Help Us Help Others; Click Here

Guide to Federal Agency Resources by White House - HTML preview

PLEASE NOTE: This is an HTML preview only and some elements such as links or page numbers may be incorrect.
Download the book in PDF, ePub, Kindle for a complete version.

index-1_1.jpg

index-1_2.jpg

index-1_3.jpg

index-1_4.jpg

White House Initiative O

n Asian Americans

and Pacific Islanders

Guide to Federal Agency Resources

Promoting a Healthy, Vibrant Asian American

and Pacific Islander Community

First Edition, September 2011

index-2_1.jpg

index-2_2.jpg

index-2_3.jpg

index-2_4.jpg

index-2_5.jpg

index-2_6.jpg

White House Initia

tive On Asian Americans

and Pacific Islanders

Guide to Federal Agency Resources

Promoting a Healthy, Vibrant Asian American

and Pacific Islander Community

First Edition, September 2011

index-3_1.jpg

The White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

Arne Duncan

Co-Chair

Secretary of Education

Christopher Lu

Co-Chair

Assistant to the President and Cabinet Secretary

Gary Locke

U.S. Ambassador to China, former Secretary of Commerce and Co-Chair

Kiran Ahuja

Executive Director

Miya Saika Chen

Senior Advisor and Principal Author

September 2011

This report is in the public domain. Authorization to reproduce it in whole or in part is granted. While permission to reprint this publication is not necessary, the citation should be: White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Guide to Federal Agency Resources, Washington, D.C., 2011.

This guide is available on the White House website at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/aapi.

To order copies of this guide:

write to: ED Pubs, Education Publications Center, P.O. Box 22207, Alexandria, VA 22304;

or fax your request to: 703-605-6794

or email your request to: edpubs@edpubs.ed.gov;

or call in your request toll-free: 1-877-433-7827 (1-877-4-ED-PUBS). Those who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a teletypewriter (TTY), should call 1-877-576-7734. If 877 service is not yet available in your area, call 1-800-872-5327 or 1-800-USA-LEARN

(TTY: 1-800-437-0833);

or order online at: http://www.edpubs.gov.

On request, this publication is available in alternate formats, such as Braille, large print, or computer diskette. For more information, please contact the Department’s Alternate Format Center at 202-260-0852 or 202-260-0818.

Language assistance services:

If you have difficulty understanding English you may request language assistance services. These services are available free of charge. If you need more information about interpretation or translation services, or need to request such services please call 202-453-7277 or write to: White House Initiative on AAPIs, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202.

index-4_1.jpg

contents

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Searching for Federal Assistance and Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Resources by Federal Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

U.S. Department of Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

U.S. Department of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Grantee Spotlight: Foxit Corporation, Fremont, Calif. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

U.S. Department of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Grantee Spotlight: South Seattle Community College AANAPISI Program, Seattle, Wash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

U.S. Department of Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Grantee Spotlight: HOPE Clinic, Houston, Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Grantee Spotlight: MA’O Organic Farms, Wai’anae, Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

U.S. Department of Homeland Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

U.S. Department of the Interior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

U.S. Department of Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Grantee Spotlight: Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence, San Francisco, Calif. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

U.S. Department of Labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Grantee Spotlight: Asian Immigrant Women’s Advocates, Oakland, Calif. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

U.S. Department of Treasury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Grantee Spotlight: Asian Human Services, Chicago, Ill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Additional Federal Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Corporation for National and Community Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Environmental Protection Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Grantee Spotlight: International District Housing Alliance, Seattle, Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Small Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Social Security Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Grantee Spotlight: Pacific American Foundation, Kailua, Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

index-5_1.jpg

introduction

According to the most recent U.S. Census figures, there are over 17 mil-

lion Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) in the United States

today. As one of the most culturally and linguistically diverse groups in

the country, AAPIs trace their heritage to over 30 different countries and

ethnic groups and speak over 100 languages and dialects. From 2000 to

2010, Asian Americans experienced a 43 percent increase and Native

Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders experienced a 30 percent increase in

population.

To help understand what these changing demographics mean for the

“As a small grassroots

federal government, President Obama reauthorized the White House

organization with little experience

Initiative on AAPIs on Oct. 14, 2009, to improve the quality of life of

in applying for federal grants

AAPIs by better connecting them with federally available programs and

protections. Although AAPIs have helped build a strong and vibrant U.S.,

and limited knowledge of the

many still face linguistic isolation, poverty, immigration issues, and other

technical language used in grant

barriers to achieving their full potential.

applications, the process was a

This Guide to Federal Agency Resources is an easy-to-use navigational tool

bit scary at first … My advice for

on federal funding, programs, and resources. It is by no means compre-

those interested in this program is

hensive, but it is meant to provide a brief snapshot of federal resources

to seek out support and guidance

available to assist organizations and individuals seeking to improve the

quality of life of AAPIs. Within this guide, individuals and organizations

from the community and local

can find such information as grant opportunities for nonprofit organiza-

decision makers.”

tions, loan programs to help start a business, federal resources for food

and housing for low-income individuals, and health-care programs for

— EPA Grantee, Seattle, Wash.,

veterans.

September, 2011.

For each federal entity highlighted, the first section provides a short

description of online search engines for federal government grants.

Each subsequent section provides an overview of the federal agency,

selected services and programs that agency offers, and links to additional

resources. This guide also includes 10 Grantee Spotlights, featuring

organizations and individuals who have successfully navigated the federal

grant application process and can offer advice, by example, to prospective

applicants.

