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The Portrait of a Lady

Chapter 11
He took a resolve after this not to misinterpret her words even when Miss
Stackpole appeared to strike the personal note most strongly. He bethought
himself that persons, in her view, were simple and homogeneous organisms, and
that he, for his own part, was too perverted a representative of the nature of man
to have a right to deal with her in strict reciprocity. He carried out his resolve with
a great deal of tact, and the young lady found in renewed contact with him no
obstacle to the exercise of her genius for unshrinking enquiry, the general
application of her confidence. Her situation at Gardencourt therefore, appreciated
as we have seen her to be by Isabel and full of appreciation herself of that free
play of intelligence which, to her sense, rendered Isabel's character a sister-spirit,
and of the easy venerableness of Mr. Touchett, whose noble tone, as she said,
met with her full approval--her situation at Gardencourt would have been
perfectly comfortable had she not conceived an irresistible mistrust of the little
lady for whom she had at first supposed herself obliged to "allow" as mistress of
the house. She presently discovered, in truth, that this obligation was of the
lightest and that Mrs. Touchett cared very little how Miss Stackpole behaved.
Mrs. Touchett had defined her to Isabel as both an adventuress and a bore--
adventuresses usually giving one more of a thrill; she had expressed some
surprise at her niece's having selected such a friend, yet had immediately added
that she knew Isabel's friends were her own affair and that she had never
undertaken to like them all or to restrict the girl to those she liked.
"If you could see none but the people I like, my dear, you'd have a very small
society," Mrs. Touchett frankly admitted; "and I don't think I like any man or
woman well enough to recommend them to you. When it comes to
recommending it's a serious affair. I don't like Miss Stackpole--everything about
her displeases me; she talks so much too loud and looks at one as if one wanted
to look at her--which one doesn't. I'm sure she has lived all her life in a boarding-
house, and I detest the manners and the liberties of such places. If you ask me if
I prefer my own manners, which you doubtless think very bad, I'll tell you that I
prefer them immensely. Miss Stackpole knows I detest boarding-house
civilisation, and she detests me for detesting it, because she thinks it the highest
in the world. She'd like Gardencourt a great deal better if it were a boarding-
house. For me, I find it almost too much of one! We shall never get on together
therefore, and there's no use trying."
Mrs. Touchett was right in guessing that Henrietta disapproved of her, but she
had not quite put her finger on the reason. A day or two after Miss Stackpole's
arrival she had made some invidious reflexions on American hotels, which
excited a vein of counter-argument on the part of the correspondent of the
Interviewer, who in the exercise of her profession had acquainted herself, in the
western world, with every form of caravansary. Henrietta expressed the opinion
that American hotels were the best in the world, and Mrs. Touchett, fresh from a
renewed struggle with them, recorded a conviction that they were the worst.
Ralph, with his experimental geniality, suggested, by way of healing the breach,
 
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