Not a member?     Existing members login below:

Anne's House of Dreams

13. A Ghostly Evening
One evening, a week later, Anne decided to run over the fields to the house up the
brook for an informal call. It was an evening of gray fog that had crept in from the gulf,
swathed the harbor, filled the glens and valleys, and clung heavily to the autumnal
meadows. Through it the sea sobbed and shuddered. Anne saw Four Winds in a new
aspect, and found it weird and mysterious and fascinating; but it also gave her a little
feeling of loneliness. Gilbert was away and would be away until the morrow, attending a
medical pow-wow in Charlottetown. Anne longed for an hour of fellowship with some girl
friend. Captain Jim and Miss Cornelia were "good fellows" each, in their own way; but
youth yearned to youth.
"If only Diana or Phil or Pris or Stella could drop in for a chat," she said to herself, "how
delightful it would be! This is such a GHOSTLY night. I'm sure all the ships that ever
sailed out of Four Winds to their doom could be seen tonight sailing up the harbor with
their drowned crews on their decks, if that shrouding fog could suddenly be drawn
aside. I feel as if it concealed innumerable mysteries--as if I were surrounded by the
wraiths of old generations of Four Winds people peering at me through that gray veil. If
ever the dear dead ladies of this little house came back to revisit it they would come on
just such a night as this. If I sit here any longer I'll see one of them there opposite me in
Gilbert's chair. This place isn't exactly canny tonight. Even Gog and Magog have an air
of pricking up their ears to hear the footsteps of unseen guests. I'll run over to see Leslie
before I frighten myself with my own fancies, as I did long ago in the matter of the
Haunted Wood. I'll leave my house of dreams to welcome back its old inhabitants. My
fire will give them my good-will and greeting--they will be gone before I come back, and
my house will be mine once more. Tonight I am sure it is keeping a tryst with the past."
Laughing a little over her fancy, yet with something of a creepy sensation in the region
of her spine, Anne kissed her hand to Gog and Magog and slipped out into the fog, with
some of the new magazines under her arm for Leslie.
"Leslie's wild for books and magazines," Miss Cornelia had told her, "and she hardly
ever sees one. She can't afford to buy them or subscribe for them. She's really pitifully
poor, Anne. I don't see how she makes out to live at all on the little rent the farm brings
in. She never even hints a complaint on the score of poverty, but I know what it must be.
She's been handicapped by it all her life. She didn't mind it when she was free and
ambitious, but it must gall now, believe ME. I'm glad she seemed so bright and merry
the evening she spent with you. Captain Jim told me he had fairly to put her cap and
coat on and push her out of the door. Don't be too long going to see her either. If you
are she'll think it's because you don't like the sight of Dick, and she'll crawl into her shell
again. Dick's a great, big, harmless baby, but that silly grin and chuckle of his do get on
some people's nerves. Thank goodness, I've no nerves myself. I like Dick Moore better
now than I ever did when he was in his right senses--though the Lord knows that isn't
saying much. I was down there one day in housecleaning time helping Leslie a bit, and I
was frying doughnuts. Dick was hanging round to get one, as usual, and all at once he
 
Remove