Guide to Federal Agency Resources | 2011

1

index-6_1.jpg

searching for federal assistance

and grants

Grants administered by federal agencies differ by eligibility requirements, award

amount, application process, and timing. Two online resources can help you

determine what types of funding are available and how to apply for that funding.

Grants.gov is the primary source of information and mode of submitting applications for federal grants and awards of financial assistance, administered through

1,000 programs and 26 federal grant-making agencies to recipients carrying out

a public purpose of support or stimulation. In FY2009, Grants.gov received over 300,000 application submissions. Users must complete the Grants.gov registration process, which requires organizations to obtain a Data Universal Number

System (DUNS) number and to register with the Central Contractor Registry

(CCR). There is a user guide available, and for general questions, call: 1-800-518-4726 or email support@grants.gov. Note: The registration process takes approximately three to five business days.

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) is a governmentwide compen-

dium of all federal programs available to state and local governments; domestic

public, quasi-public, and private profit and nonprofit organizations and institu-

tions; specialized groups; and individuals. Organizations may utilize the CFDA

to identify programs and information on federal financial and nonfinancial

assistance; however, only government agencies can apply for grants on the CFDA

website directly. There is a user guide available, and individuals may purchase the CFDA by contacting the U.S. Superintendent of Documents at 1-866-512-1800

or the U.S. Government Printing Office’s online bookstore. For assistance using the CFDA website, you may contact the Federal Service Desk or call 1-866-606-8220.

The Federal Register is the official daily publication of the federal government and provides Notices of Funds Available (NOFA). The U.S. Government Printing

Office’s Federal Register database makes it easy to search for updates and informa-

tion on the most recent grant and award opportunities.

2

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

index-7_1.jpg

“Don’t be discouraged and keep on writing. If you are not

successful, try again!”

— DOJ, OVW Grantee, Des Moines, Iowa, September 2011.

Grantee Spotlight: Monsoon United Asian Women of Iowa; Des Moines, Iowa

Federal Program: Culturally and Linguistically Specific Services for Victims

Program; DOJ, OVW

Monsoon was formed in 2003 as a culturally specific advocacy group under the auspices of the Iowa

Coalition Against Sexual Assault. The group aims to provide services to Asian victims and survivors of

domestic violence and sexual assault in Iowa, which include violence prevention, community outreach,

engaging youths to stop violence against women and girls, and providing direct services to survivors and

victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

Executive Director and Cofounder Mira Yusef explains her experience applying for Grants to Enhance

Culturally and Linguistically Specific Services for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual

Assault and Stalking Program (CLSSP), and Sexual Assault Services Program—Grants to Culturally

Specific Programs (SASP-CLSP).

We heard about these grants through two national advocacy organizations, the Asian Pacific Islander

Institute on Domestic Violence and the National Organization of Sisters of Color Ending Sexual As-

sault. With these grants, we were able to hire a full-time Mobile Multilingual Advocate Coordinator,

two part-time Mobile Multilingual Advocates based in satellite locations, a part-time Community Out-

reach Coordinator, two Advocacy Interns and 10-20 on-call Mobile Multilingual Advocates located

throughout Iowa to facilitate a statewide effort. The SASP-CLSP is directed towards victims across

their lifespan, with specific attention to culture and generation. Our “Unburdening Our Mothers Oral

History Project,” is intended to dismantle the shroud of silence hanging over sexual assault among

API elders. To further encourage discourse about sexual assault within younger generations, up to

30 youth peer-to-peer counselors and outreach staff will be hired and trained over three years.

OVW provides valuable technical assistance to prospective grantees throughout the application

process. OVW hosts calls to assist through the process, and the grant manager is also available to

provide assistance if needed. The most difficult part of the application process was obtaining the

DUNS number. I actually enjoyed the process, but I have to say, I may be an aberration!

For those who would like to apply for this grant, I advise you to consult with other organizations for

best practice advice, and shape them to fit your community’s needs. Don’t be discouraged and keep

on writing. If you are not successful, try again!

For more information on OVW programs, visit here.

Guide to Federal Agency Resources | 2011

3

index-8_1.jpg

resources by federal department

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

How it can assist AAPIs

The USDA is a federal agency with a broad range of responsibilities including: serving the hungry, sup-

porting development in rural communities, preserving the environment through conservation programs,

monitoring food safety, and supporting American farmers, ranchers, and consumers.

Food and Nutrition Services programs help one in every five Americans get the nutrition they need. USDA relies on state governments and local organizations to help get food to low-income households. Some of the

most relevant programs to AAPI communities include:

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) helps low-income individuals and families buy the food they need for good health. On the SNAP website you’ll find an Eligibility Pre-Screening Tool, which

can help determine if you may be eligible to receive SNAP benefits, and a Community Partner Outreach

Toolkit, which is full of great resources and how-tos.

The Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program awards grants to states, U.S. territories, and federally recognized Indian tribal governments to provide low-income seniors with coupons that can be exchanged for

certain foods at farmers’ markets, roadside stands, and community-supported agriculture programs.

The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions.

The Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental nutrition program provides federal grants to states for supplemental foods, health care referrals, and nutrition education for low-income pregnant, breastfeeding, and non-breastfeeding postpartum women, and to infants and children up to age 5 who are found to be

at nutritional risk. Currently, about 9 million individuals participate in this nutrition assistance program.

