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The Guilty River

1. On The Way To The River
FOR reasons of my own, I excused myself from accompanying my stepmother to a
dinner-party given in our neighborhood. In my present humor, I preferred being alone--
and, as a means of getting through my idle time, I was quite content to be occupied in
catching insects.
Provided with a brush and a mixture of rum and treacle, I went into Fordwitch Wood to
set the snare, familiar to hunters of moths, which we call sugaring the trees.
The summer evening was hot and still; the time was between dusk and dark. After ten
years of absence in foreign parts, I perceived changes in the outskirts of the wood, which
warned me not to enter it too confidently when I might find a difficulty in seeing my way.
Remaining among the outermost trees, I painted the trunks with my treacherous mixture--
which allured the insects of the night, and stupefied them when they settled on its rank
surface. The snare being set, I waited to see the intoxication of the moths.
A time passed, dull and dreary. The mysterious assemblage of trees was blacker than the
blackening sky. Of millions of leaves over my head, none pleased my ear, in the airless
calm, with their rustling summer song.
The first flying creatures, dimly visible by moments under the gloomy sky, were enemies
whom I well knew by experience. Many a fine insect specimen have I lost, when the bats
were near me in search of their evening meal.
What had happened before, in other woods, happened now. The first moth that I had
snared was a large one, and a specimen well worth securing. As I stretched out my hand
to take it, the apparition of a flying shadow passed, swift and noiseless, between me and
the tree. In less than an instant the insect was snatched away, when my fingers were
within an inch of it. The bat had begun his supper, and the man and the mixture had
provided it for him.
Out of five moths caught, I became the victim of clever theft in the case of three. The
other two, of no great value as specimens, I was just quick enough to secure. Under other
circumstances, my patience as a collector would still have been a match for the dexterity
of the bats. But on that evening--a memorable evening when I look back at it now--my
spirits were depressed, and I was easily discouraged. My favorite studies of the insect-
world seemed to have lost their value in my estimation. In the silence and the darkness I
lay down under a tree, and let my mind dwell on myself and on my new life to come.
I am Gerard Roylake, son and only child of the late Gerard Roylake of Trimley Deen.
 
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