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The Three Musketeers

In Which The Equipment Of Aramis And Porthos Is
Treated Of
Since the four friends had been each in search of his equipments, there had been no fixed
meeting between them. They dined apart from one another, wherever they might happen
to be, or rather where they could. Duty likewise on its part took a portion of that precious
time which was gliding away so rapidly--only they had agreed to meet once a week,
about one o'clock, at the residence of Athos, seeing that he, in agreement with the vow he
had formed, did not pass over the threshold of his door.
This day of reunion was the same day as that on which Kitty came to find d'Artagnan.
Soon as Kitty left him, d'Artagnan directed his steps toward the Rue Ferou.
He found Athos and Aramis philosophizing. Aramis had some slight inclination to
resume the cassock. Athos, according to his system, neither encouraged nor dissuaded
him. Athos believed that everyone should be left to his own free will. He never gave
advice but when it was asked, and even then he required to be asked twice.
"People, in general," he said, "only ask advice not to follow it; or if they do follow it, it is
for the sake of having someone to blame for having given it."
Porthos arrived a minute after d'Artagnan. The four friends were reunited.
The four countenances expressed four different feelings: that of Porthos, tranquillity; that
of d'Artagnan, hope; that of Aramis, uneasiness; that of Athos, carelessness.
At the end of a moment's conversation, in which Porthos hinted that a lady of elevated
rank had condescended to relieve him from his embarrassment, Mousqueton entered. He
came to request his master to return to his lodgings, where his presence was urgent, as he
piteously said.
"Is it my equipment?"
"Yes and no," replied Mousqueton.
"Well, but can't you speak?"
"Come, monsieur."
Porthos rose, saluted his friends, and followed Mousqueton. An instant after, Bazin made
his appearance at the door.
"What do you want with me, my friend?" said Aramis, with that mildness of language
which was observable in him every time that his ideas were directed toward the Church.
 
 
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