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Amusements in Mathematics

another. Of course, the moves need not be "queen moves;" you can move a queen to any
part of the board.
316.—THE AMAZONS.
This puzzle is based on one by Captain Turton. Remove three of the queens to other
squares so that there shall be eleven squares on the board that are not attacked. The
removal of the three queens need not be by "queen moves." You may take them up and
place them anywhere. There is only one solution.
317.—A PUZZLE WITH PAWNS.
Place two pawns in the middle of the chessboard, one at Q 4 and the other at K 5. Now,
place the remaining fourteen pawns (sixteen in all) so that no three shall be in a straight
line in any possible direction.
Note that I purposely do not say queens, because by the words "any possible direction" I
go beyond attacks on diagonals. The pawns must be regarded as mere points in space—at
the centres of the squares. See dotted lines in the case of No. This puzzle is based on one
by Captain Turton. Remove three of the queens to other squares so that there shall be
eleven squares on the board that are not attacked. The removal of the three queens need
not be by "queen moves." You may take them up and place them anywhere. There is only
one solution.
317.—A PUZZLE WITH PAWNS.
Place two pawns in the middle of the chessboard, one at Q 4 and the other at K 5. Now,
place the remaining fourteen pawns (sixteen in all) so that no three shall be in a straight
line in any possible direction.
Note that I purposely do not say queens, because by the words "any possible direction" I
go beyond attacks on diagonals. The pawns must be regarded as mere points in space—at
the centres of the squares. See dotted lines in the case of No. 300, "The Eight Queens."
318.—LION-HUNTING
My friend Captain Potham Hall, the renowned hunter of big game, says there is nothing
more exhilarating than a brush with a herd—a pack—a team—a flock—a swarm (it has
taken me a full quarter of an hour to recall the right word, but I have it at last)—a pride of
lions. Why a number of lions are called a "pride," a number of whales a "school," and a
number of foxes a "skulk" are mysteries of philology into which I will not enter.
Well, the captain says that if a spirited lion crosses your path in the desert it becomes
lively, for the lion has generally been looking for the man just as much as the man has
sought the king of the forest. And yet when they meet they always quarrel and fight it
out. A little contemplation of this unfortunate and long-standing feud between two
estimable families has led me to figure out a few calculations as to the probability of the
man and the lion crossing one another's path in the jungle. In all these cases one has to
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