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as rehearsing ancestral activities–The glory of Greek physical
training, its ideals and results–The first spontaneous movements of
infancy as keys to the past–Necessity of developing basal powers
before those that are later and peculiar to the individual–Plays that
interest due to their antiquity–Play with dolls–Play distinguished
by age–Play preferences of children and their reas ons–The profound
significance of rhythm–The value of dancing and also its
significance, history, and the desirability of reintroducing
it–Fighting–Boxing–Wrestling–B ushido–Foot-ball–Military
ideals–S howing o–Cold baths–Hill climbing–The playground
movement–The psychology of play–Its relation to work
VII.–FAULTS, LIES, AND CRIMES.
Classification of children’s faults–Peculiar children–Real fault as
distinguished from interference with the teacher’s ease–Truancy, its
nature and eects–The genesis of crime–The lie, its classes and
relations to imagination–Predatory activities–Gangs–Causes of
crime–The eects of stories of crime–Temibility–Juvenile crime and
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its treatment
VIII.–B IOGRAP HIES OF YOUTH.
Knightly ideals and honor–Thirty adolescents from
Shakespeare–Goethe–C.D. Warner–Aldric h–The fugitive nat ure of
adolescent experience–Extravagance of autobiographies–Stories that
attach to great names–S ome typical crazes–Illustrations from George
Eliot, Edison, Chatterton, Hawthorne, Whittier, Spencer, Huxley,
Lyell, Byron, Heine, Napoleon, Darwin, Martineau, Agassiz, Madame
Roland, Louisa Alcott, F.H. Burnett, Helen Keller, Marie Bashkirtse,
Mary MacLane, Ada Negri, De Quincey, Stuart Mill, Jeeries, and
scores of others
IX.–THE GROWTH OF SOCIA L IDEALS.
Change from childish to adult friends–Influence of favorite
teachers–What children wis h or plan to do or be–Property and the
money sense–Social judgments–The only child–First social
organizations–Student life–Associations for youth controlled by
adults
X.–INTE LLE CTUAL EDUCA TION AND SCHOOL WORK.
The general change and plasticity at puberty–English teaching–Causes
of its failure, (1) too muc h time to other languages, (2)
subordination of literary content to form, (3) too early stress on eye
and hand instead of ear and mouth, (4) excessive use of concrete
words–Children’s interest in words–Their favorites–Slang–Story
telling–A ge of reading crazes–What to read–The historic
sense–Growth of memory span
XI.–THE EDUCA TION OF GIRLS.
Equal opportunities of higher education now open–B rings new dangers
to women–Ineradicable sex dierences begin at puberty, when the
sexes should and do di verge–Dierent interests–Sex tension–Girls
more mature than boys at the same age–Radical psychic and
physiological dierences bet ween the sexes–The bachelor women–Needed
reconstruction–Food–Sleep–Regimen–Manners–Religion–Regularity–
The topics for a girls’ curriculum–The eternally womanly
XII.–MORAL AND RELIGIOUS TRAINING.
Dangers of muscular degeneration and overstimulus of
brain–Diculties in teaching morals–Met hods in Europe–Obedience
to commands–Good habits should be mechanized–Value of scolding–How
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