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Waverley

Chapter 14
A Discovery--Waverley Becomes Domesticated At Tully-Veolan
The next day Edward arose betimes, and in a morning walk around the house and its
vicinity, came suddenly upon a small court in front of the dog-kennel, where his friend
Davie was employed about his four-footed charge. One quick glance of his eye
recognized Waverley, when, instantly turning his back, as if he had not observed him, he
began to sing part of an old ballad:--
Young men will love thee more fair and more fast;
HEARD YE SO MERRY THE LITTLE BIRD SING?
Old men's love the longest will last,
AND THE THROSTLE-COCK'S HEAD IS UNDER HIS WING.
The young man's wrath is like light straw on fire;
HEARD YE SO MERRY THE LITTLE BIRD SING?
But like red-hot steel is the old man's ire,
AND THE THROSTLE-COCK'S HEAD IS UNDER HIS WING.
The young man will brawl at the evening board;
HEARD YE SO MERRY THE LITTLE BIRD SING?
But the old man will draw at the dawning the sword,
AND THE THROSTLE-COCK'S HEAD IS UNDER HIS WING.
Waverley could not avoid observing that Davie laid something like a satirical emphasis
on these lines. He therefore approached, and endeavoured, by sundry queries, to elicit
from him what the innuendo might mean; but Davie had no mind to explain, and had wit
enough to make his folly cloak his knavery. Edward could collect nothing from him,
excepting that the Laird of Balmawhapple had gone home yesterday morning, 'wi' his
boots fu' o' bluid.' In the garden, however, he met the old butler, who no longer attempted
to conceal, that, having been bred in the nursery line with Sumack & Co., of Newcastle,
he sometimes wrought a turn in the flower-borders to oblige the Laird and Miss Rose. By
a series of queries, Edward at length discovered, with a painful feeling of surprise and
shame, that Balmawhapple's submission and apology had been the consequence of a
rencontre with the Baron before his guest had quitted his pillow, in which the younger
combatant had been disarmed and wounded in the sword- arm.
Greatly mortified at this information, Edward sought out his friendly host, and anxiously
expostulated with him upon the injustice he had done him in anticipating his meeting
with Mr. Falconer, a circumstance which, considering his youth and the profession of
arms which he had just adopted, was capable of being represented much to his prejudice.
The Baron justified himself at greater length than I choose to repeat. He urged that the
quarrel was common to them, and that Balmawhapple could not, by the code of honour,
 
 
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