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Oliver Twist

Chapter 34
CONTAINS SOME INTRODUCTORY PARTICULARS RELATIVE TO A
YOUNG GENTLEMAN WHO NOW ARRIVES UPON THE SCENE; AND A
NEW ADVENTURE WHICH HAPPENED TO OLIVER
It was almost too much happiness to bear. Oliver felt stunned and stupefied by the
unexpected intelligence; he could not weep, or speak, or rest. He had scarcely the power
of understanding anything that had passed, until, after a long ramble in the quiet evening
air, a burst of tears came to his relief, and he seemed to awaken, all at once, to a full sense
of the joyful change that had occurred, and the almost insupportable load of anguish
which had been taken from his breast.
The night was fast closing in, when he returned homeward: laden with flowers which he
had culled, with peculiar care, for the adornment of the sick chamber. As he walked
briskly along the road, he heard behind him, the noise of some vehicle, approaching at a
furious pace. Looking round, he saw that it was a post-chaise, driven at great speed; and
as the horses were galloping, and the road was narrow, he stood leaning against a gate
until it should have passed him.
As it dashed on, Oliver caught a glimpse of a man in a white nitecap, whose face seemed
familiar to him, although his view was so brief that he could not identify the person. In
another second or two, the nightcap was thrust out of the chaise-window, and a stentorian
voice bellowed to the driver to stop: which he did, as soon as he could pull up his horses.
Then, the nightcap once again appeared: and the same voice called Oliver by his name.
'Here!' cried the voice. 'Oliver, what's the news? Miss Rose! Master O-li-ver!'
'Is is you, Giles?' cried Oliver, running up to the chaise-door.
Giles popped out his nightcap again, preparatory to making some reply, when he was
suddenly pulled back by a young gentleman who occupied the other corner of the chaise,
and who eagerly demanded what was the news.
'In a word!' cried the gentleman, 'Better or worse?'
'Better--much better!' replied Oliver, hastily.
'Thank Heaven!' exclaimed the gentleman. 'You are sure?'
'Quite, sir,' replied Oliver. 'The change took place only a few hours ago; and Mr.
Losberne says, that all danger is at an end.'
The gentleman said not another word, but, opening the chaise-door, leaped out, and
taking Oliver hurriedly by the arm, led him aside.
 
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