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A critique of Christian Fundamentalism

TOWARDS A 21ST CENTURY CHRISTIANITY
p. 314
THE SPIRITUAL LIFE OF A MANIC-DEPRESSIVE
p.384
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COPYRIGHT ROBERT LAYNTON 2012
Introduction
by Pilgrim Simon (Robert Laynton)
All the essays in this collection have been published before on various
blog sites and e-book sites on the web, but they have never been
gathered together in this way before. They deal with key issues that are
central to Christian Fundamentalism. Christian Fundamentalism is dealt
with rather than Fundamentalism as whole, because it is Christian Fun-
damentalism that I am most familiar with and have most experience of.
Nevertheless, certain aspects of these essays and certain principles con-
tained within them can be applied to the wider Fundamentalist
movement.
Christian fundamentalist ideology can be very powerful indeed. Once
the believer accepts certain assumptions as fact, Christian fundamentalist
thinking can exert an iron grip on the believer, locking them into a self-
perpetuating and isolated system of thought and behaviour. Indeed, for
Calvinist thinkers such as B.B. Warfield and Charles Hodge who found
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