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The Dancing Mouse


CHAPTER IV
BEHAVIOR: EQUILIB RA TION A ND DIZZINESS
Muscular coordination–Statements of Cyon and Zoth concerning behavior–
Cont rol of movements, orientation, equilibration, movement on inclined
surfaces, climbing–The tracks of the danc er–A bsence of visual
dizziness–Comparison of the behavior of the dancer with that of the
common mouse when they are rotated in a cyclostat–Behavior of blinded
dancers (Cyon, Alexander and Kreidl, Kishi)–Cyon’s two types of dancer–
Phenomena of behavior for which structural bases are sought: dance
movements; lack of response to sounds; de?ciency in equilibrational
ability; lack of vis ual and rot ational dizziness.
CHAPTER V
STRUCTURA L PECULIARITIES AND BEHAV IOR
The functions of the ear–Structure of the ear of the dancer as described
by Rawitz, by Panse, by Baginsky, by Alexander and Kreidl, and by Kishi–
Cyon’s theory of the relation of the semicircular canals to space
perception–Condition of the auditory organs–Condition of the
equilibrational organs–Condition of the sound-transmitting organs–The
bearing of the results of anatomical investigations upon the facts of
behavior.
CHAPTER VI
THE SENSE OF HEA RING
Experiments on hearing in the dancer made by Rawitz, by Panse, by Cyon,
by
Alexander and Kreidl, by Zoth, and by Kishi–Hearing and the voice–
Methods of testing sensitiveness to sounds–Results of tests with adults–
Importance of indirect method of ex perimentation–Results of tests with
young–The period of auditory sensitiveness–Individual di?erences.
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CHAPTER VII
THE SENSE OF SIGHT: BRIGHTNESS VISION
What is known concerning sight in the dancer–Brightness vision and color
vision–Methods of testing brightness vision, the visual discrimination
apparatus–Motives for discrimination and choice–Punishment versus reward
as an incentive in animal experiments–Hunger as an incentive–An electric
stimulus as an incentive–Conditions for brightness vision tests–
White-black vision–E vidence of preference–Check experiments–Conclusion.
CHAPTER VIII
THE SENSE OF SIGHT: BRIGHTNESS VISION ( Continued )
The delicacy of brightness discrimination–Methods of testing the dancer’s
ability to detect slight di?erences in brightness–Results of tests with
gray papers–Relation of intensity of vis ual stimuli to the threshold of
discrimination–Weber’s law apparatus and method of experimentation–
Results of Weber’s law tests–Practice e?ects, the training of vision–
Description of the behavior of the dancer in the discrimination box
experiments–Modes of choice: by a?rmation; by negation; by comparison–
E vidence of indiscriminable visual conditions.
CHAPTER IX
THE SENSE OF SIGHT: COLOR VIS ION
Does the dancer see colors?–The food-box method of testing color vision–
Waugh’s food-box method–Results of tests–Tests by the use of colored
papers in the vis ual discrimination box–Yellow-red vision–Blue-orange
vision–Brightness vision versus color vision–Brightness check
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