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The Master of the World

Chapter 13. On Board The Terror
When I came to my senses it was daylight. A half light pierced the thick glass port-hole
of the narrow cabin wherein someone had placed me -- how many hours ago, I could not
say! Yet it seemed to me by the slanting rays, that the sun could not be very far above the
horizon.
I was resting in a narrow bunk with coverings over me. My clothes, hanging in a corner,
had been dried. My belt, torn in half by the hook of the iron, lay on the floor.
I felt no wound nor injury, only a little weakness. If I had lost consciousness, I was sure it
had not been from a blow. My head must have been drawn beneath the water, when I was
tangled in the cable. I should have been suffocated, if someone had not dragged me from
the lake.
Now, was I on board the "Terror?" And was I alone with the Captain and his two men?
This seemed probable, almost certain. The whole scene of our encounter rose before my
eyes, Hart lying wounded upon the bank; Wells firing shot after shot, Walker hurled
down at the instant when the grappling hook caught my belt! And my companions? On
their side, must not they think that I had perished in the waters of Lake Erie?
Where was the "Terror" now, and how was it navigating? Was it moving as an
automobile? Speeding across the roads of some neighboring State? If so, and if I had
been unconscious for many hours, the machine with its tremendous powers must be
already far away. Or, on the other hand, were we, as a submarine, following some course
beneath the lake?
No, the "Terror" was moving upon some broad liquid surface. The sunlight, penetrating
my cabin, showed that the window was not submerged. On the other hand, I felt none of
the jolting that the automobile must have suffered even on the smoothest highway. Hence
the "Terror" was not traveling upon land.
As to deciding whether she was still traversing Lake Erie, that was another matter. Had
not the Captain reascended the Detroit River, and entered Lake Huron, or even Lake
Superior beyond? It was difficult to say.
At any rate I decided to go up on deck. From there I might be able to judge. Dragging
myself somewhat heavily from the bunk, I reached for my clothes and dressed, though
without much energy. Was I not probably locked within this cabin?
The only exit seemed by a ladder and hatchway above my head. The hatch rose readily to
my hand, and I ascended half way on deck.
 
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