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The Federalist Papers


dignity, and your happiness. I aect not reserves which I do not feel.
I will not amuse you wit h an appearance of deliberation when I have
decided. I frankly acknowledge to you my convictions, and I will freely
lay before you the reasons on which they are founded. The consciousness
of good intentions disdains ambiguity. I shall not, however, multiply
professions on this head. My motives must remain in the depository of my
own breast. My arguments will be open to all, and may be judged of by
all. They shall at least be oered in a spirit whic h will not disgrace
the cause of truth.
I propose, in a series of papers, to discuss the following interesting
particulars:
THE UTILITY OF THE UNION TO YOUR POLITICA L PROSPE RITY
THE INSUFFICIENCY
OF THE PRESENT CONFE DERA TION TO PRESE RVE THA T UNION THE
NECESS ITY OF A
GOVERNMENT A T LEAS T EQUALLY ENERGE TIC WITH THE ONE PRO-
POSED, TO THE
ATTA INMENT OF THIS OBJE CT THE CONFORMITY OF THE PRO-
POSED CONS TITUTION TO
THE TRUE PRINCIPLES OF REP UBLICA N GOVE RNMENT ITS ANAL -
OGY TO YOUR OWN
STA TE CONS TITUTION and lastly, THE ADDITIONA L SECURITY WHICH
3
ITS
ADOP TION WILL AFFORD TO THE PRESERVA TION OF THA T SPECIES
OF GOVERNME NT,
TO LIBE RTY, AND TO PROPE RTY.
In the progress of this discussion I shall endeavor to give a
satisfactory answer to all the ob jections which shall have made their
appearance, that may seem to have any claim to your attention.
It may perhaps be thought superfluous to oer arguments to prove the
utility of the UNION, a point, no doubt, deeply engraved on the hearts
of the great body of the people in every State, and one, which it may be
imagined, has no adversaries. But the fact is, that we already hear it
whispered in the private circles of thos e who oppose the new
Constitution, that the thirteen States are of too great extent for any
general system, and that we must of necessity resort to separate
confederacies of distinct portions of the whole.[1] This doctrine will,
in all probability, be gradually propagated, till it has votaries enough
to countenance an open avowal of it. For nothing can be more evident, to
those who are able to take an enlarged view of the sub ject, than the
alternative of an adoption of the new Constitution or a dismemberment of
the Union. It will therefore be of use to begin by examining the
advantages of that Union, the certain evils, and the probable dangers,
to which every State will be exposed from its dissolution. This shall
accordingly constitute the sub ject of my next address.
PUBLIUS
1. The same idea, tracing the arguments to their consequences, is held
out in several of the late publications against the new Constitution.
FEDERA LIS T No. 2
Conc erning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
For the Independent Journal.
Wednesday, October 31, 1787
JAY
To the People of the State of New York:
WHEN the people of America reflect that they are now called upon to
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