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Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz

12. A Wonderful Escape
For a while the enemy hesitated to renew the attack. Then a few of them advanced until
another shot from the Wizard's revolver made them retreat.
"That's fine," said Zeb. "We've got 'em on the run now, sure enough."
"But only for a time," replied the Wizard, shaking his head gloomily. "These revolvers
are good for six shots each, but when those are gone we shall be helpless."
The Gargoyles seemed to realize this, for they sent a few of their band time after time to
attack the strangers and draw the fire from the little man's revolvers. In this way none of
them was shocked by the dreadful report more than once, for the main band kept far away
and each time a new company was sent into the battle. When the Wizard had fired all of
his twelve bullets he had caused no damage to the enemy except to stun a few by the
noise, and so he as no nearer to victory than in the beginning of the fray.
"What shall we do now?" asked Dorothy, anxiously.
"Let's yell--all together," said Zeb.
"And fight at the same time," added the Wizard. "We will get near Jim, so that he can
help us, and each one must take some weapon and do the best he can. I'll use my sword,
although it isn't much account in this affair. Dorothy must take her parasol and open it
suddenly when the wooden folks attack her. I haven't anything for you, Zeb."
"I'll use the king," said the boy, and pulled his prisoner out of the buggy. The bound
Gargoyle's arms extended far out beyond its head, so by grasping its wrists Zeb found the
king made a very good club. The boy was strong for one of his years, having always
worked upon a farm; so he was likely to prove more dangerous to the enemy than the
Wizard.
When the next company of Gargoyles advanced, our adventurers began yelling as if they
had gone mad. Even the kitten gave a dreadfully shrill scream and at the same time Jim
the cab-horse neighed loudly. This daunted the enemy for a time, but the defenders were
soon out of breath. Perceiving this, as well as the fact that there were no more of the
awful "bangs" to come from the revolvers, the Gargoyles advanced in a swarm as thick as
bees, so that the air was filled with them.
Dorothy squatted upon the ground and put up her parasol, which nearly covered her and
proved a great protection. The Wizard's sword-blade snapped into a dozen pieces at the
first blow he struck against the wooden people. Zeb pounded away with the Gargoyle he
was using as a club until he had knocked down dozens of foes; but at the last they
clustered so thickly about him that he no longer had room in which to swing his arms.
The horse performed some wonderful kicking and even Eureka assisted when she leaped
bodily upon the Gargoyles and scratched and bit at them like a wild-cat.
But all this bravery amounted to nothing at all. The wooden things wound their long arms
around Zeb and the Wizard and held them fast. Dorothy was captured in the same way,
and numbers of the Gargoyles clung to Jim's legs, so weighting him down that the poor
 
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