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The Warden

Hiram's Hospital
The Rev. Septimus Harding was, a few years since, a beneficed clergyman residing in the
cathedral town of ---; let us call it Barchester. Were we to name Wells or Salisbury,
Exeter, Hereford, or Gloucester, it might be presumed that something personal was
intended; and as this tale will refer mainly to the cathedral dignitaries of the town in
question, we are anxious that no personality may be suspected. Let us presume that
Barchester is a quiet town in the West of England, more remarkable for the beauty of its
cathedral and the antiquity of its monuments than for any commercial prosperity; that the
west end of Barchester is the cathedral close, and that the aristocracy of Barchester are
the bishop, dean, and canons, with their respective wives and daughters.
Early in life Mr Harding found himself located at Barchester. A fine voice and a taste for
sacred music had decided the position in which he was to exercise his calling, and for
many years he performed the easy but not highly paid duties of a minor canon. At the age
of forty a small living in the close vicinity of the town increased both his work and his
income, and at the age of fifty he became precentor of the cathedral.
Mr Harding had married early in life, and was the father of two daughters. The eldest,
Susan, was born soon after his marriage; the other, Eleanor, not till ten years later.
At the time at which we introduce him to our readers he was living as precentor at
Barchester with his youngest daughter, then twenty-four years of age; having been many
years a widower, and having married his eldest daughter to a son of the bishop a very
short time before his installation to the office of precentor.
Scandal at Barchester affirmed that had it not been for the beauty of his daughter, Mr
Harding would have remained a minor canon, but here probably Scandal lied, as she so
often does; for even as a minor canon no one had been more popular among his reverend
brethren in the close than Mr Harding; and Scandal, before she had reprobated Mr
Harding for being made precentor by his friend the bishop, had loudly blamed the bishop
for having so long omitted to do something for his friend Mr Harding. Be this as it may,
Susan Harding, some twelve years since, had married the Rev. Dr Theophilus Grantly,
son of the bishop, archdeacon of Barchester, and rector of Plumstead Episcopi, and her
father became, a few months later, precentor of Barchester Cathedral, that office being, as
is not usual, in the bishop's gift.
Now there are peculiar circumstances connected with the precentorship which must be
explained. In the year 1434 there died at Barchester one John Hiram, who had made
money in the town as a wool-stapler, and in his will he left the house in which he died
and certain meadows and closes near the town, still called Hiram's Butts, and Hiram's
Patch, for the support of twelve superannuated wool-carders, all of whom should have
been born and bred and spent their days in Barchester; he also appointed that an alms-
house should be built for their abode, with a fitting residence for a warden, which warden
was also to receive a certain sum annually out of the rents of the said butts and patches.
 
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