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The Secret Garden

23.
Magic
Dr. Craven had been waiting some time at the house when they returned to it. He had
indeed begun to wonder if it might not be wise to send some one out to explore the
garden paths. When Colin was brought back to his room the poor man looked him over
seriously.
"You should not have stayed so long," he said. "You must not overexert yourself."
"I am not tired at all," said Colin. "It has made me well. Tomorrow I am going out in the
morning as well as in the afternoon."
"I am not sure that I can allow it," answered Dr. Craven. "I am afraid it would not be
wise."
"It would not be wise to try to stop me," said Colin quite seriously. "I am going."
Even Mary had found out that one of Colin's chief peculiarities was that he did not know
in the least what a rude little brute he was with his way of ordering people about. He had
lived on a sort of desert island all his life and as he had been the king of it he had made
his own manners and had had no one to compare himself with. Mary had indeed been
rather like him herself and since she had been at Misselthwaite had gradually discovered
that her own manners had not been of the kind which is usual or popular. Having made
this discovery she naturally thought it of enough interest to communicate to Colin. So she
sat and looked at him curiously for a few minutes after Dr. Craven had gone. She wanted
to make him ask her why she was doing it and of course she did.
"What are you looking at me for?" he said.
"I'm thinking that I am rather sorry for Dr. Craven."
"So am I," said Colin calmly, but not without an air of some satisfaction. "He won't get
Misselthwaite at all now I'm not going to die."
"I'm sorry for him because of that, of course," said Mary, "but I was thinking just then
that it must have been very horrid to have had to be polite for ten years to a boy who was
always rude. I would never have done it."
"Am I rude?" Colin inquired undisturbedly.
"If you had been his own boy and he had been a slapping sort of man," said Mary, "he
would have slapped you."
"But he daren't," said Colin.
 
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