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The Phenomenology of Mind


THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF MIND
rational; and the friendliness of the individual in making allusion to a notion is a childlike friendliness, which
is childish if, as it stands, it is to be or wants to be worth anything.
1. Directed again Kant and Fichte.
2. A term employed by a chemist, Winterl, at the beginning of the nineteenth century to denote combinations
intermediate in character between physical mixtures and chemical combinations. In synsomates the bodies
undergo in the product, e.g. a change of colour, specific density, and even weight; these changes do not take
place in mere physical mixtures, and yet they do not constitute chemical combination. Examples of
synsomates are the blending of water and alcohol, and amalgrans of minerals.
3. Heat, e.g. is a "mode of motion", a form of "energy".
4. Cp. With the above, the oscillation between the mechanical and teleological conception of "law" in
theoretical biology.
5. Cp. Logik, W. W., V. p. 153: "The earth as a concrete whole is at once a universal nature or genus as well
as an individual." Cp. Also Naturphilosophie, ¤¤ 337, 338.
b. OBSERVATION OF SELF−CONSCIOUSNESS IN ITS PURE FORM AND
IN ITS RELATION TO EXTERNAL REALITY−LOGICAL AND
PSYCHOLOGICAL LAWS
[[Translator's comments: Observation can be directed upon the self−conscious process of mind in two ways:
it may consider the mind's thinking relation to reality, and it may consider the mind's active or biotic relation
to reality. The result of observation here, as in the foregoing cases, finds expression in a number of laws,
which it "frames". The "laws" in the first case are "laws of thought" or connected logical laws: in the latter
case we have laws of psychic events, "psychological" laws.
The analysis in this section shows the inadequacy of observation as such to deal with its material in both
cases. It fails in the first case because (1) "laws of thought" have no meaning apart from the reality with
which thought is necessarily concerned; laws of thought are laws of "thinking", and thinking is both form and
content: (2) observation gives each law an absolute being of its own, as if it were detached from the unity of
self−consciousness, whereas this unity is the fundamental principle of each and al the laws, which only exist
in and by the single process of that unity. Hence a type of logic confined to "observing" laws of thought is
necessarily untrue. Observation again fails in the second case because it is impossible to separate mind from
its total environment. Observational or empirical psychology therefore is incapable of giving an adequate
account of mind the constitution of the environment enters into and in part determines the constitution of the
psychic events, and the latter cannot be explained even as events without interpreting the former at the same
time.]]
b. OBSERVATION OF SELF−CONSCIOUSNESS IN ITS PURE FORM AND
IN ITS RELATION TO EXTERNAL REALITY−LOGICAL AND
PSYCHOLOGICAL LAWS
Observation of nature finds the notion realized in inorganic nature, laws, whose moments are things which at
the same time are in the position of abstractions. But this notion is not a simplicity reflected into self. The life
of organic nature, on the other hand, is only this self−reflected simplicity. The opposition within itself, in the
sense of the opposition of universal and individual, does not make its appearance in the essential nature of
b. OBSERVATION OF SELF−CONSCIOUSNESS IN ITS PURE FORM AND IN ITS RELATION TO EXTERNAL REALITY−LOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL LAWS
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