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Pink and White Tyranny


XX. THE VAN ASTRACHANS
XXI. MRS. FOLLINGSBEE'S PARTY, AND WHAT CAME OF IT
XXII. THE SPIDER-WEB BROKEN
XXIII. COMMON-SENSE ARGUMENTS
XXIV. SENTIMENT _v_. SENSIBILITY
XXV. WEDDING BELLS
XXVI. MOTHERHOOD
XXVII. CHECKMATE
XXVIII. AFTER THE STORM
XXIX. THE NEW LILLIE
CHAPTER I.
_FALLING IN LOVE_.
[Illustration: LILLIE.]
"Who _is_ that beautiful creature?" said John Seymour, as a light,
sylph-like form tripped up the steps of the veranda of the hotel where
he was lounging away his summer vacation.
"That! Why, don't you know, man? That is the celebrated, the divine
Lillie Ellis, the most adroit 'fisher of men' that has been seen in
our days."
"By George, but she's pretty, though!" said John, following with
enchanted eyes the distant motions of the sylphide.
The vision that he saw was of a delicate little fairy form; a
complexion of pearly white, with a cheek of the hue of a pink shell;
a fair, sweet, infantine face surrounded by a fleecy radiance of soft
golden hair. The vision appeared to float in some white gauzy robes;
and, when she spoke or smiled, what an innocent, fresh, untouched,
unspoiled look there was upon the face! John gazed, and thought of all
sorts of poetical similes: of a "daisy just wet with morning dew;" of
a "violet by a mossy stone;" in short, of all the things that poets
have made and provided for the use of young gentlemen in the way of
falling in love.
This John Seymour was about as good and honest a man as there is going
in this world of ours. He was a generous, just, manly, religious young
fellow. He was heir to a large, solid property; he was a well-read
lawyer, established in a flourishing business; he was a man that all
the world spoke well of, and had cause to speak well of. The only
duty to society which John had left as yet unperformed was that
of matrimony. Three and thirty years had passed; and, with every
advantage for supporting a wife, with a charming home all ready for
a mistress, John, as yet, had not proposed to be the defender and
provider for any of the more helpless portion of creation. The cause
of this was, in the first place, that John was very happy in the
society of a sister, a little older than himself, who managed his
house admirably, and was a charming companion to his leisure
hours; and, in the second place, that he had a secret, bashful
self-depreciation in regard to his power of pleasing women, which made
him ill at ease in their society. Not that he did not mean to marry.
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