The Farm to School Initiative is an effort to connect schools (K–12) with regional or local farms to serve healthy meals using locally produced foods.

Direct grants for nonprofit organizations and loan

opportunities from agencies within USDA are available.

The 2007 Census of

Eligibility varies, with some available to nonprofit organiza-

Agriculture shows that U.S.

tions and local governments, and others for individuals and

businesses. Organizations can apply directly for grants on

farmers and ranchers are

the Grants.gov website (see more on Grants.gov on page 2).

becoming more diverse and

that the number of Asian

The Community Food Projects Competitive Grant Program

operators grew 40 percent from

(CFP) funds nonprofit organizations to meet the food needs

2002, significantly outpacing

of low-income people by increasing their communities’ ca-

pacities to provide enough food for its residents. To be con-

the 7 percent increase in U.S.

sidered competitive for a CFP grant, organizations should

operators overall.

have experience in community food work, job training, and

business development in low-income communities, and the

application has a dollar-for-dollar matching requirement.

4

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

index-9_1.jpg

Applicants should also demonstrate a willingness to share information with researchers and other practitio-

ners. Projects can be funded from one to three years.

The Risk Management Agency (RMA) Community Outreach and Assistance Partnership Program provides funds to organizations which offer risk management training to limited resource, socially disadvantaged,

traditionally underserved (including women), and beginning farmers and ranchers. RMA staff work closely

with grantees and help to implement the program activities. Funding amounts and educational topics

change annually and new focus areas are announced in the Federal Register.

The Farmers Market Promotion Program grants are designed to increase marketing opportunities for farmers to sell directly to consumers through farmers’ markets, community-supported agriculture (CSA) pro-

grams, retail markets, and other direct marketing initiatives. These grants can go to nonprofits, agricultural cooperatives or producer associations, local governments, economic development corporations, regional

farmers’ market authorities, public benefit corporations, and tribal governments. Visit the website to read the full application requirements, review previously-funded programs, and see two recently released tools

to assist organizations with the grant-writing process: a pre-application guide and a presentation on grant-

writing regarding this program.

The National Organic Program (NOP) regulates the well-known “USDA Organic” label and ensures that customers are buying what is promised with that label. For farmers, NOP regulates what is allowed and not

allowed under the USDA Organic label, as well as provides technical assistance and cost sharing to receive

official organic accreditation. The USDA strategic plan calls for a 25 percent increase in organic production by 2015.

The Rural Development Agency (RD) has various grant and loan programs to help develop housing, com-

munity facilities, and businesses in small towns and rural communities (with exact definition of “rural”

varying depending on program). Organizations can apply directly for grants on the Grants.gov website (see more on Grants.gov on page 2), but there is a wealth of information and technical assistance at state and local RD offices, which should be your first stop. RD administers programs, including Value-Added Producer

Grants, Rural Business Enterprise Grants, Rural Business Opportunity Grants, Rural Cooperative Develop-

ment Grants, and Small Socially-Disadvantaged Producer Grants.

The Natural Resources Conservation Service has a leadership role in developing partnerships to help America’s private landowners conserve their soil, water, and other natural resources. Certain programs also

provide financial assistance for agricultural producers to rehabilitate farmland damaged by natural disasters and pests. For example, the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) Organic Initiative provides technical and financial assistance and equipment to farmers transitioning to organic production. Local

NRCS offices can help create a conservation plan that will preserve farmland, protect natural resources, and reduce soil erosion.

Civil rights protection and enforcement prohibits discrimination against USDA’s customers on the bases of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, familial status, disability, or because all or a part of an individual’s income is derived from a public assistance program. To file a program

discrimination complaint, you may visit the website, call 202-260-1026 or 1-866- 632-9992 (toll-free), send an email to CR-INFO@ascr.usda.gov, or write a letter to: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20250-9410.

Guide to Federal Agency Resources | 2011

5

index-10_1.jpg

Department of Commerce (DOC)

How it can assist AAPIs

The DOC works to improve economic conditions that foster entrepreneurship and innovation within the

U.S. and create global competitiveness and opportunities. DOC has 12 bureaus that administer programs

in areas that include foreign trade, technology, economic development, and environmental stewardship.

DOC services provide economic data about U.S. companies, statistical details about neighborhoods, and

patent and trademark protection for inventors and businesses.

The Minority Business Development

Agency (MBDA) assists minority-

With 1.5 million AAPI-owned businesses in the

owned businesses by providing compa-

nies with tools to access capital, contract

U.S. generating more than $507 billion dollars

opportunities, and business consultants

in sales and employing more than 2.8 million

through its network of nearly 50 minor-

workers, success of AAPI-owned businesses is

ity business centers around the country

critical to the overall economy. Between 2002

that offer local experts who can help

write business plans and marketing

and 2007, the number of U.S. businesses owned

strategies; help locate capital and other

by Asian Americans increased by 40.4 percent, —

funding resources; and provide techni-

more than twice the national rate.

cal assistance and financial planning to

assure sufficient financing for business

ventures. MBDA focuses on firms that

— U.S. Census Bureau, Census Bureau Reports the generate $1 million or more in annual

Number of Asian-Owned Businesses Increased at

revenue. While MBDA will assist any

More Than Twice the National Rate, April 2011.

business seeking help, it often will refer

smaller businesses, especially those start-

ing out, to the Small Business Adminis-

tration (SBA) (for more on the SBA see

page 34).

