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Identity Theft Knowledge

authority figure, a research firm, or other organization to collect information
about you such as name, address, birth date, and social security number.
After obtaining the information they need, they call your financial institution
and pretend to be you or someone with authorized access to your account.
They may claim they forgot their checkbook and need information about
their account using your information. With this information, they may gain
other personal information about you such as your bank and credit card
account numbers, your credit report information, and the status of savings
and investment portfolios.
Some information about you may be on public record such as whether you
own a home, pay your taxes, or have ever filed bankruptcy. It is not pre-
texting for another person to collect this kind of information.
Law:
The Law states it is illegal for anyone to:
·
Use false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements or documents to get
customer information from a financial institution or directly from a
customer of a financial institution.
·
Use forged, counterfeit, lost, or stolen documents to get customer
information from a financial institution or directly from a customer of
a financial institution.
·
Ask another person to get someone else’s customer information using
false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements or using false, fictitious, or
fraudulent documents, or forged, counterfeit, lost, or stolen
documents.
What Thieves Do With Your Information
Thieves have a variety of ways to use your personal information.
Credit Card Fraud:
·
New Accounts can be opened in your name and the delinquent
accounts appear on your credit reports when they don’t pay the bills.
·
Change the billing address on your credit cards to a new location, then
charging up as much as they can on your cards. The bills would be
going to the new address and not being paid. It could take some time
before you realize there was a problem.
 
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