Not a member?     Existing members login below:
Holidays Offer
 

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Chapter 4
WELL, three or four months run along, and it was well into the winter now. I had
been to school most all the time and could spell and read and write just a little,
and could say the multiplication table up to six times seven is thirty-five, and I
don't reckon I could ever get any further than that if I was to live forever. I don't
take no stock in mathematics, any- way.
At first I hated the school, but by and by I got so I could stand it. Whenever I got
uncommon tired I played hookey, and the hiding I got next day done me good
and cheered me up. So the longer I went to school the easier it got to be. I was
getting sort of used to the widow's ways, too, and they warn't so raspy on me.
Living in a house and sleeping in a bed pulled on me pretty tight mostly, but
before the cold weather I used to slide out and sleep in the woods sometimes,
and so that was a rest to me. I liked the old ways best, but I was getting so I liked
the new ones, too, a little bit. The widow said I was coming along slow but sure,
and doing very satisfactory. She said she warn't ashamed of me.
One morning I happened to turn over the salt-cellar at breakfast. I reached for
some of it as quick as I could to throw over my left shoulder and keep off the bad
luck, but Miss Watson was in ahead of me, and crossed me off. She says, "Take
your hands away, Huckleberry; what a mess you are always making!" The widow
put in a good word for me, but that warn't going to keep off the bad luck, I
knowed that well enough. I started out, after breakfast, feeling worried and shaky,
and wondering where it was going to fall on me, and what it was going to be.
There is ways to keep off some kinds of bad luck, but this wasn't one of them
kind; so I never tried to do anything, but just poked along low-spirited and on the
watch-out.
 
Remove