Inspiration can come from surprising places

IMG_0001_2I had occasion to send some encouraging words to a demotivated writer today. Why is that something of note? Because it’s ironic; I myself am somewhat of a demotivated writer. I struggle with all kinds of fears and misgivings about writing. A lot of the blocks I am dealing with are real ones – stress of a military deployment, health issues, school, work, personal issues – but a lot of those blocks are also psychological (e.g. “What’s the point? I really don’t write very well at all – not enough to make a difference.”)

My advice to the demotivated writer was this:

“… exposure would be good to help bolster confidence. One should never stop writing because one feels ‘there is no use’. One should always continue writing no matter what. Practice makes perfect. And a lot of mistakes one makes as a young writer get improved over time and with experience.”

I wish I would take my own advice. :)

The truth is, as writers, we all face one kind of discouragement or another. Especially for a profession that is mostly self-propelled, encouragement has to come from within. Which sounds a whole lot easier than it actually is. I don’t know about you, but I need some kind of inspiration in order to encourage myself, spur myself on. Inspiration can come from multiple places, but some of the places I get the most of my inspiration from is in nature.

The other day, I opened my back door on my way to my usual 10 minute sit out on the deck every hour or so. There was a female deer standing in the middle of my back yard. Clearly she was startled when I opened the door, but she didn’t move. She just stood watching me; waiting, I would guess, to see whether I was going to harm her or not. I stepped outside calmly and said softly, “Hello there!” with a smile on my face and in my heart. And then sat, as usual, at the deck table. Apparently, that was encouraging enough, for she bent her head and munched on the overgrown grass and weeds in my woefully unkempt lawn. A few seconds later, a baby deer came bounding out of the greenbelt and ran to head-butt its mother. I could see the moment he realised I was sitting there. His little legs sort of froze and he shivered just the tiniest bit. Then he turned to observe me. He stood looking at me for a few seconds, and I said again “Hello there!”, with a little lilt in my voice.

To cut a long story short, this mother and baby seemed satisfied that I was harmless and continued about their frolic in my back yard. It inspired me because that was a connection with nature. It doesn’t seem like much, because in human terms, there was no tangible evidence of communication exchanged. I didn’t really get a response to my “Hi there”. But, if you think about it in terms of nonverbal communication, I did get a response. The minute mom and baby turned away from me and continued on their path calmly was a communication in itself. It told me that I had succeeded in setting them at ease with my presence.

What is inspiring about this episode? Simply this: I just told you a story. :) A story about an interaction with nature at it’s best. A story that probably made you smile and say to yourself “Well, that’s beautiful”.

And isn’t that all story-telling is supposed to be about?

Go ahead – write, and write well.

  • Ray Pearse

    Hi
    Having read this I have to say how privileged you were to be at one with Nature and how lucky you are to have the wherewithall to see the inspiration and convey the message.
    Thankyou
    Ray

    • Gord

      Quiet. Peace. Harmony. Nature. It is amazing how quickly it heals the soul releasing the creative energies. I too am blessed with chipmunks, rabbits and deer in the garden and a rainbow of birds and flowers. I does restore my energies.

  • Claire

    A doe is a female deer. A fawn is a baby deer…

    • http://fyrfli.net Camille

      Ah. Thank you. I overlooked that. Correcting.

  • Gord

    Quiet. Peace. Harmony. Nature. It is amazing how quickly it heals the soul releasing the creative energies.
    I too am blessed with chipmunks, rabbits and deer in the garden and a
    rainbow of birds and flowers. It does restore my energies.

  • Mikeinthedirt

    Writing is not very hard. Writers make it very difficult by diving into the detail and mechanics that most people never notice. “If you could eavesdrop on every word said about you, you would spend almost all your time just waiting for the subject to come up.”~ Robert Brault. Most folk are so self-involved ( just like writers) they hardly notice anyone else. Don’t let perfect be the enemy of the good. Plus, that’s how that practice thing works best. I liked your story.

    • http://fyrfli.net Camille

      “If you could eavesdrop on every word said about you, you would spend almost all your time just waiting for the subject to come up.” ~Robert Brault

      I like that. It’s a saying that could be applied in more situations than just writing too. Thank you for this. I’m going to hold onto that quote. :)

  • tesfaye

    interesting!

  • Robert

    I just love writers who make you feel as though you are the person in the book.

  • Roshu

    Not everyone has the gift to put their thoughts into words. so continue to give your piece of world to all. :)

  • Dona

    Right on,write on Camille. I loved your 1000 word worth in picture form as well.