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History of the Jews


HISTORY OF THE JEWS
HISTORY OF THE? JEWS
BY? HEINRICH GRAETZ
VOL. I
From the Earliest Period to the Death of Simon? the Maccabee (135 B. C. E.)
PHILADELPHIA? The Jewish Publication Society of America? 5717–1956
Copyright, 1891, by? THE JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY OF AMERICA
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be? reproduced in any form without
permission in? writing from the publisher: except by a reviewer? who may quote brief
passages in a review to be? printed in a magazine or newspaper.
PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
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PREFACE.
It is a matter of especial satisfaction to me that my work, "The History of the Jews,
from the Earliest Times to the Present Day," should be rendered accessible to the
English-reading public in a compact form and by means of an adequate translation;
for in countries where English is spoken, books are not only bought, bound, and
placed in libraries, but are also read, taken to heart, and acted upon. It is therefore to
be expected that the English-speaking people, which has never disregarded but has
at all times recognised and appreciated the peculiar character of the Jewish race,
will feel an increased sympathy for it, on reading the alternations of its sublime and
tragical history.
English readers, to whom the forefathers of the Jews of to-day—the patriarchs,
heroes, and men of God—are familiar characters, will the better understand the
miracle which is exhibited in the history of the Jews during three thousand years.
The continuance of the Jewish race until the present day is a marvel not to be
overlooked even by those who deny the existence of miracles, and who only see in
the most astounding events, both natural and preternatural, the logical results of
cause and effect. Here we observe a phenomenon, which has developed and
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asserted itself in spite of all laws of nature, and we behold a culture which,
notwithstanding unspeakable hostility against its exponents, has nevertheless
profoundly modified the organism of nations.
It is the heartfelt aspiration of the author that this historical work, in its English
garb, may attain its object by putting an end to the hostile bearing against the Jewish
race, so that it may no longer be begrudged the peculiar sphere whereto it has been
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