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White Fang

The Outcast
Lip-lip continued so to darken his days that White Fang became wickeder and more
ferocious than it was his natural right to be. Savageness was a part of his make-up, but
the savageness thus developed exceeded his make-up. He acquired a reputation for
wickedness amongst the man-animals themselves. Wherever there was trouble and uproar
in camp, fighting and squabbling or the outcry of a squaw over a bit of stolen meat, they
were sure to find White Fang mixed up in it and usually at the bottom of it. They did not
bother to look after the causes of his conduct. They saw only the effects, and the effects
were bad. He was a sneak and a thief, a mischief-maker, a fomenter of trouble; and irate
squaws told him to his face, the while he eyed them alert and ready to dodge any quick-
flung missile, that he was a wolf and worthless and bound to come to an evil end.
He found himself an outcast in the midst of the populous camp. All the young dogs
followed Lip-lip's lead. There was a difference between White Fang and them. Perhaps
they sensed his wild-wood breed, and instinctively felt for him the enmity that the
domestic dog feels for the wolf. But be that as it may, they joined with Lip-lip in the
persecution. And, once declared against him, they found good reason to continue
declared against him. One and all, from time to time, they felt his teeth; and to his credit,
he gave more than he received. Many of them he could whip in single fight; but single
fight was denied him. The beginning of such a fight was a signal for all the young dogs in
camp to come running and pitch upon him.
Out of this pack-persecution he learned two important things: how to take care of himself
in a mass-fight against him - and how, on a single dog, to inflict the greatest amount of
damage in the briefest space of time. To keep one's feet in the midst of the hostile mass
meant life, and this he learnt well. He became cat-like in his ability to stay on his feet.
Even grown dogs might hurtle him backward or sideways with the impact of their heavy
bodies; and backward or sideways he would go, in the air or sliding on the ground, but
always with his legs under him and his feet downward to the mother earth.
When dogs fight, there are usually preliminaries to the actual combat - snarlings and
bristlings and stiff-legged struttings. But White Fang learned to omit these preliminaries.
Delay meant the coming against him of all the young dogs. He must do his work quickly
and get away. So he learnt to give no warning of his intention. He rushed in and snapped
and slashed on the instant, without notice, before his foe could prepare to meet him. Thus
he learned how to inflict quick and severe damage. Also he learned the value of surprise.
A dog, taken off its guard, its shoulder slashed open or its ear ripped in ribbons before it
knew what was happening, was a dog half whipped.
Furthermore, it was remarkably easy to overthrow a dog taken by surprise; while a dog,
thus overthrown, invariably exposed for a moment the soft underside of its neck - the
vulnerable point at which to strike for its life. White Fang knew this point. It was a
knowledge bequeathed to him directly from the hunting generation of wolves. So it was
that White Fang's method when he took the offensive, was: first to find a young dog
 
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