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Zanoni

"If happiness exist," answered Mejnour, "it must be centred in a SELF to which all
passion is unknown. But happiness is the last state of being; and as yet thou art on the
threshold of the first."
As Mejnour spoke, the distant vessel spread its sails to the wind, and moved slowly along
the deep. Glyndon sighed, and the pupil and the master retraced their steps towards the
city.
Book IV. The Dweller Of The Threshold
Bey hinter ihm was will! Ich heb ihn auf.
"Das Verschleierte Bildzu Sais"
(Be behind what there may, - I raise the veil.)
Chapter IV.1
Come vittima io vengo all' ara.
"Metast.," At. ii. Sc. 7.
(As a victim I go to the altar.)
It was about a month after the date of Zanoni's departure and Glyndon's introduction to
Mejnour, when two Englishmen were walking, arm-in-arm, through the Toledo.
"I tell you," said one (who spoke warmly), "that if you have a particle of common-sense
left in you, you will accompany me to England. This Mejnour is an imposter more
dangerous, because more in earnest, than Zanoni. After all, what do his promises amount
to? You allow that nothing can be more equivocal. You say that he has left Naples,--that
he has selected a retreat more congenial than the crowded thoroughfares of men to the
studies in which he is to initiate you; and this retreat is among the haunts of the fiercest
bandits of Italy,--haunts which justice itself dares not penetrate. Fitting hermitage for a
sage! I tremble for you. What if this stranger--of whom nothing is known--be leagued
with the robbers; and these lures for your credulity bait but the traps for your property,--
perhaps your life? You might come off cheaply by a ransom of half your fortune. You
smile indignantly! Well, put common-sense out of the question; take your own view of
the matter. You are to undergo an ordeal which Mejnour himself does not profess to
describe as a very tempting one. It may, or it may not, succeed: if it does not, you are
menaced with the darkest evils; and if it does, you cannot be better off than the dull and
joyless mystic whom you have taken for a master. Away with this folly; enjoy youth
while it is left to you; return with me to England; forget these dreams; enter your proper
career; form affections more respectable than those which lured you awhile to an Italian
 
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