Not a member?     Existing members login below:

Stalking the Average Man


façade, done only to placate old sailor‘s ideas of seaworthiness. These techniques led to designs
that made the commune‘s boats drier and sturdier than all known craft, which is why the
community shipwrights always had orders on the skids.
The metal smith said the alchemist would have to explain the strange hue on the fasteners
that would not rust, then changing the subject he said, -We should make a shackle for the
mainsail foot, new sleeves for the rudder and winch, and add two stanchions aft; you‘re not the
first person to throw himself overboard with his net. We‘ll also need a drain in the hull
amidships—make it the size of the sleeves. Large. |
-Drain? Is it not a hole directly into the ocean? | Teyo said, certain he was not mistaken.
-It is required,‘ the Smith replied.
These creations required metals, so into the hills Teyo returned with an apprentice
shipwright to mine the ores. During these journeys, four in all because the master of metals
needed raw materials for other work, Teyo learned more about the architecture of the
landscape—how surface characteristics portend to the existence of sub surface elements, like the
black ooze lesson he didn‘t know he had taken revealed the likely presence of that substance
underfoot.
Smelting and fabricating came next, and when these fixtures were completed, Teyo again
borrowed the carpenter's tools, and his apprentice‘s expertise, to make two turning blocks.
Assisting with these installations, the apprentice demonstrated how one block affixed to a
gunwale with a lateral rotation along the fore and aft line can lift the mast and trim the sail, by
running a halyard through the topmast block. Running a line run through a boom‘s eye, one man
could also raise a heavy catch.
With the help of the young girl making a modification to a sealing concoction, these
mechanisms turned remarkably freely in any weather, which was how Teyo's days also began
running together… free, and working in any weather.
As often as she could Jehaneh spent time with him around dusk, self-consciously
commenting on the dropping temperature, moisture appearing on the foliage, and the changing
speed and direction of nightfall breezes, because it was her remark that six months earlier had
put Teyo in this seemingly endless circumstance of reparation. Teyo could not convince her that
he didn't mind, and spending time with her wasn't the only reason. He had adjusted to the routine
of layering goals, and entwining appropriate aspects of them for efficiency, because it was like
being on the road of survival; except he was warm and dry, and if he went hungry it was by
choice.
-I know you can do it, | Jehaneh said, as she pointed at three stars then absently noted their
drift across the sky, as she did every time she was about to leave him, although Teyo could have
told her their path after two such meetings.
Time passed—Bonnie clearly wasn't concerned with how much—until the day Rashaef
inspected the hull, the hardware, and surprisingly innovative rigging that supported an
ingeniously designed collapsible mast mechanism—Teyo‘s—that made maintenance and
replacement a one- man job, as well.
Nodding his approval at each properly completed project, he said the craft needed only a
small mainsail for ease of handling—speed was not important—and a finely woven bait net.
Rashaef calculated the dimensions of the sail he required, based on a formula that took into
account the former derelict‘s empty displacement, waterline length, and amidships dimensions,
then he taught Teyo the technique for determining how much sail vessels of various sizes could
Remove