The Economic Development Administration (EDA) promotes the economic revitalization of distressed communities by providing grant-based investments that attract private capital and create higher-skill,

higher-wage jobs. EDA fosters two key elements through its six regional offices: groundbreaking innovation by entrepreneurs, and regional collaboration between government entities, nonprofit organizations,

education institutions, and Indian tribes. Among EDA’s programs and investment priorities are:

n Economic Adjustment Assistance, EDA’s most flexible program tool, provides funding to communities to develop strategic plans, deliver technical assistance, or establish or recapitalize revolving loan

funds, to address critical economic development needs in the wake of severe disruptions to their

economies.

n The University Center Economic Development program provides strategic investments to help institutions of higher education promote the regional ecosystem and facilitate collaboration among

regional stakeholders to foster economic development

6

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

index-11_1.jpg

The exporting of goods and services has increasingly become a next step for many AAPI entrepreneurs

wanting to expand their businesses. More than 95 percent of the world’s consumers live outside U.S. borders, according to the International Trade Administration, which oversees Export.gov, and provides tools for small business owners on how to enter the exporting industry, including:

n An online assessment to help determine whether a business is ready to pursue international sales.

n A webinar on basic information on exporting, product readiness, market research, and how to best

comply with foreign regulations.

AAPI business owners can get export help and counseling through the Export Assistance Centers available in more than 100 cities. The offices are staffed by trade professionals who provide counseling and services

with an emphasis on small- and mid-sized businesses.

Businesses wanting to protect their inventions, brand names, or symbols identifying their goods and services can do so through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

n Each year, USPTO receives about 350,000 patent applications, most of them for utility patents. For

information on the application process, visit: http://www.uspto.gov/patents/process or call: 1-800-786-9199.

n Trademarks include words, names, symbols, or devices used to identify the goods and services of one

business from those produced or sold by others. The trademark database can be found at http://tess2.

uspto.gov. The application can be filed online at http://www.uspto.gov/teas.

Along with the once-every-decade head-

count, the U.S. Census Bureau conducts

S TAT I S T I C S

more than 100 monthly and annual

The Asian-alone population grew faster than any other

surveys that gather data about housing,

transportation, education, employment,

major race group in the last census: Up 43 percent from

veterans services, public health care,

2000 to 2010. The single-race Native Hawaiian and

rural development, and the environment.

Other Pacific Islander population increased by more

Census data provides everything from

a neighborhood’s average home value,

than one-third between censuses.

commute times, and residential diversity,

to unemployment figures and statistics on

— U.S. Census Bureau, Presentation to the White House Initia-

health insurance coverage, to what foreign

tive on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, May 2011.

languages are spoken at home and in

which cities. Among the more frequently

used Census surveys:

n The annual American Community Survey measures demographic, social, and economic characteristics that help describe the way we live and where we work.

Guide to Federal Agency Resources | 2011

7

index-12_1.jpg

n The Census of Governments provides an overview of the lives of those whose livelihoods are supported by tax dollars—state and local government employees—and the financial state of the entities

they work for.

n The Survey of Income and Program Participation collects data on incomes, employers, health-care costs, and such government programs as food assistance and subsidized housing.

n The Survey of Business Owners gathers data on the gender, ethnicity, race, and veteran status of the people running businesses in the United States.

Grantee Spotlight: Foxit Corporation, Fremont, Calif.

Federal Program: Minority Business Development Administration; DOC

With a limited command of English and even less understanding of U.S. small business financing,

Eugene Y. Xiong came to the U.S. in 1994 from China and set out to achieve the American dream. The

Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) assisted Xiong’s Foxit Corporation in becoming a multi-

million-dollar company, which produces an alternative to Adobe for PDF users, with customers including

Microsoft, Intel and Hewlett Packard. Mr. Xiong never heard of MBDA before his banker referred him

to the MBDA’s San Jose Business Center after failed attempts to obtain loans and other financing. He

recalls the first question he asked MBDA: How much will this cost me? The answer: Nothing. Mr. Xiong

remembers the assistance he received from MBDA to grow his successful business.

When we were tight on cash flow, MBDA helped us find the right banking service, and we got the

right cash that we needed to grow our business. They have been constantly in contact with us and

provide consulting and referral services. We also received information about the government pro-

curement process.

I didn’t know there were government services like this. I wish I had learned about this earlier. This is the kind of service that people need to know about. My advice to small, minority-owned businesses,

like my own, is this: Do not hesitate in seeing what resources the government can offer you.

More about MBDA and its services can be found at http://www.mbda.gov.

Department of Education (ED)

How it can assist AAPIs

ED establishes and executes the president’s education policy, implements laws enacted by Congress, and

administers and coordinates federal assistance to education. ED’s elementary and secondary programs an-

nually serve more than 14,000 school districts and approximately 56 million students attending some 97,000

schools and 28,000 private schools. Its programs also provide grant, loan, and work-study assistance to ap-

proximately 11 million postsecondary students.

The Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE) administers all programs for the country’s elementary and secondary schools. Below are programs relevant to students and community organizations.

n 21st Century Community Learning Centers provide academic enrichment opportunities during nonschool hours for children, particularly students who attend high-poverty and low-performing

8

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

index-13_1.jpg

schools. Formula grants are provided to state education agencies (SEAs) and are sub-granted to local

education agencies (LEAs), nonprofit organizations, or other public or private entities.

n The Native Hawaiian Education Program promotes innovative programs and supplemental education services (including early education, literacy, and postsecondary programs) for Native Hawaiians.

Nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply directly.

n The Education for Homeless Children and Youth Grants for state and local activities gather comprehensive information about homeless children and youths and provides grants to SEAs to ensure that

homeless children have equal access to free and appropriate public education.

n The Teacher Incentive Fund supports development of performance-based teacher and principal compensation systems in high-need schools. SEAs, LEAs, and nonprofit organizations may apply.

n The Race to the Top awards SEAs that are leading the way with ambitious yet achievable plans for implementing coherent, compelling, and comprehensive education reform.

The Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) administers over 60 programs that increase access to quality postsecondary education.

n The Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions program and the Asian American and

Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISI) program helps eligible institutions of higher education (IHEs) increase their self-sufficiency and expand their capacity to serve

low-income students by providing funds to improve and strengthen the academic quality, institu-

tional management, and fiscal stability of eligible IHEs.

n The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) supports innovative projects, reforms, and improvements in U.S. postsecondary education. Nonprofit organizations are eligible to

apply directly.

n The College Access Challenge Grant Program helps low-income students succeed in postsecondary education by funding SEA programs to: provide information to students and families regarding

postsecondary education and career preparation; promote financial literacy and debt management;

conduct outreach activities; and other activities.

n Federal TRIO Programs include eight programs at IHEs and community organizations targeted to serve low-income individuals, first-generation college students, and individuals with disabilities to

progress from middle school to postbaccalaureate programs. Programs include Talent Search, Up-

ward Bound, and Student Support Services.

Federal Student Aid (FSA) administers grants, loans, and work-study assistance to postsecondary students. Students interested in any of these programs must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

n The Federal Pell Grant Program provides need-based grants to low-income undergraduate and certain post baccalaureate students to promote access to postsecondary education.

n Other Federal Student Aid grants including the Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher

Education Grants (TEACH) can be found here.

n The Federal Direct Student Loan Program provides loans directly to students for undergraduate and graduate studies, through participating postsecondary schools, with funds borrowed from the

Guide to Federal Agency Resources | 2011

9

index-14_1.jpg

U.S. Treasury. Direct Loans include subsidized and unsubsidized loans, PLUS loans for parents and

graduate or professional degree students, and consolidation loans, which allow borrowers to combine

federal education loan debt.

n Federal Work-Study programs provide part-time employment for students while they are enrolled in school. Students are paid directly for their work and schools are responsible for administering the

program.

n The Stafford Loan Forgiveness Program for Teachers forgives up to a combined total of $17,500 in principal and interest on loans by individuals who teach full-time for five consecutive, complete

academic years in certain elementary and secondary schools that serve low-income families. Students

may also be eligible to defer or cancel loans.

The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) ensures equal access to education and promotes educational excellence through vigorous enforcement of civil rights. OCR serves students facing discrimination and the advocates

and institutions promoting systemic solutions to civil rights problems. To file a complaint: You may contact an OCR enforcement office, call 1-800-421-3481, or use the online complaint form.

n ED, along with the departments of Defense, Justice, Health and Human Services, Agriculture, and the

Interior form the Obama Administrations Inter-Agency Task Force on Bullying and launched both

the Stop Bul ying Now Campaign and http://www.bullyinginfo.org, a national database of effective anti-bullying programs.

Grantee Spotlight: South Seattle Community College; Seattle, Wash.

Federal Program: Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander Serving

Institution (AANAPISI); ED

South Seattle Community College (South) is located in a diverse residential neighborhood in southwest

Seattle. It is the lowest income area in the Pacific Northwest. AAPIs comprise the largest group of color

on campus at 23 percent of the student population. However, less than 3 percent of the surrounding

AAPI community is enrolled, with most students coming from other parts of the country.

In 2008, South’s vice president of Student Services read about the AANAPISI program in a local news-

paper. Subsequently, with the help of a Community Advisory Committee formed by South’s president and

an institutional development consultant, they submitted a successful application and became one of the

first six recipients in the country to receive the AANAPISI designation and funding.

South’s AANAPISI grant focused on breaking down the barriers to access, retention, and success of

AAPI students. Strategies included the development of culturally relevant programs that acknowledge

the importance of family; engaging students through pedagogically sensitive learning communities; pro-

viding role models and mentoring; providing resources to transition to college level course work, offering

two new degree options, and the development of a virtual website of promising practices and resources

to support the success of AAPIs in higher education.

For institutions of higher education interested in the AANAPISI program, South recommends finding a

strong internal champion and enlisting a campus coordinator to pull together a team and information to de-

velop the grant. Institutions should also get input from their AAPI community and work to debunk the Model

Minority Myth. To learn more about South’s AANAPISI program, visit http://www.aapiherc.southseattle.edu/.

10

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

index-15_1.jpg

Department of Energy (DOE)

How it can assist AAPIs

DOE advances science and technology in disciplines relevant to energy, the environment, and security.

DOE supports a wide range of basic and applied scientific research. For example, through the Office of

Science, DOE offers research grants and contracts for universities, nonprofit organizations, for-profit commercial organizations, state and local governments, and unaffiliated individuals. The Advanced Research

Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) provides funding opportunities for the research and development of high-risk and high-reward advanced energy technologies. DOE also supports Science, Technology, Engi-

neering, and Mathematics (STEM) education to recruit new K–12 teachers, enhance existing STEM teacher knowledge and skills, and provide greater STEM education for students.

