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The Double - Dealer

ACT IV
SCENE I.
MELLEFONT and CYNTHIA.
CYNT. I heard him loud as I came by the closet-door, and my lady with him, but she
seemed to moderate his passion.
MEL. Ay, hell thank her, as gentle breezes moderate a fire; but I shall counter-work her
spells, and ride the witch in her own bridle.
CYNT. It's impossible; she'll cast beyond you still. I'll lay my life it will never be a
match.
MEL. What?
CYNT. Between you and me.
MEL. Why so?
CYNT. My mind gives me it won't, because we are both willing. We each of us strive to
reach the goal, and hinder one another in the race. I swear it never does well when the
parties are so agreed; for when people walk hand in hand there's neither overtaking nor
meeting. We hunt in couples, where we both pursue the same game but forget one
another; and 'tis because we are so near that we don't think of coming together.
MEL. Hum, 'gad I believe there's something in it. Marriage is the game that we hunt, and
while we think that we only have it in view, I don't see but we have it in our power.
CYNT. Within reach; for example, give me your hand. You have looked through the
wrong end of the perspective all this while, for nothing has been between us but our fears.
MEL. I don't know why we should not steal out of the house this very moment and marry
one another, without consideration or the fear of repentance. Pox o' fortune, portion,
settlements, and jointures.
CYNT. Ay, ay, what have we to do with 'em? You know we marry for love.
MEL. Love, love, downright, very villainous love.
CYNT. And he that can't live upon love deserves to die in a ditch. Here then, I give you
my promise, in spite of duty, any temptation of wealth, your inconstancy, or my own
inclination to change -
 
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