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Curiosities of Superstition


XVIII. Scottish Superstitions: Halloween
XIX. Second Sight: Divination: Universality of certain Superstitions: Fairies in Scotland
[Pg 1]
CURIOSITIES OF SUPERSTITION.
CHAPTER I.
BUDDHISM: ITS ORIGIN AND
CEREMONIES.
Prayer-Wheels of the Buddhists.
TRAVELLING on the borders of Chinese Tartary, in the country of the
Lamas or Buddhists, Miss Gordon Cumming remarks that it was
strange, every now and again, to meet some respectable-looking
workman, twirling little brass cylinders, only about six inches in
length, which were incessantly spinning round and round as they
walked along the road. What could they be? Not pedometers, not any
of the trigonometrical instruments with which the officers of the
Ordnance Survey go about armed? No; she was informed that they
were prayer-wheels, and that turning them was just about equivalent
to the telling of beads, which in Continental lands workmen may often
be seen counting as homeward along the road they plod their weary
way.
The telling of beads seems to the Protestant a superfluous piece of
formalism: what then are we to think of prayer by machinery? The
 
 
 
 
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