Energy efficiency: DOE works with state governments to fund a network of community action agencies, nonprofit organizations, and local governments to provide weatherization information and services,

including weatherization of low-income homes. Consumers can get tax credits for home energy efficiency improvements, residential renewable energy, and automobiles. DOE provides homeowners with energy saving tips in the Energy Savers booklet.

Loans and grants are available for small business innovation, training program development, energy efficient technology, lighting, and advanced energy manufacturing for industrial, commercial and residential

energy efficiency purposes. Rebates and tax credits are also offered for energy-efficient businesses using

renewable energy. The Loan Programs Office guarantees loans for eligible clean energy projects and provides direct loans to eligible manufacturers of advanced technology vehicles and components.

The Office of Procurement and Assistance Management (OPAM) oversees policies and procedures for all DOE contracting, financial assistance, and business-related activities. OPAM’s website offers a thorough compendium of links to information on doing business with DOE. Small businesses seeking grants can participate in the Office of Science’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBTT) Program. The Office of Economic Impact and Diversity works with minority-owned and other small businesses to advance DOE’s mission.

Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

How it can assist AAPIs

HHS is the principal agency for protecting the health of all individuals and providing essential human

services. HHS administers more funding opportunities than all other federal agencies combined, with 400

grant programs across 18 agencies. Many HHS-funded programs are provided or administered at the local

level by state or county agencies in conjunction with community organizations and the private sector.

HHS is responsible for implementing many components of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), signed into law on March 23, 2010, which gives Americans greater access and control in their health-care choices.

Guide to Federal Agency Resources | 2011

11

index-16_1.jpg

The passage of the ACA enhances HHS’ charge to reduce health disparities through the development of offices of Minority Health in six agencies within HHS. The HHS Action Plan to Reduce Health Disparities and the National Stakeholder Strat-

egy for Achieving Health Equity outline goals and actions, as well as public and private sector initiatives, to reduce health disparities among racial and ethnic minorities.

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) works in partnership with communities and organizations in the public and private sectors to improve

the health of racial and ethnic minority populations through develop-

AAPI women between the ages of

ment of health policies and programs that will help eliminate health dis-

15-24 have the highest rates of suicide

parities. OMH programs address disease prevention, health promotion,

among women in that age group, and

risk reduction, healthier lifestyle choices, use of health-care services,

and barriers to health care. OMH also administers grant programs to

AAPI women over 65 have the highest

support community organizations and science-based efforts to eliminate

rates of suicide among all races in that

health disparities. Call 1-800-444-6472 for more information.

age.

The National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities

advises the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the development of

— HHS, Office of Minority Health, Health

NIH-wide policy issues related to minority and other health disparities

Status of Asian American and Pacific

research, develops a comprehensive strategic plan governing the con-

Islander Women, April 2007.

duct and support of this research, and administers funds through grants

and through leveraging the programs of the NIH.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration works to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness. SAMHSA’s National Network to Eliminate Disparities in Behavioral Health, provides grants to build a national network of diverse racial, ethnic, cultural, and sexual minority communities and organizations to promote policies, practices, standards, and research to eliminate behavioral health disparities.

The following agencies within HHS work on the delivery of

health care services.

In 2009, HRSA health centers served

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), com-

roughly 19 million Americans, including

prised of six bureaus and 13 offices, is the primary federal agency

for improving access to health-care services for people who are

nearly 500,000 Asian Americans. Nearly

uninsured, isolated, or medically vulnerable. The Bureau of Pri-

two-thirds of Asian Americans served by

mary Health Care (BPHC) funds health centers in underserved

these health centers had limited English

communities that provide access to high-quality, family-oriented,

and comprehensive primary and preventive health care for people

proficiency

who are low-income, uninsured, or face other obstacles to getting

health care. For funding opportunities, visit http://www.hrsa.gov/

— HHS, Health Resources and Services Ad-

grants, and for locating local health centers, visit findahealthcen-

ministration, May 2011.

ter.hrsa.gov.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) admin-

isters: Medicare, a health insurance program for people age 65 or

older; people under age 65 with certain disabilities; and people of all ages with end-stage renal disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant); Medicaid, a state-administered program and available only to certain low-income individuals and families who fit into an eligibility group that is recognized by federal and state law; and the

Children’s Health Insurance Programs (CHIP), a state and federal partnership that targets uninsured children and pregnant women in families with incomes too high to qualify for most state Medicaid programs, but often too low to afford private coverage. The Center for Consumer Information & Insurance Oversight, within CMS, oversees the implementation of the provisions of the ACA related to private health insurance.

12

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

index-17_1.jpg

The following agencies within HHS work on prevention measures

to protect the public health.

Cancer is the leading cause of death

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protects the

for Asian Americans and Pacific

public health of the nation by providing leadership and direction in

Islanders.

the prevention and control of diseases and other preventable condi-

tions and responding to public health emergencies.

— HHS, C

enters for Disease Control,

Leading Causes of Death by Race/

The Division of Viral Hepatitis provides the scientific and program-

Ethnicity (pdf), 2009, Table 28.

matic foundation for the prevention, control, and elimination of hepa-

titis virus infections in the United States, and assists the international

public health community in these activities.

