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Hunter Cell


Killing is a business, and business is good. You don‘t
get much time in this line of work for personal reflection.
I suppose that I could spare a few minutes now to let you
in on this unusual assignment. The agents are getting near
the end of their current contracts anyway.
Ever since the President signed nineteen-triple-six
into action back in 2033, we‘ve been able to exist. We were
ordered to clean up the dregs and take out the social trash
of our American Civilization -- and we‘re damn good at it.
What we have done is nothing new or innovative. The great
civilizations of the world have done it before. Feudal
Japan had the ninja, the Crusades had the Nizari and
militaries around the world train their snipers. No, what
we do isn‘t new, it‘s just been legalized.
We had to take it a few steps further, though to
protect our -- interests. When quantum computing technology
became mainstream we found ways to use it to our advantage.
All of our recruits for this particular assignment had to
(and still must for that matter) undergo a medical
procedure that connects a quantum processor to their
brains. It‘s small, painless and definitely invasive. The
Cell uses these to track and monitor our agents in the
field. We wouldn‘t want a cold-blooded assassin with a
license to kill running rampant in our neighborhoods, would
we?
There are those in the social media that believe that
what we do is wrong and an abuse of power. Screw them. They
didn‘t see their own kid get raped and slit from ear to
ear. They weren‘t there when a cheap smartass thought that
it was a good idea to sell state secrets to punk terrorists
at the expense of our own troops. They certainly weren‘t
there when the drug cartels were smuggling humans and dope
across the borders.
No. None of those fools were there, and I‘d bet a
dollar to a stale doughnut that most of you weren‘t either.
There will always be those who will go out of their way to
find something wrong with a perfectly good system. No
matter, though.
I‘ve seen the question come up in the media, move in
social circles and I‘ve even been asked it myself on
occasion over the past eight years.
How can I get into your organization?
There‘s no clear cut easy explanation or operating
procedure for what we do. I tend to borrow a piece of
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