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The Spirit of the Border

Chapter 1.
"Nell, I'm growing powerful fond of you."
"So you must be, Master Joe, if often telling makes it true."
The girl spoke simply, and with an absence of that roguishness which was characteristic
of her. Playful words, arch smiles, and a touch of coquetry had seemed natural to Nell;
but now her grave tone and her almost wistful glance disconcerted Joe.
During all the long journey over the mountains she had been gay and bright, while now,
when they were about to part, perhaps never to meet again, she showed him the deeper
and more earnest side of her character. It checked his boldness as nothing else had done.
Suddenly there came to him the real meaning of a woman's love when she bestows it
without reservation. Silenced by the thought that he had not understood her at all, and the
knowledge that he had been half in sport, he gazed out over the wild country before them.
The scene impressed its quietness upon the young couple and brought more forcibly to
their minds the fact that they were at the gateway of the unknown West; that somewhere
beyond this rude frontier settlement, out there in those unbroken forests stretching dark
and silent before them, was to be their future home.
From the high bank where they stood the land sloped and narrowed gradually until it
ended in a sharp point which marked the last bit of land between the Allegheny and
Monongahela rivers. Here these swift streams merged and formed the broad Ohio. The
new-born river, even here at its beginning proud and swelling as if already certain of its
far-away grandeur, swept majestically round a wide curve and apparently lost itself in the
forest foliage.
On the narrow point of land commanding a view of the rivers stood a long, low structure
enclosed by a stockade fence, on the four corners of which were little box-shaped houses
that bulged out as if trying to see what was going on beneath. The massive timbers used
in the construction of this fort, the square, compact form, and the small, dark holes cut
into the walls, gave the structure a threatening, impregnable aspect.
Below Nell and Joe, on the bank, were many log cabins. The yellow clay which filled the
chinks between the logs gave these a peculiar striped appearance. There was life and
bustle in the vicinity of these dwellings, in sharp contrast with the still grandeur of the
neighboring forests. There were canvas-covered wagons around which curly-headed
youngsters were playing. Several horses were grazing on the short grass, and six red and
white oxen munched at the hay that had been thrown to them. The smoke of many fires
curled upward, and near the blaze hovered ruddy-faced women who stirred the contents
of steaming kettles. One man swung an axe with a vigorous sweep, and the clean, sharp
strokes rang on the air; another hammered stakes into the ground on which to hang a
 
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