The

Division of Diabetes Translation translates diabetes research into daily practice to better understand the impact of the disease, influence health outcomes, and improve access to quality health care. The National

Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is a joint effort of CDC and NIH and involves public and private partners in efforts to improve diabetes management and outcomes, promote early diagnoses, and prevent or

delay the onset of diabetes in the U.S. and its territories. NDEP resources in AAPI languages are available on its website.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ensures that human and animal drugs, biological products, and medical devices are safe and effective and that electronic products that emit radiation are safe.

The following agencies within HHS work on human services.

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) promotes the economic and social well-being of America’s most vulnerable populations and communities. ACF’s programs (ACF Directory of Program

Services) are focused on individuals and families with low income, refugees, people with developmental disabilities, and others.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement oversees and provides guidance to state-administered programs that provide assistance and services to refugee, asylees, certain Amerasian immigrants, Cuban and Haitian en-trants, as well as victims of human trafficking.

The Office of Family Assistance administers Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs,

time-limited assistance to needy families with children to promote work, responsibility, and self-sufficiency.

The Office of Head Start provides grants to local public and private nonprofits and for-profit agencies to provide comprehensive child development services to economically disadvantaged children and families, and

has a special focus on helping preschoolers develop early reading and math skills.

The Child Care and Development Fund provides funding for states to improve the quality of child care and to provide child care assistance for so they can work or attend training or obtain other education. Each state has its own eligibility guidelines. You may apply for child care assistance at a state or local agency.

The Family and Youth Services Bureau provides a number of programs addressing youth and family issues, including programs for runaway and homeless youths, teen pregnancy prevention, and family violence prevention and services. Additional y, the FYSB administers funding from the Family Violence Prevention and

Services Act, the primary federal funding stream dedicated to the support of emergency shelter and related assistance for victims of domestic violence and their dependents. The National Clearinghouse on Families

& Youth is an information resource that assists current and prospective FYSB grantees, and anyone else who Guide to Federal Agency Resources | 2011

13

index-18_1.jpg

works with at-risk youths and families, to realize their goals, better serve their communities, and improve

the lives of young people and their families.

The Office of Community Services provides a range of human and economic development services and activities, intended to ameliorate the causes and characteristics of poverty and otherwise assist persons in need

including. Programs include the Community Economic Development Program, the Job Opportunities for

Low-Income Individuals, and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program.

The Administration on Aging (AoA) is the primary agency designated to carry out the provisions of the Older Americans Act of 1965. Programs and services that are administered include: home-delivered meals and other nutrition-related services, transportation, adult day care, legal assistance, and health promotion.

AoA’s National Family Caregiver Support Program provides grants to states and territories, based on their share of the population aged 70 and over, to fund a range of supports that assist family and informal caregiv-ers to care for their loved ones at home for as long as possible.

Other Resources:

n The Health Finder website and OMH website provide documents created by HHS program offices, printed in English and other Asian and Pacific Island languages. For additional language assistance,

contact an information specialist at the OMH Resource Center at: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov or

1-800-444-6472.

n Information about the HHS grant processes is available here.

n The HHS Grants Forecast provides individuals with advanced notice of upcoming funding opportunities.

Grantee Spotlight: HOPE Clinic; Houston, Texas

Federal Program: Health Center Program; HHS, HRSA

Since 2002, HOPE Clinic, a community health center, has provided comprehensive primary health-care

services in a culturally and linguistically related manner to underserved Asian Americans in the Greater

Houston, Texas, area, including more than 3,000 Vietnamese American evacuees during Hurricane

Katrina. Chief Executive Director Dr. Andrea Caracostis discusses her experience applying for HRSA

planning grants and HOPE Clinic’s designation to become a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC)

Look-Alike, which makes it eligible for funding opportunities through HHS.

Establishing a community health center was the vision of a group of Asian American women who

established the Asian American Health Coalition (AAHC) in Houston in 1994. AAHC collaborated

with another community organization, the Chinese Community Center, to establish HOPE as an

all-volunteer part-time health clinic in 2002. HOPE then successfully applied for and received two

HRSA planning grants and was designated as a Federally Qualified Health Center Look-Alike.

We used the health center planning grants to conduct a comprehensive community needs assess-

ment, which is a critical component in health center development, in order to fully understand our

community’s needs to determine meaningful impact. The planning grants were also used to gather

essential data and develop detailed business and clinic plans.

HOPE worked on our Look-Alike application for approximately one year before receiving the desig-

nation (it actually took three denied applications). Proposal writing was a one-woman operation! The

14

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

index-19_1.jpg

key to the success of the application is about knowing your community and accurately describing your entire population and area; not focusing so much on one specific population or group.

As for technical assistance, our staff took initiative and researched HRSA guidelines. We worked with organizational partners, including the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO) and the local Primary Care Association, which provided valuable technical assistance, data, assistance with development of clinic policy and procedures, and provision of operational resources.

My advice to other organizations interested in this program is to take advantage of partnerships, collaborations and outreach, and engage with your community. Use your grant application as your business plan and a check list for your organization. Remember to document and collect baseline data in order to show change and carefully measure your progress to prove success.

For more information on the Health Center Program, visit: http://bphc.hrsa.gov .

Grantee Spotlight: MAÒ Organic Farms; Waiànae, Hawaii

Federal Program: Social and Economic Development Strategies for Native Americans (SEDS)

Federal Grant; HHS

MAÒ Organic Farms is a fully certified 24-acre organic farm on the highly urbanized island of Oàhu. MAÒ offers a variety of community and education programs for youths and adults primarily based on the Waiànae coast and/or on-site at the farm.

