Not a member?     Existing members login below:

Betting Exchange Trader

Betting Exchange Trader 
What is Trading? 
How do shopkeepers, market stall traders, share traders etc. make profits? They buy whatever 
they are selling at wholesale or at prices lower than that at which they can sell those products. 
How does all of this fit into gambling markets? 
Just a few years ago someone named Andrew Black, who used to trade on the Stock Market, 
buying and selling shares, had the idea of applying the principles of his profession to gambling. 
He believed, that instead of punters being restricted to a one­way gamble (“Backing” to Win) 
with the traditional high street Bookmakers, it was possible to put people in touch with each 
other to enable them to buy and sell betting odds. His idea was to set­up a Betting Exchange. 
Although  there  are  now  several  of  these  exchanges  to  be  found  on  the  Internet,  by  far  the 
biggest is Betfair; the brainchild of Andrew Black. 
Role Playing 
Role 1 
This person wishes to LAY a 
contestant to LOSE and is 
willing to take up the bet of 
£100 at odds of 5.5 
He is effectively acting as a 
Bookmaker. 
This person wishes to BACK 
a contestant to WIN and 
wants to place a bet of £100 at 
odds of 5.5 
BETTING 
EXCHANGE 
BACKER 
LAYER
This person is the intermediary (The Betting Exchange). The Betting Exchange is bringing the BACKER and 
the LAYER together to strike a bet and will safely keep agreed bet funds in a Bank Deposit Account, until the 
result of the bet is known. 
He will take £100 from the BACKER and £450 from the LAYER until the result of the event is known. 
If the BACKER WINS, the Betting Exchange will transfer £550, less a small commission % (maximum of 
5%) ,into her account. This £550 is made up of winnings of £450, which the LAYER has had to pay out, and her 
original stake money of £100. The LAYER does not receive anything back into his account. 
If the BACKER LOSES, she has nothing deposited back to her account, but the LAYER gets to keep the £100, 
less a small commission %(maximum of 5%), put up by the BACKER, and this amount is duly deposited into 
his account together with the “collateral”  of £450 he had to deposit with the Betting Exchange for safe keeping. 
5 
Remove