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The vindication of the rights of women

WITH A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF THE AUTHOR.
CONTENTS.
INTRODUCTION.
CHAPTER 1. THE RIGHTS AND INVOLVED DUTIES OF MANKIND CONSIDERED.
CHAPTER 2. THE PREVAILING OPINION OF A SEXUAL CHARACTER DISCUSSED.
CHAPTER 3. THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED.
CHAPTER 4. OBSERVATIONS ON THE STATE OF DEGRADATION TO WHICH WOMAN IS REDUCED BY
VARIOUS CAUSES.
CHAPTER 5. ANIMADVERSIONS ON SOME OF THE WRITERS WHO HAVE RENDERED WOMEN OBJECTS OF
PITY, BORDERING ON CONTEMPT.
CHAPTER 6. THE EFFECT WHICH AN EARLY ASSOCIATION OF IDEAS HAS UPON THE CHARACTER.
CHAPTER 7. MODESTY. COMPREHENSIVELY CONSIDERED, AND NOT AS A SEXUAL VIRTUE.
CHAPTER 8. MORALITY UNDERMINED BY SEXUAL NOTIONS OF THE IMPORTANCE OF A GOOD
REPUTATION
CHAPTER 9. OF THE PERNICIOUS EFFECTS WHICH ARISE FROM THE UNNATURAL DISTINCTIONS
ESTABLISHED IN SOCIETY.
CHAPTER 10. PARENTAL AFFECTION.
CHAPTER 11. DUTY TO PARENTS
CHAPTER 12. ON NATIONAL EDUCATION
CHAPTER 13. SOME INSTANCES OF THE FOLLY WHICH THE IGNORANCE OF WOMEN GENERATES; WITH
CONCLUDING REFLECTIONS ON THE MORAL IMPROVEMENT THAT A REVOLUTION IN FEMALE MANNERS
MAY NATURALLY BE EXPECTED TO PRODUCE. 8 April, 2001
A BRIEF SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT.
M. Wollstonecraft was born in 1759. Her father was so great a wanderer, that the place of her birth is uncertain;
she supposed, however, it was London, or Epping Forest: at the latter place she spent the ?rst ?ve years of her
life. In early youth she exhibited traces of exquisite sensibility, soundness of understanding, and decision of
character; but her father being a despot in his family, and her mother one of his subjects, Mary, derived little
bene?t from their parental training. She received no literary instructions but such as were to be had in ordinary day
schools. Before her sixteenth year she became acquainted with Mr. Clare a clergyman, and Miss Frances Blood;
the latter, two years older than herself; who possessing good taste and some knowledge of the ?ne arts, seems to
have given the ?rst impulse to the formation of her character. At the age of nineteen, she left her parents, and
resided with a Mrs. Dawson for two years; when she returned to the parental roof to give attention to her mother,
whose ill health made her presence necessary. On the death of her mother, Mary bade a ?nal adieu to her father's
house, and became the inmate of F. Blood; thus situated, their intimacy increased, and a strong attachment was
reciprocated. In 1783 she commenced a day school at Newington green, in conjunction with her friend, F. Blood.
At this place she became acquainted with Dr. Price, to whom she became strongly attached; the regard was mutual.
It is said that she became a teacher from motives of benevolence, or rather philanthropy, and during the time she
continued in the profession, she gave proof of superior quali?cation for the performance of its arduous and
important duties. Her friend and coadjutor married and removed to Lisbon, in Portugal, where she died of a
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