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Hegel and the Rise of Social Theory


Ameri-
can rational spirit a decisive role in the struggle for
an
vil
Vlll PREFACE
adequate order of life, and spoke of 'the victory of
some
future and intensely vital rationality of the American
nation . . .' Knowing far better than his critics the
forces
that threatened freedom and reason, and recognizing
these
forces to have been bound up with the social system
Europe had acquired, he once looked beyond that conti-
nent to this as the only 'land of the future/
In the use of texts, I have frequently taken the
liberty
of citing an English translation and changing the
trans-
lator's rendering where I thought it necessary, without
stipulating that the change was made. Hegelian terms
are
often rendered by different English equivalents, and I
have attempted to avoid confusion on this score by
giving
the German word in parenthesis where a technical term
was involved.
The presentation of this study would not have been
possible without the assistance I received from Mr. Ed-
ward M. David who gave the book the stylistic form it
now has. I have drawn upon his knowledge of the Ameri-
can and British philosophic tradition to guide me in
se-
lecting those points that could and that could not be
taken for granted in offering Hegel's doctrine to an
Ameri-
can and English public.
I thank the Macmillan Company, New York, for grant-
ing me permission to use and quote their translations
of
Hegel's works, and I thank the following publishers for
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