MAÒ programs all relate to MAÒ’s mission of land-based community development through growing organic food and supporting youth leaders. Executive Director Kukui Maunakea-Forth explains her experience applying for the SEDS federal grant.

The grant is well-known because the program has a strong history in the Waiànae community. The goal of the grant is to assist Native communities to achieve the goal of economic and social self-sufficiency. MAÒ used the SEDS grant for both economic and social development. The funding helped grow MAÒ’s youth programs, which develop new young farmers as well as youth leaders equipped to create a regional organic food system in Hawaiì, where food security is a challenge. By developing young farmers and leaders, we ensure that a new generation of people will have jobs and produce food for our community.

We applied for the grant as a start-up, and our primary challenge was developing the organizational capacity to create and submit a competitive proposal. The process was facilitated by HHS’ relationship with the community. Though the process was challenging, the experience was rewarding. HHS contracted consultants, who provided technical assistance to the SEDS grant applicants. Local intermediary agencies provided critical input to the process. For instance, one of the agencies, Hawaii Alliance of Community Based Economic Development supports community-based economic development by being a facilitator, catalyst, broker, and producer of training, technical assistance, advocacy, education, and research and development products and services.

My advice for those interested in this program, simply put, is to go for it! In our opinion, the community-centered SEDS

grant is one of the most supportive federal grants available. Though many other grants exist, the SEDS grant has fewer levels of the embedded bureaucracy that makes it daunting for smaller, community-oriented projects to administer. At best, you will be successful in obtaining this grant. At worst, you will have gained a valuable learning experience from navigating the process.

For more information on the SEDS grant, visit http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ana.

Guide to Federal Agency Resources | 2011

15

index-20_1.jpg

Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

How it can assist AAPIs

DHS was formed in 2003 and works to build a safe and secure homeland by focusing on the following mis-

sion areas: preventing terrorism, securing our borders; enforcing our immigration laws; securing cyber-

space; and ensuring resilience to disasters.

U.S. Citizenship And Immigration Services (USCIS) oversees the lawful immigration of individuals to the U.S. and processes such immigration paperwork as petitions for lawful permanent residence (green card applications); citizenship; student, employment, and humanitarian visas; international adoptions; asylum; and

other immigration benefits. USCIS services include, immigration forms; Immigration Information Officer appointments at InfoPass, available in English, Vietnamese, Chinese, Tagalog, Korean, and other languages;

case status; citizenship applications; Green Card (Permanent Residence) applications; helping family mem-

bers immigrate to the U.S.; asylum applications; and work authorization applications.

n USCIS Ombudsman provides recommendations for resolving individual and employer issues with

USCIS. If you are experiencing problems during the adjudication of an immigration benefit with

USCIS you can submit a case problem to the CIS Ombudsman using DHS Form 7001.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is responsible for securing America’s borders to protect against threats and prevent the illegal entry of inadmissible persons and contraband, while facilitating lawful travel, trade, and immigration. Each day, CBP welcomes more than 1.1 million international travelers into the U.S.

at land, air, and seaports. CBP provides information on traveling to the U.S., including information on the CBP inspection process, traveler entry forms, prohibited items, and other restrictions and policies.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is responsible for safeguarding homeland security

and public safety through the enforcement of federal laws governing border control, customs, trade, and

immigration. In addition, ICE Public Engagement seeks to build constructive relationships with community

stakeholders through targeted community outreach across the country. The ICE Online Detainee Locator

System may be used to locate a detainee who is currently in ICE custody, or who was released from ICE

custody within the last 60 days.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is charged with protecting passengers’ privacy and

facilitating the flow of legitimate commerce. Approximately 48,000 Transportation Security Officers serve in over 450 U.S. airports, where they screen approximately 2 million people a day. TSA’s Office of Civil Rights

and Liberties reviews concerns about a screening experience where an individual believes he or she was treated differently or discriminated against to ensure that the public are treated in a fair and lawful manner.

For information regarding a violation of civil rights or civil liberties while traveling, email TSAExternal-

Compliance@dhs.gov, call 1-866-289-9673, or file a civil rights/civil liberties complaint.

The Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) supports the nation’s state, local, tribal,

territorial, and private partners and first responders. It also improves our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards and natural disasters. Families and individuals that have been impacted by a disaster and need assistance have several options for getting help: look up

disaster assistance grants and programs, register online or through a web-enabled mobile device, or call 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or 1-800-462-7585 (TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired.

16

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

index-21_1.jpg

The Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL) advises DHS on ways to promote respect for civil rights and civil liberties in policy creation and implementation; communicates with individuals and communities whose civil rights and civil liberties may be affected by DHS activities, and informs them about

policies and avenues of redress. CRCL investigates and resolves civil rights and civil liberties complaints filed by the public regarding DHS policies or activities, or actions taken by DHS personnel, including:

discrimination based on race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, gender, or disability; violation of rights while in immigration detention or as a subject of immigration enforcement; discrimination or inappropriate questioning related to entry into the U.S.; or physical abuse or any other type of abuse. Complaint forms

can be submitted via mail, email (crcl@dhs.gov), or telephone (1-866-644-8360). Complaints are accepted in languages other than English and may be filed by members of the public, federal agencies or agency personnel, non-governmental organizations, media reports and other sources.