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Sight Unseen

Chapter 1
The rather extraordinary story revealed by the experiments of the Neighborhood
Club have been until now a matter only of private record. But it seems to me, as
an active participant in the investigations, that they should be given to the public;
not so much for what they will add to the existing data on psychical research, for
from that angle they were not unusual, but as yet another exploration into that
still uncharted territory, the human mind.
The psycho-analysts have taught us something about the individual mind. They
have their own patter, of complexes and primal instincts, of the unconscious,
which is a sort of bonded warehouse from which we clandestinely withdraw our
stored thoughts and impressions. They lay to this unconscious mind of ours all
phenomena that cannot otherwise be labeled, and ascribe such demonstrations
of power as cannot thus be explained to trickery, to black silk threads and folding
rods, to slates with false sides and a medium with chalk on his finger nail.
In other words, they give us subjective mind but never objective mind. They take
the mind and its reactions on itself and on the body. But what about objective
mind? Does it make its only outward manifestations through speech and action?
Can we ignore the effect of mind on mind, when there are present none of the
ordinary media of communication? I think not.
In making the following statement concerning our part in the strange case of
Arthur Wells, a certain allowance must be made for our ignorance of so-called
psychic phenomena, and also for the fact that since that time, just before the war,
great advances have been made in scientific methods of investigation. For
instance, we did not place Miss Jeremy's chair on a scale, to measure for any
loss of weight. Also the theory of rods of invisible matter emanating from the
medium's body, to move bodies at a distance from her, had only been evolved;
 
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