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The How You Can Adopt a Child Handbook

Myths about adoption
MYTH 1: ALL ADOPTIONS ARE EXPENSIVE
Costs vary by agency and may be related to how the agency
is funded, where their children come from, and what services
they provide to birth parents and adoptive families.
Adoptions of healthy infants in the United States and of
children from abroad typically cost between $5,000 and
$25,000, and could possibly be higher in some
circumstances. The adoption of a child waiting in foster care
can be virtually without cost if the family works directly with a
public social services agency. In fact, many public agencies
provide adoption subsidies for children who are waiting for a
family. (Subsidies are discussed later in this book.) If the
family works through a private adoption agency, the costs
are likely to be higher, but rarely as high as they would be for
adopting an infant. Finally, some private agencies may
adjust their fees based on family income or other criteria.
MYTH 2: PROSPECTIVE ADOPTIVE FAMILIES
MUST BE "RICH"
Many people with modest incomes adopt every year.
Adoption professionals who make decisions about placing
children generally are more concerned about the family's
financial stability and how well they manage the financial
resources they do have than about the actual income.
MYTH 3: FAMILIES MUST OWN THEIR OWN HOME
Families who rent homes or live in apartments adopt children
all the time.
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