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Jezebel's Daughter

Between The Parts
MR. DAVID GLENNEY PRODUCES HIS CORRESPONDENCE, AND THROWS
SOME NEW LIGHTS ON THE STORY
I
Be pleased to read the following letter from Mr. Lawyer's-Clerk-Schmuckle to Mr.
Town-Councilor-Hof:
"My honored Sir,--I beg to report that you may make your mind easy on the subject of
Madame Fontaine. If she leaves Frankfort, she will not slip away privately as she did at
Wurzburg. Wherever she may go now, we need not apply again to her relations in this
place to help us to find her. Henceforth I undertake to keep her in view until the
promissory note falls due.
"The lady is at present established as housekeeper in the employment of the firm of
Wagner, Keller, and Engelman; and there (barring accidents, which I shall carefully look
after) she is likely to remain.
"I have made a memorandum of the date at which her promissory note falls due--viz., the
31st December in the present year. The note being made payable at Wurzburg, you must
take care (in the event of its not being honored) to have the document protested in that
town, and to communicate with me by the same day's post. I will myself see that the law
takes its regular course.
"Permit me most gratefully to thank you for the advance on my regular fees which you
have so graciously transmitted, and believe me your obedient humble servant to
command."
II
I next submit a copy of a letter addressed by the late Chemistry-Professor Fontaine to an
honored friend and colleague. This gentleman is still living; and he makes it a condition
of supplying the copy that his name shall not appear:--
"Illustrious Friend and Colleague,--You will be surprised at so soon hearing from me
again. The truth is, that I have some interesting news for you. An alarming accident has
enabled me to test the value of one of my preparations on a living human subject--that
subject being a man.
"My last letter informed you that I had resolved on making no further use of the Formula
for recomposing some of the Borgia Poisons (erroneously supposed to be destroyed) left
to me on the death of my lamented Hungarian friend--my master in chemical science.
"The motives which have led me to this decision are, I hope, beyond the reach of blame.
 
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