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The Daisy Chain or Aspirations

Chapter I.16
EVANS. Peace your tattlings. What is fair, William?
WILLIAM. PULCHER.
QUICKLY. Poulcats! there are fairer things than poulcats sure!
EVANS. I pray you have your remembrance, child, accusative
HING HANG HOG.
QUICKLY. HANG HOG is Latin for bacon, I warrant you.
SHAKESPEARE.
In a large family it must often happen, that since every member of it cannot
ride the same hobby, nor at the same time, their several steeds must
sometimes run counter to each other; and so Ethel found it, one morning
when Miss Winter, having a bad cold, had given her an unwonted holiday.
Mr. Wilmot had sent a large parcel of books for her to choose from for
Cocksmoor, but this she could not well do without consultation. The multitude
bewildered her, she was afraid of taking too many or too few, and the being
brought to these practical details made her sensible that though her schemes
were very grand and full for future doings, they passed very lightly over the
intermediate ground. The Paulo post fulurum was a period much more
developed in her imagination than the future, that the present was flowing
into.
Where was her coadjutor, Richard? Writing notes for papa, and not to be
disturbed. She had better have waited tranquilly, but this would not suit her
impatience, and she ran up to Margaret's room. There she found a great
display of ivy leaves, which Norman, who had been turning half the shops in
the town upside down in search of materials, was instructing her to imitate in
leather-work--a regular mania with him, and apparently the same with
Margaret.
In came Ethel. "Oh, Margaret, will you look at these 'First Truths?' Do you
think they would be easy enough? Shall I take some of the Parables and
Miracles at once, or content myself with the book about 'Jane Sparks?'"
"There's some very easy reading in 'Jane Sparks', isn't there? I would not
make the little books from the New Testament too common."
"Take care, that leaf has five points," said Norman.
"Shall I bring you up 'Jane Sparks' to see? Because then you can judge," said
Ethel.
"There, Norman, is that right?--what a beauty! I should like to look over them
by-and-by, dear Ethel, very much."
Ethel gazed and went away, more put out than was usual with her. "When
Margaret has a new kind of fancy work," she thought, "she cares for nothing
 
 
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