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Amusements in Mathematics

66.—THE VILLAGE SIMPLETON.
A facetious individual who was taking a long walk in the country came upon a yokel
sitting on a stile. As the gentleman was not quite sure of his road, he thought he would
make inquiries of the local inhabitant; but at the first glance he jumped too hastily to the
conclusion that he had dropped on the village idiot. He therefore decided to test the
fellow's intelligence by first putting to him the simplest question he could think of, which
was, "What day of the week is this, my good man?" The following is the smart answer
that he received:—
"When the day after to-morrow is yesterday, to-day will be as far from Sunday as to-day
was from Sunday when the day before yesterday was to-morrow."
Can the reader say what day of the week it was? It is pretty evident that the countryman
was not such a fool as he looked. The gentleman went on his road a puzzled but a wiser
man.
LOCOMOTION AND SPEED PUZZLES.
"The race is not to the swift."—Ecclesiastes ix. II.
67.—AVERAGE SPEED.
In a recent motor ride it was found that we had gone at the rate of ten miles an hour, but
we did the return journey over the same route, owing to the roads being more clear of
traffic, at fifteen miles an hour. What was our average speed? Do not be too hasty in your
answer to this simple little question, or it is pretty certain that you will be wrong.
68.—THE TWO TRAINS.
I put this little question to a stationmaster, and his correct answer was so prompt that I am
convinced there is no necessity to seek talented railway officials in America or elsewhere.
Two trains start at the same time, one from London to Liverpool, the other from
Liverpool to London. If they arrive at their destinations one hour and four hours
respectively after passing one another, how much faster is one train running than the
other?
69.—THE THREE VILLAGES.
 
 
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