sing, sing a joyous song!  

And let the young Lambs bound  

As to the tabor's sound! 

We in thought will join your throng, Ye that pipe and ye that play,  

Ye that through your hearts to-day Feel the gladness of the May! 

 

The  adult  speaker  has  not  forgotten  that  his  connection  to his own spiritual nature is less than that of the child.  But he is not sad about that or feels any regret. 

 

What though the radiance which was once so bright Be now for ever taken from my sight. 

 

For  the  speaker,  the  loss  of  that  childhood  pleasure  is  not something to be sad about.  He will not grieve about it. 

 

 

Instead,  the  speaker  notes  three  other  gifts  or pleasures  that  the  adult  retains  because  of  his  spiritual connection: 

70 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth (1)  The  first  gift  is  the  strength  from  “primal sympathy.”    Primal  indicates  or  means  first.    The  poet  is referring  to  that  first  connection  we  have  with  the  spirit when we are children.  Even though that connection seems lost to the adult, he still receives strength from it.  Because the connection was once with us, the speaker indicates that it has never completely left us.  The connection “must ever be” – it continues into our adulthood. 

  

 

(2)  The  second  gift  is  “soothing  thoughts.”    As adults  we  suffer  the  turmoil  and  tribulations  of  life;  we suffer many  rough moments.   But our spiritual connection provides  us  with  an  ability  to  calm  or  soothe  ourselves during those rough times. 

 

 

(3) And the third gift is “faith.”  This is a faith  in our  own  spiritual  essence.    It  is  a  faith  in  our  own immortality.  And because we do have such a strong faith, we are able to look upon death with a “philosophic mind.”

In other words, we  are  able  to  look  upon  death  without fear.  Our bodies will die, but we know that our spirit will live forever. 

 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 71

STANZA 11 

 

 

In  the  final  section,  stanza  eleven,  the  poet  returns to  the  adult’s  earthly  connection,  his  physical  connection, to nature. 

 

And O, ye Fountains, Meadows, Hills, and Groves, Forebode not any severing of our loves! 

 

The  word  forebode  means  to  predict  or  foretell.    The speaker  is  directly  addressing  nature.    In  a  way,  he  is making  a  request  of  nature.    The  speaker  is  asking  nature not  to  predict  or  suggest  any  break  in  the  love  he  has  for nature.  Even though the speaker no longer has the spiritual connection  to  nature  that  he  once  did  as  a  child,  he  still loves nature nevertheless.  The love for nature remains in the adult. 

 

 

Furthermore,  as  an  adult,  the  speaker  can  still  feel the power of nature. 

 

Yet in my heart of hearts I feel your might. 

 

And, so the speaker still loves nature.  In fact, he even adds that his love  for  nature is stronger now than it  was when he was boy. 

  

I love the Brooks which down their channels fret, Even more than when I tripped lightly as they. 

The innocent brightness of a new-born Day Is lovely yet. 

 

72 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth But  the  brightness  of  that  day  is  darkened  by  a heavy  cloud (in line 196).  The cloud symbolizes our own mortality.  It suggests the death of our physical beings.  But even this dark cloud is part of nature.  Even death  is  part of the natural process.   

 

 

The poets adds that … 

 

Another race hath been, and other palms are won. 

 

Other people have lived before us.  Other people have died before us.  It is all part of the progression.  It is all part of nature.  The word palms refers to a branch or wreath made from a palm tree.  Such a branch was traditionally given to the winners of foot races in ancient Greek times.  The palm symbolizes  the  prizes  or  goals  that  all  of  us  aspire  to  or hope to achieve in life.  All of us are after a “palm” of one sort or another.   

 

 

But whether we achieve those goals or not, life goes on.    And  death  comes  for  all  of  us.    One  race  or  people disappear,  and  another  race  takes  its  place.    Such  is  the cycle of life, the cycle of nature. 

 

 

Toward  the  end  of  the  stanza,  the  speaker  gives thanks to nature: 

 

Thanks to the human heart by which we live, Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and fears. 

  

By “human heart” Wordsworth is referring to human nature and human understanding.  Our human nature, our physical or  bodily  presence,  allows  us  to  have  a  greater understanding and appreciation of our spiritual selves. 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 73

 

 

Our  humanity,  our  physical  being,  allows  us  to recognize  and  value  both  nature  and  the  spiritual connection that we have to it.   

 

 

The  child  is  connected  to  the  spiritual  essence,  but does  not  fully  appreciate  it.    But  as  adults,  we  can  more fully  appreciate  the  connection.    And  that  is  why Wordsworth, through his speaker, gives thanks to nature. 

 

 

In  the  last  two  lines  of  the  poem,  the  speaker connects nature to his thoughts regarding the spirit of man. 

 

To me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears. 

 

By  “meanest  flower”  Wordsworth  is  suggesting  that  even the  simplest  or  most  common  object  in  nature  stirs within him deep thoughts.  Those thoughts are the subject matter  of  this  entire  “Ode.”    Those  thoughts  are  about man’s spiritual essence.  And those thoughts are about our own spiritual connection to nature. 

