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Wuthering Heights

Chapter 30
I HAVE paid a visit to the Heights, but I have not seen her since she left: Joseph held the
door in his hand when I called to ask after her, and wouldn't let me pass. He said Mrs.
Linton was "thrang," and the master was not in. Zillah has told me something of the way
they go on, otherwise I should hardly know who was dead and who living.
She thinks Catherine haughty, and does not like her, I can guess by her talk. My young
lady asked some aid of her when she first came; but Mr. Heathcliff told her to follow her
own business, and let his daughter-in-law look after herself; and Zillah willingly
acquiesced, being a narrow-minded, selfish woman. Catherine evinced a child's
annoyance at this neglect; repaid it with contempt, and thus enlisted my informant among
her enemies, as securely as if she had done her some great wrong. I had a long talk with
Zillah about six weeks ago, a little before you came, one day when we foregathered on
the moor; and this is what she told me.
"The first thing Mrs. Linton did," she said, "on her arrival at the Heights, was to run
upstairs, without even wishing good evening to me and Joseph; she shut herself into
Linton's room, and remained till morning. Then, while the master and Earnshaw were at
breakfast, she entered the house, and asked all in a quiver if the doctor might be sent for?
her cousin was very ill.
"'We know that!' answered Heathcliff; 'but his life is not worth a farthing, and I won't
spend a farthing on him.'
"'But I cannot tell how to do,' she said; 'and if no body will help me, he'll die!'
"'Walk out of the room,' cried the master, 'and let me never hear a word more about him!
None here care what becomes of him; if you do, act the nurse; if you do not, lock him up
and leave him.'
"Then she began to bother me, and I said I'd had enough plague with the tiresome thing;
we each had our tasks, and hers was to wait on Linton, Mr. Heathcliff bid me leave that
labour to her.
"How they managed together, I can't tell. I fancy he fretted a great deal, and moaned
hisseln night and day; and she had precious little rest: one could guess by her white face
and heavy eyes. She sometimes came into the kitchen all wildered like, and looked as if
she would fain beg assistance; but I was not going to disobey the master: I never dare
disobey him, Mrs. Dean; and, though I thought it wrong that Kenneth should not be sent
for, it was no concern of mine either to advise or complain, and I always refused to
meddle.
 
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