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A Little Princess

you happier. And he told Ram Dass to climb into your attic window and try to make you
comfortable."
Sara gave a start of joy; her whole look changed.
"Did Ram Dass bring the things?" she cried out. "Did he tell Ram Dass to do it? Did he
make the dream that came true?"
"Yes, my dear--yes! He is kind and good, and he was sorry for you, for little lost Sara
Crewe's sake."
The library door opened and Mr. Carmichael appeared, calling Sara to him with a
gesture.
"Mr. Carrisford is better already," he said. "He wants you to come to him."
Sara did not wait. When the Indian gentleman looked at her as she entered, he saw that
her face was all alight.
She went and stood before his chair, with her hands clasped together against her breast.
"You sent the things to me," she said, in a joyful emotional little voice, "the beautiful,
beautiful things? YOU sent them!"
"Yes, poor, dear child, I did," he answered her. He was weak and broken with long illness
and trouble, but he looked at her with the look she remembered in her father's eyes--that
look of loving her and wanting to take her in his arms. It made her kneel down by him,
just as she used to kneel by her father when they were the dearest friends and lovers in
the world.
"Then it is you who are my friend," she said; "it is you who are my friend!" And she
dropped her face on his thin hand and kissed it again and again.
"The man will be himself again in three weeks," Mr. Carmichael said aside to his wife.
"Look at his face already."
In fact, he did look changed. Here was the "Little Missus," and he had new things to think
of and plan for already. In the first place, there was Miss Minchin. She must be
interviewed and told of the change which had taken place in the fortunes of her pupil.
Sara was not to return to the seminary at all. The Indian gentleman was very determined
upon that point. She must remain where she was, and Mr. Carmichael should go and see
Miss Minchin himself.
"I am glad I need not go back," said Sara. "She will be very angry. She does not like me;
though perhaps it is my fault, because I do not like her."
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