  

 

The  word  intimations  in  the  title  of  this  poem suggests subtle signs or clues.  Wordsworth, in this “Ode,” 

ponders over or wonders about the signs or evidence in our lives  that  indicate  our  spiritual  core,  that  reveal  the  true nature of our beings. 

 

 

In conclusion, in “Ode: Intimations of Immortality,” 

Wordsworth examines memories of his early childhood and the  relationship  of  those  memories  to  adult  life.      The relationship formulates his philosophy of life.  

 

74 

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth According to Wordsworth himself, he was inspired significantly by Platonic philosophy.   The Classical Greek philopher  taught  pre-existence.    Plato  believed  that  the soul existed in a perfect spiritual state before entering a human body.  He further believed that the soul will return to that perfect state after the body's death.  

 

 

Thus,  in  the  title,  “Intimations  of  Immortality,”

Wordsworth declares his focus on the  immortality  of  the soul.  Wordsworth asserts that there are signs or indications in  nature  that  allow  us  to  perceive  and  understand  our spiritual  nature  and  that  prove  to  us  the  existence  of  our immortal souls. 

 

  

Understanding the Poetry of William Wordsworth 75

FINAL COMMENT 

 

 

“Tintern  Abbey”  and  the  “Intimations  Ode”  are only  two  of  Wordsworth’s  many  great  poems.    Readers who appreciate these two poems may also find poems like 

“Michael” or “The Ruined Cottage” to be equally delightful and  enchanting.    There  is  no  shortage  to  the  delight  that Wordsworth has left his readers. 

 

 

After  his  death  in  1850,  another  work  by Wordsworth  appeared  in  print.    This  long  work,  simply entitled  The  Prelude,  is  an  autobiographical  poem  that Wordsworth actually began in the beginning of  his career, back in 1798.  Many critics consider The Prelude to be his magnum  opus,  his  greatest  work,  the  crowning achievement in a brilliant career. 

 

 

In  The  Prelude  Wordsworth  examines  the connection  and  interaction  between  the  mind  and  nature.  

This  connection  is  similar  to  what  appears  in  the 

“Intimations  Ode.”    However,  in  The  Prelude  the  poet develops  the  idea  even  further  and  extends  it  into  a discussion of the creative imagination. 

 

 

Yet,  even  if  The  Prelude  did  not  exist,  literary critics  and  all  lovers  of  poetry  owe  Wordsworth  a  debt  of gratitude  for  his  many  fine  contributions  to  the  art.  

William  Wordsworth  changed  the  direction  of  poetry  and influenced  all  other  poets  who  came  afterwards.    Poetry would not have been the same without him. 

 

 

 

 

THE 

 

POEMS

 

LINES COMPOSED A FEW MILES ABOVE TINTERN 

ABBEY, ON REVISITING THE BANKS OF THE WYE 

DURING A TOUR. JULY 13, 1798 

      [Stanza 1, Lines 1-22] 

 

      FIVE years have past; five summers, with the length Of five long winters! and again I hear These waters, rolling from their mountain-springs With a soft inland murmur.--Once again Do I behold these steep and lofty cliffs, That on a wild secluded scene impress Thoughts of more deep seclusion; and connect The landscape with the quiet of the sky. 

      The day is come when I again repose Here, under this dark sycamore, and view These plots of cottage-ground, these orchard-tufts, Which at this season, with their unripe fruits, Are clad in one green hue, and lose themselves 

      'Mid groves and copses. Once again I see These hedge-rows, hardly hedge-rows, little lines Of sportive wood run wild: these pastoral farms, Green to the very door; and wreaths of smoke Sent up, in silence, from among the trees! 

      With some uncertain notice, as might seem Of vagrant dwellers in the houseless woods, Or of some Hermit's cave, where by his fire The Hermit sits alone. 

80 

Tintern Abbey 

 

      [Stanza 2, Lines 22-49] 

       

                                       These beauteous forms, Through a long absence, have not been to me As is a landscape to a blind man's eye: But oft, in lonely rooms, and 'mid the din Of towns and cities, I have owed to them In hours of weariness, sensations sweet, Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart; And passing even into my purer mind, With tranquil restoration:--feelings too Of unremembered pleasure: such, perhaps, As have no slight or trivial influence On that best portion of a good man's life, His little, nameless, unremembered, acts Of kindness and of love. Nor less, I trust, To them I may have owed another gift, Of aspect more sublime; that blessed mood, In which the burthen of the mystery, In which the heavy and the weary weight Of all this unintelligible world, Is lightened:--that serene and blessed mood, In which the affections gently lead us on,-- 

      Until, the breath of this corporeal frame And even the motion of our human blood Almost suspended, we are laid asleep In body, and become a living soul: While with an eye made quiet by the power Of harmony, and the deep power of joy, We see into the life of things. 

 

       

Tintern Abbey