Not a member?     Existing members login below:
Holidays Offer
 

Kilmeny of the Orchard

I. The Thoughts Of Youth
The sunshine of a day in early spring, honey pale and honey sweet, was showering
over the red brick buildings of Queenslea College and the grounds about them, throwing
through the bare, budding maples and elms, delicate, evasive etchings of gold and
brown on the paths, and coaxing into life the daffodils that were peering greenly and
perkily up under the windows of the co-eds' dressing-room.
A young April wind, as fresh and sweet as if it had been blowing over the fields of
memory instead of through dingy streets, was purring in the tree-tops and whipping the
loose tendrils of the ivy network which covered the front of the main building. It was a
wind that sang of many things, but what it sang to each listener was only what was in
that listener's heart. To the college students who had just been capped and diplomad by
"Old Charlie," the grave president of Queenslea, in the presence of an admiring throng
of parents and sisters, sweethearts and friends, it sang, perchance, of glad hope and
shining success and high achievement. It sang of the dreams of youth that may never
be quite fulfilled, but are well worth the dreaming for all that. God help the man who has
never known such dreams--who, as he leaves his alma mater, is not already rich in
aerial castles, the proprietor of many a spacious estate in Spain. He has missed his
birthright.
The crowd streamed out of the entrance hall and scattered over the campus, fraying off
into the many streets beyond. Eric Marshall and David Baker walked away together.
The former had graduated in Arts that day at the head of his class; the latter had come
to see the graduation, nearly bursting with pride in Eric's success.
Between these two was an old and tried and enduring friendship, although David was
ten years older than Eric, as the mere tale of years goes, and a hundred years older in
knowledge of the struggles and difficulties of life which age a man far more quickly and
effectually than the passing of time.
Physically the two men bore no resemblance to one another, although they were
second cousins. Eric Marshall, tall, broad-shouldered, sinewy, walking with a free, easy
stride, which was somehow suggestive of reserve strength and power, was one of those
men regarding whom less-favoured mortals are tempted seriously to wonder why all the
gifts of fortune should be showered on one individual. He was not only clever and good
to look upon, but he possessed that indefinable charm of personality which is quite
independent of physical beauty or mental ability. He had steady, grayish-blue eyes, dark
chestnut hair with a glint of gold in its waves when the sunlight struck it, and a chin that
gave the world assurance of a chin. He was a rich man's son, with a clean young
manhood behind him and splendid prospects before him. He was considered a practical
sort of fellow, utterly guiltless of romantic dreams and visions of any sort.
 
Remove