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The Universe in an Hourglass: A Time for Everything

As the perceptual count increases, the numbers one through nine repeat themselves. In a base-ten
counting system, the combinations of those numbers of value and the placeholder zero were used to
create larger numbers to represent larger values.
The numbers twenty-six and seventeen are able to be broken down to eight, shown below. Nineteen
and ten are able to be broken down to one, shown below.
To demonstrate that this way of breaking down numbers is mathematically factual: the numbers
twenty-six, seventeen, and eight, when divided by eighty-one, result in the infinity sequence from
which the one is missing. This is an inescapable fact. Likewise, nineteen, ten and one: when
individually divided by eighty-one, result in the infinity sequence from which the number eight is
missing.
When divided by eighty-one, any number that can be broken down to one or eight equals the
appropriate infinity sequence. The last number on a calculator is based on how many places a calculator
can hold, and is rounded up to stop the endless repeating infinity sequence.
The numbers 1, 10, 19, 28, 37, 46, 55, 64, 73, 82, 91 and 100 individually divided by eighty-one are
equal to the sequence of numbers from which the eight is missing. Starting with the number one and
increasing by increments of nine allows the first infinity sequence to be tracked. (All those numbers can
be broken down to the number one (0 = 1 + 0 = 1).
Likewise, the numbers 8, 17, 26, 35, 44, 53, 62, 71, 80, 89, 98 and 107 individually divided by
eighty-one are equal to the sequence of numbers from which the one is missing. Starting with the
number eight and increasing by increments of nine allows the second infinity sequence to be tracked as
well. (All those numbers can be broken down to the number eight (17 = 1 + 7 = 8).
 
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