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The Tin Woodman of Oz

6. The Magic of a Yookoohoo
Woot had seen very little of magic during his wanderings, while the Scarecrow and the
Tin Woodman had seen a great deal of many sorts in their lives, yet all three were greatly
impressed by Mrs. Yoop's powers. She did not affect any mysterious airs or indulge in
chants or mystic rites, as most witches do, nor was the Giantess old and ugly or
disagreeable in face or manner. Nevertheless, she frightened her prisoners more than any
witch could have done.
"Please be seated," she said to them, as she sat herself down in a great arm-chair and
spread her beautiful embroidered skirts for them to admire. But all the chairs in the room
were so high that our friends could not climb to the seats of them. Mrs. Yoop observed
this and waved her hand, when instantly a golden ladder appeared leaning against a chair
opposite her own.
"Climb up," said she, and they obeyed, the Tin Man and the boy assisting the more
clumsy Scarecrow. When they were all seated in a row on the cushion of the chair, the
Giantess continued: "Now tell me how you happened to travel in this direction, and
where you came from and what your errand is."
So the Tin Woodman told her all about Nimmie Amee, and how he had decided to find
her and marry her, although he had no Loving Heart. The story seemed to amuse the big
woman, who then began to ask the Scarecrow questions and for the first time in her life
heard of Ozma of Oz, and of Dorothy and Jack Pumpkinhead and Dr. Pipt and Tik-tok
and many other Oz people who are well known in the Emerald City. Also Woot had to
tell his story, which. was very simple and did not take long. The Giantess laughed
heartily when the boy related their adventure at Loonville, but said she knew nothing of
the Loons because she never left her Valley.
"There are wicked people who would like to capture me, as they did my giant husband,
Mr. Yoop," said she; "so I stay at home and mind my own business."
"If Ozma knew that you dared to work magic without her consent, she would punish you
severely," declared the Scarecrow, "for this castle is in the Land of Oz, and no persons in
the Land of Oz are permitted to work magic except Glinda the Good and the little Wizard
who lives with Ozma in the Emerald City."
"That for your Ozma!" exclaimed the Giantess, snapping her fingers in derision. "What
do I care for a girl whom I have never seen and who has never seen me?"
"But Ozma is a fairy," said the Tin Woodman, and therefore she is very powerful. Also,
we are under Ozma's protection, and to injure us in any way would make her extremely
angry."
"What I do here, in my own private castle in this secluded Valley -- where no one comes
but fools like you -- can never be known to your fairy Ozma," returned the Giantess. "Do
 
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