Not a member?     Existing members login below:
Holidays Offer
 

Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

this practice would cease; but as I do not readily believe that any man having
once tasted the divine luxuries of opium will afterwards descend to the gross and
mortal enjoyments of alcohol, I take it for granted
That
eat
now
who
never
ate
before;
And those who always ate, now eat the more.
Indeed, the fascinating powers of opium are admitted even by medical writers,
who are its greatest enemies. Thus, for instance, Awsiter, apothecary to
Greenwich Hospital, in his "Essay on the Effects of Opium" (published in the year
1763), when attempting to explain why Mead had not been sufficiently explicit on
the properties, counteragents, &c., of this drug, expresses himself in the following
mysterious terms ([Greek text]): "Perhaps he thought the subject of too delicate a
nature to be made common; and as many people might then indiscriminately use
it, it would take from that necessary fear and caution which should prevent their
experiencing the extensive power of this drug, FOR THERE ARE MANY
PROPERTIES IN IT, IF UNIVERSALLY KNOWN, THAT WOULD HABITUATE
THE USE, AND MAKE IT MORE IN REQUEST WITH US THAN WITH TURKS
THEMSELVES; the result of which knowledge," he adds, "must prove a general
misfortune." In the necessity of this conclusion I do not altogether concur; but
upon that point I shall have occasion to speak at the close of my Confessions,
where I shall present the reader with the MORAL of my narrative.
those
Remove