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Biographical Study of A.W. Kinglake

Footnotes:
{1} When "Heartsease" first appeared, Percy Fotheringham was believed to be a portrait;
but the accomplished authoress in a letter written not long before her death told me that
the character was wholly imaginary.
{2} Pedigrees are perplexing unless tabulated; so here is Kinglake's genealogical tree.
KINGLAKES OF SALTMOOR. WOODFORDES OF
CASTLE CARY.
| |
+-------------------+ |
| WILLIAM=MARY WOODFORDE.
ROBERT |
| +--------------------+
+--------------+ | |
| | | |
SERJEANT REV. W.C. A.W. KING- DR. HAMILTON
JOHN KING- KINGLAKE LAKE KINGLAKE.
LAKE. ("Eothen.")
{3} "Eothen," p. 33. Reading "Timbuctoo" to-day one is amazed it should have gained
the prize. Two short passages adumbrate the coming Tennyson, the rest is mystic
nonsense. "What do you think of Tennyson's prize poem?" writes Charles Wordsworth to
his brother Christopher. "Had it been sent up at Oxford, the author would have had a
better chance of spending a few months at a lunatic asylum than of obtaining the Prize."
A current Cambridge story at the time explained the selection. There were three
examiners, the Vice-Chancellor, a man of arbitrary temper, with whom his juniors
hesitated to disagree; a classical professor unversed in English Literature; a mathematical
professor indifferent to all literature. The letter g was to signify approval, the letter b to
brand it with rejection. Tennyson's manuscript came from the Vice-Chancellor scored all
over with g's. The classical professor failed to see its merit, but bowed to the Vice-
Chancellor, and added his g. The mathematical professor could not admire, but since both
his colleagues ordained it, good it must be, and his g made the award unanimous. The
three met soon after, and the Vice-Chancellor, in his blatant way, attacked the other two
for admiring a trashy poem. "Why," they remonstrated, "you covered it with g's yourself."
"G's," said he, "they were q's for queries; I could not understand a line of it."
{4} "Enoch Arden," p. 34.
{5} "Eothen," p. 169. Reprint by Bell and Sons, 1898.
{6} "Eothen," p. 17.
{7} His deferential regard for army rank was like that of Johnson for bishops. Great was
his indignation when the "grotesque Salvation Army," as he called it, adopted military
nomenclature. "I would let those ragamuffins call themselves saints, angels, prophets,
 
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