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A history of witchcraft in England


A History of Witchcraft in England from by Wallace Notestein
2
1909
To this Essay was awarded the Herbert Baxter Adams Prize in European History for 1909
A HISTORY OF WITCHCRAFT IN ENGLAND FROM 1558 TO 1718
BY WALLACE NOTESTEIN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF
MINNESOTA
PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION WASHINGTON, 1911
COPYRIGHT, 1911 BY THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION WASHINGTON, D.C.
THE LORD BALTIMORE PRESS BALTIMORE, M.D., U.S.A.
PREFACE.
In its original form this essay was the dissertation submitted for a doctorate in philosophy conferred by Yale
University in 1908. When first projected it was the writer's purpose to take up the subject of English
witchcraft under certain general political and social aspects. It was not long, however, before he began to feel
that preliminary to such a treatment there was necessary a chronological survey of the witch trials. Those
strange and tragic affairs were so closely involved with the politics, literature, and life of the seventeenth
century that one is surprised to find how few of them have received accurate or complete record in history. It
may be said, in fact, that few subjects have gathered about themselves so large concretions of misinformation
as English witchcraft. This is largely, of course, because so little attention has been given to it by serious
students of history. The mistakes and misunderstandings of contemporary writers and of the local historians
have been handed down from county history to county history until many of them have crept into general
works. For this reason it was determined to attempt a chronological treatment which would give a narrative
history of the more significant trials along with some account of the progress of opinion. This plan has been
adhered to somewhat strictly, sometimes not without regret upon the part of the writer. It is his hope later in a
series of articles to deal with some of the more general phases of the subject, with such topics as the use of
torture, the part of the physicians, the contagious nature of the witch alarms, the relation of Puritanism to
persecution, the supposed influence of the Royal Society, the general causes for the gradual decline of the
belief, and other like questions. It will be seen in the course of the narrative that some of these matters have
been touched upon.
This study of witchcraft has been limited to a period of about one hundred and sixty years in English history.
The year 1558 has been chosen as the starting point because almost immediately after the accession of
Elizabeth there began the movement for a new law, a movement which resulted in the statute of 1563. With
that statute the history of the persecution of witches gathers importance. The year 1718 has been selected as a
concluding date because that year was marked by the publication of Francis Hutchinson's notable attack upon
the belief. Hutchinson levelled a final and deadly blow at the dying superstition. Few men of intelligence
dared after that avow any belief in the reality of witchcraft; it is probable that very few even secretly cherished
such a belief. A complete history would of course include a full account both of the witch trials from
Anglo-Saxon times to Elizabeth's accession and of the various witch-swimming incidents of the eighteenth
century. The latter it has not seemed worth while here to consider. The former would involve an examination
of all English sources from the earliest times and would mean a study of isolated and unrelated trials occurring
at long intervals (at least, we have record only of such) and chiefly in church courts. The writer has not
undertaken to treat this earlier period; he must confess to but small knowledge of it. In the few pages which he
has given to it he has attempted nothing more than to sketch from the most obvious sources an outline of what
is currently known as to English witches and witchcraft prior to the days of Elizabeth. It is to be hoped that
some student of medieval society will at some time make a thorough investigation of the history of witchcraft
 
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